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Ah yes... nothing like some BRT misdirection/creep to enliven a discussion!

I'm sure they will have transit only lanes in Fells Point and DT Baltimore for buses... or it would just end up being some painted buses.

by h st ll in The Baltimore Red Line does need a tunnel, despite its cost on Jul 1, 2015 8:35 pm • linkreport

This plan would be a disaster. Not enough trains to handle the demand.

It would be better to consider the following:

Blue Line 7 TPH (from Huntington, not F/S)
Silver Line 8 TPH
Orange Line 9 TPH

For a total of 24 TPH through Downtown. 1 train every 2.5 minutes Downtown.

On the eastern side, they should finally get rid of the notion that only Orange goes to New Carrollton and only Blue and Silver go to Largo. Each color should go to each destination (similar to what the yellow line now does on the southern end). Let the color designate how the line travels in Virginia, but on the other side people should focus on the destination listed on the train itself. The cars will alternate: 12 TPH to New Carrollton and 12 TPH to Largo. I don't think that's too hard for most people to understand.

Now with regard to the green and yellow lines, there should be 10 TPH traveling from Greenbelt to Branch and another 10 TPH traveling from MVS to Franconia/Springfield. Each line will have a train every 6 min, with every 3 min in the combined middle section under 7th Street.

So the end stations get served as follows:

Wiehle: 8 TPH
Vienna: 9 TPH
F/S: 10 TPH
Huntington: 7 TPH

Shady Grove: 10 TPH
Glenmont: 10 TPH
Greenbelt: 10 TPH
New Carrollton: 12 TPH
Largo: 12 TPH
Branch: 10 TPH

by mrsman in Metro floats cutting service for the Green, Yellow, Orange, and Silver Lines on Jul 1, 2015 8:19 pm • linkreport

There is signal priority installed, activated, and working on the Howard street light rail corridor.

The solution to the transit problem on the redline corridor is BRT which can be designed, installed and operating in 5 years. It was dismissed during the planning process because it wasn't "attractive" but was 1/10 of the cost.

by RedLine Eng in The Baltimore Red Line does need a tunnel, despite its cost on Jul 1, 2015 8:16 pm • linkreport

Potomac Yard Metro-
Considering Metro says it will take about 26 billion that they don't have and won't be getting in the coming decades to build the mythical new crossing, 285 million looks like a drop in the bucket.

by Mike P in Metro floats cutting service for the Green, Yellow, Orange, and Silver Lines on Jul 1, 2015 8:06 pm • linkreport

As far as the intersection at Forest Glen /Georgia, there are a number of things that SHA can do to make it better:

1) Recognizing that it is right outside of a Metro station and therefore people may be walking there, they should have no turn on red in all directions and leading pedestrian intervals.

2) Incorporate a left turn lane at the intersection. I believe that there is no left turn lane now due to the reversible lane on Georgia, which becomes the left northbound lane under the Beltway. So, get rid of the reversible lane and convert that left lane into a left turn lane. Moderate restriping would be needed and reorienting the median, but no need for widening Georgia to accomplish this.

3) Install a bike lane on FG between Georgia Ave and Darcy Forest. Westbound does not need two lanes of traffic, so there is room.

As far as the MARC station goes, I believe it's a waste of money. There aren't any significant job centers here to attract those coming from WV/Frederick County/upper MoCo. Plus, most residents would probably still ride the red line because it's more frequent. White Flint MARC makes sense because they are planning a lot of jobs there.

by mrsman in Forest Glen residents and a state delegate want a MARC station in Forest Glen on Jul 1, 2015 8:01 pm • linkreport

@Frank,

The expense gets shared if I understand his proposal correctly by sharing a tunnel or tunnels by Amtrak and MTA. Also, currently the West side of this plan is in the denuded blocks for the failed US 40 highway block destruction for I-70. It would be easy to take over the lowered expressway section and then cover it and shunt that to traffic to surface streets where it belongs. So half the length is pretty darn cheap.

by NikolasM in The Baltimore Red Line does need a tunnel, despite its cost on Jul 1, 2015 6:49 pm • linkreport

The Baltimore Red Line does need a tunnel, despite its cost

It does, through downtown. But the cooks lane portion that became a tunnel added significantly to the cost and provided little benefit. NIMBYs helping to kill the line.

by Richard in The Baltimore Red Line does need a tunnel, despite its cost on Jul 1, 2015 6:46 pm • linkreport

