Greater Greater Washington

Report a Comment

. Price the prior neighborhood residents out and cater to the new, more affluent clients of the future. It never goes back.

1. Never say never. Places like 14th Street saw their fortunes decline from when they were first developed at some time. Long time horizons, I know, but far shorter than 'never.'

2. There is and will be fundamental neighborhood change, no doubt about that. However, we're not just talking about the dynamics of specific neighborhoods. We're also talking about the housing market as a whole, for the entire region.

Expensive housing does indeed soak up demand from other neighborhoods, because the demand is somewhat finite. Our supply is not even close to keeping pace with growing demand, however.

by Alex B. on Dec 19, 2012 2:11 pm • linkreport

Does this comment violate Greater Greater Washington's comment policy? If so, you can report it using this form and an editor will take a look.

Which rules in the comment policy do you believe the comment violates?
Comment is spam.
Comment attacks other individuals personally.
Comment is name-calling or berates, belittles, or interrogates others.
Comment discourages others from posting their ideas.
Comment is getting into an aggressive argument with another.
Comment is trolling.
Comment is off topic.
Commenter is impersonating someone else or switching handles.
Comment uses profanity or abusive language.
Comment advocates violent acts or harm to another.
Comment was posted in multiple areas of the site.
Comment is arguing about the comment policy.

Enter any other information you think would be helpful to us:

Your name:
Your email:

To be sure you're not a spammer, please use the map below to answer this question:
If you are at the Tenleytown Metrorail station and head outbound on the Red Line, what is the next station you will reach?   

This map contains the answer to the challenge question.
Click to see the larger map. Feel free to ignore station subtitles.
Administrator pagespam