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Amanda, even if all that is true, I don't see THIS plaza as the place to look for park space, or playing fields, or tree canopy.

by David C in The peculiar fight over density at the Bethesda Metro on Jul 23, 2016 10:49 pm • linkreport

@Arthur ^ Rockville Pike is where most of the truly authentic Chinese food in the area is today. I live in East Rockville, a neighborhood on the other side of the Metro and MARC/Amtrak tracks from Rockville Town Center. While the neighborhood is historically African-American and White (and Latino since the '70s/'80s), more and more Chinese have bought homes in order to be walking distance to the Chinese markets, restaurants, and doctors on 355.

by Leo Wagner in Not everyone agrees on where DC's Chinatown is on Jul 23, 2016 5:05 pm • linkreport

@Ed: Crime has been in steady decline since the 1990s. Crime rates now have returned to the levels of the 1960s. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crime_in_the_United_States

@jobby It's always conservatives who want to silence political talk. I wonder why that is.

by Michael Rogers in Trump claims to want to save our cities, but his and his party's policies would do the opposite on Jul 23, 2016 9:39 am • linkreport

Really? Nothing better to write about? Please spare us and keep it relevant. Regardless if your a leftist, not interested on your political opinions.

By the way - Trump knows more about developing cities than anyone in DC.

by jobby in Trump claims to want to save our cities, but his and his party's policies would do the opposite on Jul 23, 2016 7:07 am • linkreport

It is all so bizarre, Trump etc.; I cannot turn my head to look at it.

by NE John in Trump claims to want to save our cities, but his and his party's policies would do the opposite on Jul 23, 2016 6:49 am • linkreport

Even more tax giveaways and welfare to the rich and even more debt and loss for the rest of us. That is the only behavior the GOP knows. The lies told to buy votes have no meaning at all.

by Andrew W in Trump claims to want to save our cities, but his and his party's policies would do the opposite on Jul 23, 2016 6:19 am • linkreport

This minority will be voting Trump. Crime is going up and liberals seem content of sweeping it under the rug. They also stand with rabble rousers like BLM against cops. I could never vote for a party that does that.

by Ed in Trump claims to want to save our cities, but his and his party's policies would do the opposite on Jul 23, 2016 5:57 am • linkreport

David I have spent the last 6 months working on the Plan almost full time as a neighborhood representative. The "mathematical error" for tree canopy was almost the least of the errors. Even the 14% includes locations that they didn't realize they don't actually have jurisdiction over. And yes downtown Bethesda has a very low tree canopy compared to other desirable downtown areas - they identified that in the Planning Departments Bethesda Briefing Book and this Plan. Yet they often leave no room for trees - look at Element 28 and the trail in between Chopt and Ourimsan (just a few crape myrtles on the other side of the trail) and they allow sculptures of trees (I am not kidding) to count towards public amenities.
In addition - There are issues with the Plan boundary. They got almost every single road classification (made them business instead of residential) wrong for our neighborhood. We pointed it out to them - and they changed them only recently after many decisions had been made. They said it was an oversight. Big oversight. They had recommended building heights wrong by over 100 feet 2 years into the process. They NEVER bothered to even look in person, made major decisions, and then when it was pointed out to them Casey Anderson and Gwen Wright said it was a "factual misunderstanding" (about the size of blocks and roads and homes). It is still not corrected because Norman Dreyfuss and Amy Presley didn't want to change them. They have no real way to aquire the parks (the PIP will barely cover the cost of even getting a few of the recommended ones - let alone all of them.) If you look at the map of proposed parks it looks green - but if you look at the actual acres proposed they are tiny - and keep in mind none of those besides perhaps the sliver by Mon Ami Gabi (if the County does buy it) are truly guaranteed. The only reason the County wants that is for Purple line construction. We will be at a net loss of parks and green space if they turn Lynbrook back into a school, they are removing half the trees at BCC for construction and barely replacing a third back, and the endless clearcutting this County allows (everywhere) means we will forever be at a net loss of trees.