@Scoot

Probably, but in the interim we could have a viable backup if a future administration would like to consider it. That said,

I do think removing parking on many of those streets through the core actually is a better outcome than a tunnel. If parking becomes more costly and less available, it could make the transit alternative that much more appealing, if done intelligently.

by Randall M. in The Baltimore Red Line does need a tunnel, despite its cost on Jul 1, 2015 6:46 pm • linkreport

On another topic, I've heard for years about problems with the Howard Street freight tunnel. Too old, too narrow, not tall enough for double-stacked freight. Has it ever been considered -- and would it be feasible -- to repurpose the tunnel for the light rail and route the freight trains elsewhere?

Yes they have been trying to get CSX out of there for decades. CSX has been trying to get out of there for nearly half a century. An alternative route is going to be massively expensive.

by Richard in The Baltimore Red Line does need a tunnel, despite its cost on Jul 1, 2015 6:45 pm • linkreport

@Randall

Pretty sure the entire project is already scuttled, at least for the next few years.

by Scoot in The Baltimore Red Line does need a tunnel, despite its cost on Jul 1, 2015 6:39 pm • linkreport

@CBF and @Scoot

While my personal preference is always to place transportation elements underground, Baltimore could remove parking on streets to accommodate light rail. It currently works on Howard Street and seems to work fairly well. The important thing is that something get built and that we do not scuttle the entire project, like we almost did with the Silver line through Tysons.

by Randall M. in The Baltimore Red Line does need a tunnel, despite its cost on Jul 1, 2015 6:30 pm • linkreport

@ mcs - having Amtrak go in an absolutely straight line through downtown Baltimore is an absolutely awesome idea, but I shudder at the expense.

And where would freight trains go?

by Frank IBC in The Baltimore Red Line does need a tunnel, despite its cost on Jul 1, 2015 6:30 pm • linkreport

I think we need to have a hearing on SeeClickFix and DC311 app. It's full of jokes -- closed months later without fixed. Why are we having a "third" way to report issues?

Mr. Molouff -- can you interview Director of DDOT and see what he has to say about all of our comments. And if DDOT can't deliver their promises, what should he expect from us?

by Dave in Crowdsource safety problems on DC streets with this interactive Vision Zero map on Jul 1, 2015 6:19 pm • linkreport

I've read all your comments and I thank you.

Given the above, what do you think about the proposed new Potomac Yard Metro @ $285 million plus dollars?

Will it help the greater Metro system? Could then money be better spent as a jurisdiction contribution towards a new cross Potomac bridge/tunnel? Do you have no opinion as it's private borrowing by Alexandria City?

That money amount sure could help bring West End Alexandria into a modern day commute. 50% of Alexandria City taxes are derived from the West End residents. Slightly off topic but thank you for any responses/thoughts.

by Potomac Yard Metro-your thoughts in Metro floats cutting service for the Green, Yellow, Orange, and Silver Lines on Jul 1, 2015 6:18 pm • linkreport

Damn, I opened a bit of a hornet's nest regarding diversity. Well, the writers don't always agree with each other, and the commentators certainly don't.

by SJE in "Convincing" and "enjoyable" "even with the wonkiness" on Jul 1, 2015 6:05 pm • linkreport

CBF and Scoot: I'm not going to delete parts of your comments, but I'd like to ask you to please knock off the "I'm surprised you think..." "You did not read that" stuff.

This doesn't contribute to a constructive dialogue. Our goal is to have a comment section which informs other readers who want to learn more. Seeing some regular commenters snipe at each other does not achieve that.

If someone thinks something, like that an elevated line exists, just point out correct information "There was no elevated line" instead of criticizing another for thinking there was one, or saying another did not read your comment, and so forth.

Thank you very much for helping create and maintain a constructive and useful comment section.

by David Alpert in The Baltimore Red Line does need a tunnel, despite its cost on Jul 1, 2015 5:49 pm • linkreport

I have left the area and still read this blog for the wonkish comments. I can't find a NY based urban planning blog with consistently in-depth articles and anything close to the more sophisticated discourse found in the GGW comments.

by Administrator in "Convincing" and "enjoyable" "even with the wonkiness" on Jul 1, 2015 5:46 pm • linkreport

@rosita - the planning of Dulles and NoVA is a failure of planning, top to bottom. Dulles is in the middle of nowhere if you live in D.C. or Maryland. That would be fine if NoVA had a high enough population to sustain it, but the airport is struggling to fill flights. The vast majority of D.C. and Maryland residents go elsewhere to fly if at all possible. The Silver Line doesn't solve this problem, because it doesn't improve travel times over driving for most people - even when Metro does run a sufficient number of trains and does so on time.

@Mike If you look at the ridership numbers (PlanItMetro has some good info), the Silver Line is doing poorly by almost any measure. That's not to say that it's completely useless - but given demand for transit in this area and limited money and political will, we can't afford to build lines where they won't be fully utilized. A line from, say, South Arlington to H Street would have gotten a lot more use and taken many more cars off the road. The worst thing is that all of this could have been predicted. We knew which stations had the highest fare revenue. We knew we could only fit so many trains through Rosslyn. And now hundreds of thousands of commuters are going to be adversely impacted, and many will simply decide Metro isn't worth the trouble. That's really bad for everyone. The Silver Line is one step forward, two steps back for mass transit.

@Ryan. It is both, and that's a big problem. As a result, it doesn't do either one very well. Sometime, 100 years from now, we will have realized that only efficient way to move people in this area is to bulk up MARC and VRE in the suburbs and focus Metro service on the core where people use it for everyday trips and not simply for commuting.

by John in Metro floats cutting service for the Green, Yellow, Orange, and Silver Lines on Jul 1, 2015 5:24 pm • linkreport

I am surprised that you think an elevated line ever existed in Fells Point

I never said an elevated line existed in Fells Point. I actually said that that a streetcar went through Fells Point, but probably you did not read that.

Now ... what you said, and this is verbatim of course, is that "Fells Point, an historic area, with narrow streets, bustling pedestrian activity, and (for Baltimore) high RE values, is hardly the best place for [an elevated railway]."

Notwithstanding that I never said that Fells Point was "the best place for an elevated railway" (I personally think they are an outdated technology), nonetheless your comment seems to imply that because Fells Point has narrow streets, high real estate values and a lot of pedestrian activity that it is not suitable for an elevated railway.

by Scoot in The Baltimore Red Line does need a tunnel, despite its cost on Jul 1, 2015 5:13 pm • linkreport

Y'all gotta run that exercise again. I mean that poor soul in Springfield looks like they're halfway to North Carolina. I'd like to believe someone from Baltimore or Fredericksburg reads GGW.

It's just people who write for GGW. Though a survey of readers would be interesting too! I thing Sand Box John lives all the way out in Salisbury, MD!

by MLD in "Convincing" and "enjoyable" "even with the wonkiness" on Jul 1, 2015 5:08 pm • linkreport

@ CBF

I am totally sure you passed me on four mile run or WOD. Hey, I'm tryin' my best out there.

@ Dan Reed!

Y'all gotta run that exercise again. I mean that poor soul in Springfield looks like they're halfway to North Carolina. I'd like to believe someone from Baltimore or Fredericksburg reads GGW.

by Paul J. Meissner in "Convincing" and "enjoyable" "even with the wonkiness" on Jul 1, 2015 5:01 pm • linkreport

While I wish Hogan well in his health, he will not be governor forever, and the Red Line may well come up again. I would suggest that if it does, it should be pursued with the current plan of a tunnel. I am not convinced that it is even worth the (non zero) cost to do a feasibility study for an el.

by CrossingBrooklynFerry in The Baltimore Red Line does need a tunnel, despite its cost on Jul 1, 2015 4:48 pm • linkreport

I am surprised that you think an elevated line ever existed in Fells Point, or that it would be compatible now. Or that surface line would not present huge problems to people using every other mode of transportation.

"It was just that the implication that elevated railways don't belong in historic neighborhoods "

Good thing I never said that. I am not calling for tearing down the Loop el (in NYC of course tearing down the els resulted in the destruction of some historic buildings, by raising property values in what had been slums) I am suggesting that new els should not be built through the middle of dense historic neighborhoods, except perhaps in the most exceptional circumstances (of which Red Line is not one) Just as I do not think freeways should be built through downtowns, but I accept that in many cases legacy ones cannot be removed.

by CrossingBrooklynFerry in The Baltimore Red Line does need a tunnel, despite its cost on Jul 1, 2015 4:46 pm • linkreport

@mcs

I like your ideas for Baltimore. Straightens out a lot of things.

by NikolasM in The Baltimore Red Line does need a tunnel, despite its cost on Jul 1, 2015 4:46 pm • linkreport

There are HUGE numbers of cyclists with grey hair, as anyone who spends much time biking would know. It is especially fun when you pass someone (an adult) who is obviously less than half your age.

by CrossingBrooklynFerry in "Convincing" and "enjoyable" "even with the wonkiness" on Jul 1, 2015 4:40 pm • linkreport

re history

I think its more along the lines of pointing out that the way America built from 1945 (though it started in some places in the 1920s) to 1990 or so (though change began in a few places before 1990) which to many seems like the way humans were meant to live, was in fact an anomaly.