And when Plans are approved they aren't any more careful. Do you know what the big columns taking up half the "public open space" in the middle of sidewalk are outside the Lauren? Did you see that they approved the building with Harris Teeter grocery store and neglected to put in space for delivery trucks to turn around? Thus they now have to close Woodmont Ave in both directions every time there is a delivery.

by Amanda in The peculiar fight over density at the Bethesda Metro on Jul 23, 2016 4:59 am • linkreport

Definitely a fan of open-gangway, and definitely not a fan of mixed-consist cars. Not that Metro really needs the extra capacity right now, given that it has been losing riders for a few years. Maybe once it has recovered from its slide?

As for EOTR development - damn, that's quite a bit of new dev. Hopefully the ANCs are ready for it. That said, @William I'd love to know what's out-of-date, as I haven't been following that neighborhood for a while.

by David Edmondson in Breakfast links: Build that housing on Jul 23, 2016 1:12 am • linkreport

It was a "mathematical error."

Alright, well, that happens in drafts. Still, their plan is to increase the tree canopy by 14%, and it's not clear that the downtown had too few trees. But if it does, there are better places to get more than on top of the Metro Station.

piling too much building into too little space with not enough supporting infrastructure does not make a great place.

That's true by definition.

What isn't clear is if this development is truly too dense, or if this plan, which seeks to add parks and trees (not sure about schools or roads - but then they are adding transportation options in the form of the Purple Line and a bike trail that will be better for transportation) and other infrastructure fails to plan for enough.

by David C in The peculiar fight over density at the Bethesda Metro on Jul 22, 2016 11:57 pm • linkreport

Wouldn't someone who's built the majority of his success on urban properties be pro-infastructure, pro transit, pro city? I'm obviously excluding rural golf courses and his vineyard, but the suburban/urban towers, Miami golf resorts etc. A marked regression in refining urban governance would only hurt his long term interests. As far as comparing him to the GOP establishment, it's a bit premature given he's never been in public office. The "GOP establishment" is above Paul, Reince etc and starts at the very top anyway. Should he win, he can re-align the party goals since he'll have both the aforementioned gentleman by their, well, manhood. Any efforts by those two to not go along with him (to a point, obviously) would only hurt the GOP in the long term. Now that it's official and his VP pick is in place it will be interesting to see how he takes certain positions moving forward, and the strength of his points as well.

TL;DR - Donald Trump is the republican candidate for president, he is not "GOP Establishment". See his hand before calling his bluff.

by Rick in Trump claims to want to save our cities, but his and his party's policies would do the opposite on Jul 22, 2016 11:32 pm • linkreport

I always thought DC's Chinatown is actually in Rockville.

by Arthur in Not everyone agrees on where DC's Chinatown is on Jul 22, 2016 10:01 pm • linkreport

I'm not defending either candidate.

The GOP platform, honestly, is wingnut grab bag. It also wants:

- Bible studies as an elective in secondary school.
- Public displays of the Ten Commandments.
- In regard to the Newtown lawsuit against gunmakers: "We condemn frivolous lawsuits against gun
manufacturers." (It doesn't mention Newtown, but the implication is clear.)
- It opposes United States v. Windsor and sees marriage as man & woman only.
- Churches should be able participate politically without loss of tax exempt status.

I'm not defending Trump here. But he's a New Yorker in construction. He may know zip about NATO, but my hunch is he understands infrastructure.

If he reads the GOP platform, I'd be surprised.

Anyway, it's Congress. The anti-urban forces are already running everything.

The Democratic platform is much the same. Sure, it calls for big investments in infrastructure and just about anything else you can think of.

-

by kob in Trump claims to want to save our cities, but his and his party's policies would do the opposite on Jul 22, 2016 8:43 pm • linkreport

I'm looking through the passage you cite for the "anti-urban" part and not finding it.

Rather, the platform simply is decrying a federal government that explicitly means to encourage or, yes, compel people to live in a certain way that many of them do not favor. Ray LaHood actually did advocate a policy to "coerce people out of their cars." Not encourage, not entice, not liberate them from cars they longed to leave behind -- but coerce.

The part you quote would be anti-urban if it swore to punish people for living in cities, or to make it hard by design to do so. It would be anti-urban if it sought to shut down Uber, for example, or imposed zoning codes or saddled rotten monopoly public school systems on cities. These things are done, to be sure, but generally not by the wishes of conservatives but in defiance of them.