That does not mean either is the only way we can live - maybe we will all live in outer space soon, I don't know. But it means it is worth looking at why we lived the other way for so long, and how we made it work, and which parts of post war changes we want to keep, and which discard.

by CrossingBrooklynFerry in "Convincing" and "enjoyable" "even with the wonkiness" on Jul 1, 2015 4:39 pm • linkreport

IMO, it's almost pointless to debate elevated versus subway. I think Hogan was going to cancel this thing no matter what.

Yes, I agree, thanks for the perspective and flinging us all back into reality :)

It was just that the implication that elevated railways don't belong in historic neighborhoods jumped out at me as weird, and I felt compelled to jump into that rabbit hole to note that elevated railways are quite at home in historic neighborhoods, and actually underground subway tunnels are relatively newfangled in comparison. That certainly doesn't mean I, or anyone else for that matter, has all the data to support whether an elevated railway is a better idea than a subway tunnel, just as no one has the data to support the converse.

by Scoot in The Baltimore Red Line does need a tunnel, despite its cost on Jul 1, 2015 4:38 pm • linkreport

dcer

Clearly employed childless people can still put a roof over there head (sharing a 2BR) paying less than 30% of income. (And if they do not have to commute to say, Tysons, their commute isn't even that terrible) That is terrific. In a world where you couldn't find an affordable share for a single, the situation facing single parents with children would be even more dire than it in fact is.

We have a crisis for poor families. We have either significant burdens or limited options for poor singles, and moderate income families. For people better off than those, we simply have choices distorted by limited supply, often in ways that are harmful to the environment. Whether the sum of those is worthy of being called a "crisis" or should be called a banana, does not much matter to me. It is something we can and should change.

by CrossingBrooklynFerry in Breakfast links: New legislation on Jul 1, 2015 4:35 pm • linkreport

@Paul

Our contributors come from all over the region and many different walks of life (including, but not limited to the Millennials who ride bikes segment). Back in 2014, we asked everyone why they live where they do and even made a map of it.

by dan reed! in "Convincing" and "enjoyable" "even with the wonkiness" on Jul 1, 2015 4:31 pm • linkreport

I think there's a legit question of how truths from the past change as technology and society evolve.

For sure, I agree completely. I mean, it is the postmodern urbanist mindset that just because something is done one way for a long time doesn't mean that's the correct way to do it. Except when it comes to things that you like. Then, of course, that it's been done that way for a long time is a reason to keep it that way!

by Scoot in "Convincing" and "enjoyable" "even with the wonkiness" on Jul 1, 2015 4:30 pm • linkreport

"But, the articles themselves are written almost entirely from the POV of a millenial living carless in DC who bikes to work and uses Uber on the weekends."

I am an empty nester who lives in Virginia, owns a car, and has never used Uber. There is great coverage of areas outside the District, a clear commitment to multimodalism, and a concern for all demographic groups. Clearly the blog advocates a transportation system more focused on transit and active transportation relative to driving, and changes to urban forms to support that (and because of the folks who volunteer to post, more of the pieces on issues other than transport and development are District focused) but it is still a pretty side focus, IMO.

by CrossingBrooklynFerry in "Convincing" and "enjoyable" "even with the wonkiness" on Jul 1, 2015 4:28 pm • linkreport

fundamental truths that govern how cities & transportation work, based on centuries of international experience.

I think there's a legit question of how truths from the past change as technology and society evolve. Clearly everything from the invention of cars to bikeshare, Uber, smartphones, interstates and telecommuting changes things. Few important questions have such black and white answers.

by Falls Church in "Convincing" and "enjoyable" "even with the wonkiness" on Jul 1, 2015 4:16 pm • linkreport

[This comment has been deleted for violating the comment policy.]

by Jasper in "Convincing" and "enjoyable" "even with the wonkiness" on Jul 1, 2015 4:12 pm • linkreport

I think most of these are among for transparency and accountability, which often lacks in governmental operations. If this tool is well used by the public, and is constant (as in regular updates and tracking) - and if the city is being held to at least reviewing (let alone the digital paper trail of reports), there may be something to come out of it.

If there's any hearings or meeting stop discuss progress on Vision Zero efforts - and is public - go there, testify or speak - and cite with data from the site when topics are brought up. It is a two-way street (sorry for the transportation analogy) but at times, you have to be an active participant or agitator to hold folks feet to the fire.

I think with the other tools, 511 and the app, the public couldn't see the data being reported, so there was no aggregate accountability - this may move things away from that without having to subpoena the DC Government and DDOT.

by Amelie in Crowdsource safety problems on DC streets with this interactive Vision Zero map on Jul 1, 2015 4:01 pm • linkreport

I love GGW. It's a great place to read opinions and articles I support, and also those that may really chap my hide. Unlike most places on the interwebs, the discourse and discussion is mostly free from dimwitted nonsense and filth. GGW is cultivating the bonsai of modern urbanism.

by The Truth™ in "Convincing" and "enjoyable" "even with the wonkiness" on Jul 1, 2015 3:52 pm • linkreport

This blog, along most others in the urbanist blogosphere, are written with an understanding of fundamental truths that govern how cities & transportation work, based on centuries of international experience. If someone wants to start a blog from an American exceptionalist point of view - where cars aren't irrefutably the most inefficient form of transportation by any measure, where the suburbs aren't subsidized by 75 years worth of federal, state, and local policies, and where automobiles and cars don't push huge amounts of negative externalities onto society as a whole - then go ahead. Just don't expect anyone with an actual understanding of cities or transportation to take you seriously ;)

by beetroot in "Convincing" and "enjoyable" "even with the wonkiness" on Jul 1, 2015 3:50 pm • linkreport

Baltimore Needs to Think Bigger

(1) Route NEC Through Downtown (New Baltimore Penn Station) via tunnel under Route 40

(2) Transfer Unused NEC to CSX/NS

(3) Transfer Howard Tunnel to MTA (Express LRT)

(4) Route Downtown Portion of Red Line with Amtrak

(5) Reconfigure I-83 to Boulevard

https://www.google.com/maps/d/edit?mid=zQQBCxHd6New.kaQfCWXvG8gk

by mcs in The Baltimore Red Line does need a tunnel, despite its cost on Jul 1, 2015 3:49 pm • linkreport

According to a quick online search, a 2 BR apartment in Belcrest Plaza, behind the PG Plaza Mall costs $1,360 per month, so that's less than $700 each if you have a roommate. Those apartments are walking distance to all kinds of shopping and Metro. In other words, affordable housing in the DC Metro area. There are examples like this all over the region.

But...its not cool to live near the PG Plaza Mall, ergo, we have a "housing crisis."

by dcer52 in Breakfast links: New legislation on Jul 1, 2015 3:42 pm • linkreport

Let's remember this fiasco next time someone suggests expanding Metro outside of the core. That's what regional rail and commuter trains are for.
Metro is a regional rail system.

by Ryan in Metro floats cutting service for the Green, Yellow, Orange, and Silver Lines on Jul 1, 2015 3:35 pm • linkreport

Re: Diversity of opinion

First, I'd say the comments definitely have a wider diversity of opinion than the articles. Second, while the articles stay within the bounds of a certain broad set of agreed-upon principles, they're actually pretty diverse.

More importantly, the articles serve up their views with plenty of facts, even if there are other ways of stringing those facts into a story (and those alternatives can often be found in the comments section).

by Falls Church in "Convincing" and "enjoyable" "even with the wonkiness" on Jul 1, 2015 3:31 pm • linkreport

@ Paul J. Meissner

About 85% - 90% of the Washington Metro Area lives outside of the District and the vast majority of them people drive to work, and it would be interesting to read some articles from that point of view.

I thought that's what Dr. Gridlock was for? ;)

by Andy L in "Convincing" and "enjoyable" "even with the wonkiness" on Jul 1, 2015 3:26 pm • linkreport

@Scoot and @CBF

IMO, it's almost pointless to debate elevated versus subway. I think Hogan was going to cancel this thing no matter what.

The Baltimore Red Line got a project justification rating medium-high rating from the FTA and an budget allocation of $900 million, similar to that of the Purple Line.

http://www.fta.dot.gov/documents/FY15_Annual_Report_3_3_14_final.pdf

I hope that the MTA takes its plans and archives them for when a more transit friendly administration takes the helm. I also hope the city of Baltimore keeps the Red Line on its long term plans for the future as well.

by Paul J. Meissner in The Baltimore Red Line does need a tunnel, despite its cost on Jul 1, 2015 3:22 pm • linkreport

@ Scoot and @rosita

I like coming to GGW on an almost daily basis.

There is some diversity sure, but that's more or less in the comments section. Rosita knows this pretty well :)

But, the articles themselves are written almost entirely from the POV of a millenial living carless in DC who bikes to work and uses Uber on the weekends.

About 85% - 90% of the Washington Metro Area lives outside of the District and the vast majority of them people drive to work, and it would be interesting to read some articles from that point of view.

by Paul J. Meissner in "Convincing" and "enjoyable" "even with the wonkiness" on Jul 1, 2015 3:11 pm • linkreport

@John: the silver line isn't even finished yet. The point of the silver line is to get people to Tysons, not to get them to DC. Since most of the parts that connect people to Tysons (reston/herndon/loudoun) haven't been built yet, it's kinda premature to say it isn't working. The biggest problem at the moment is the rolling stock shortage, and it would have been colossally stupid to keep a completed silver line shut down until all the rail cars showed up.

by Mike in Metro floats cutting service for the Green, Yellow, Orange, and Silver Lines on Jul 1, 2015 3:03 pm • linkreport

@ CBF - yes, I have. Seems like you're implying that if I were to just visit the neighborhood then I would agree with your opinions on the matter.

by Scoot in The Baltimore Red Line does need a tunnel, despite its cost on Jul 1, 2015 2:56 pm • linkreport

@rosita

I've been following GGW for the past 5 or 6 years and I think the posts have become more diverse and also more measured. Back in the day, like 2009 or 2010, there were some weirdly zealous and out of touch posts. Since then I think with the number of added contributors the tone has become a lot more mature. I'm not sure I'd say that today the posts span the entire spectrum of ideas, to me it seems more like they discuss different ways to achieve the same paradoxical end goal (both more socialism and more libertarianism).

by Scoot in "Convincing" and "enjoyable" "even with the wonkiness" on Jul 1, 2015 2:52 pm • linkreport

The planners of the SL were supposed to predict the Japanese Tsunami? With such foreknowledge they could have made a killing shorting Japanese stocks, and paid back all the govts for their investments in the line.

by CrossingBrooklynFerry in Metro floats cutting service for the Green, Yellow, Orange, and Silver Lines on Jul 1, 2015 2:52 pm • linkreport

"I think that may just be an artifact of the types of development and the human traffic that occurs around such transit stations."

Not just the stations, but anyplace immediately adjacent to the el itself between stations.

"Certainly aesthetics and noise are considerations for some people, but that doesn't mean that an underground tunnel is "needed"."

As I said above, it is costs and benefits. I am very skeptical the costs and benefits could favor an el, for the reasons I have given.

"Also -- as to historic character ... if you really wanted to return these neighborhoods to their original character then you probably would build an elevated line, or at least a light rail, running right through them. Since that is what existed in these neighborhoods for decades before those rails were torn down to build subways."

Fells Point never had an elevated railroad. Rail lines there ran on the surface. A surface Red Line could probably be historically compatible (I mentioned history on wrt an El) but then you have to deal with the added transit time for the Red line itself, as well as impact on motorists, pedestrians, and cyclists.

Scoot - have you ever walked around on Fleet Stret in Fells Point?

by CrossingBrooklynFerry in The Baltimore Red Line does need a tunnel, despite its cost on Jul 1, 2015 2:48 pm • linkreport

Wonkiness? A terrible word to describe a good site.

by Theo16 in "Convincing" and "enjoyable" "even with the wonkiness" on Jul 1, 2015 2:45 pm • linkreport

@John: But don't you feel it was worth it to connect Downtown and the biggest suburban CBD in the country to Dulles airport? But yeah I agree that the Silver Line was not well planned and should have included a new Potomac crossing. Now it's just cramming more people down the same tunnel making problems worse for Orange and Blue line users. :(

by rosita in Metro floats cutting service for the Green, Yellow, Orange, and Silver Lines on Jul 1, 2015 2:43 pm • linkreport

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