Cities have advantages for some uses and appeal to some people. If you say it is anti-urban to oppose federal programs that nudge or shove people into moving to cities against their native preferences, this betrays a lack of faith in those advantages and that appeal.

by I Also 95 in Trump claims to want to save our cities, but his and his party's policies would do the opposite on Jul 22, 2016 7:54 pm • linkreport

wrt the S line or any other "bus line family" you have to count the total. The variants are part of the whole. Eg., X2 line, 90s, 70s, S, 50s, 30s, etc. are line families, while the 60s buses are too disparate in the areas that they cover to call them a family, so those lines should be counted separately e.g. 62/63 separate from 64.

by Richard Layman in Is a gondola across the Potomac realistic? We're about to find out. on Jul 22, 2016 7:41 pm • linkreport

To play devil's advocate, hasn't he pledged to increase infrastructure spending?

Hasnt he pledged to increase a lot of spending, while also dramatically cutting taxes? It doesnt add up.

The party itself has always been anti-urban but most of the presidential nominees have had to walk the line to appeal to urban voters in order to win certain states.

The republican party is was founded in 1854. I dont think they were always anti-urban. Until the "Great Society" programs and the white flight from the cities, I think they were pretty neutral on rural vs urban.

by Richard B in Trump claims to want to save our cities, but his and his party's policies would do the opposite on Jul 22, 2016 7:03 pm • linkreport

I wouldn't conclude that the GOP will do something contrary to Trump, because Trump has shown amazing power to remake the GOP. He is already moving a big chunk of policies into Trump territory.

Therefore, we should also look to what Trump says. Here, the problem is that Trump says and promises everything, but is not so much about the delivery. Its a lot of rainbows and unicorns if you vote for him, and fear and loathing if you don't. I'd look to any actual concrete policies. There are none.

by SJE in Trump claims to want to save our cities, but his and his party's policies would do the opposite on Jul 22, 2016 6:17 pm • linkreport

I am hardly anti-development. I like well planned cities. Bethesda is not one of them. Nor does it ever stand a chance to be with the way this new plan is written. Again, piling too much building into too little space with not enough supporting infrastructure does not make a great place. It may be dense, and near a Metro - but not much else. And waiting 10-20 years for promised infrastructure to support the development that has been allowed to occur is hardly "smart" growth or sustainable.

by Amanda in The peculiar fight over density at the Bethesda Metro on Jul 22, 2016 5:31 pm • linkreport

[This comment has been deleted for violating the comment policy.]

by Chris T in Not everyone agrees on where DC's Chinatown is on Jul 22, 2016 5:19 pm • linkreport

GGW, please don't descend into playing politics.

I'll keep it short. While I'm not a Trump supporter, you cannot call him a hypocrite for saying things that are inconsistent with republican party positions. He is their candidate purely for electoral reasons. Half the party has disowned him, and he makes no qualms about going against the party line when it suits him. Therefore the premise of this article is faulty.

by Chris T in Trump claims to want to save our cities, but his and his party's policies would do the opposite on Jul 22, 2016 5:17 pm • linkreport

Also that insistence gives those opposed to development an incentive to block the new infra as a way to head it off. Since folks who are anti-development are also often anti-transit, anti-bike lane, etc, it creates some very bad incentives.

by CrossingBrooklynFerry in The peculiar fight over density at the Bethesda Metro on Jul 22, 2016 5:11 pm • linkreport

"Not compounding the problems with more and more development and playing catch-up for years and even decades. "

When you insist on infra before development, you get situations like Metroway, where people complain about an underutilized BRT line (since development has not yet caught up) or like other proposed BRT lines in NoVa, where developers get behind them, and then people complain that they are being built at the behest of developers.

We could call it the NIMBY Catch 22.

by CrossingBrooklynFerry in The peculiar fight over density at the Bethesda Metro on Jul 22, 2016 5:10 pm • linkreport

One thing to note is that the bit about replacing civil engineering with social engineering and the xclusively urban vision of dense housing and government transit also appears verbatim in the 2012 Republican Platform.

I think this definitely reflects the trend in the last 6-8 years of the outsize influence of anti-urban factions within the Republican party. The party itself has always been anti-urban but most of the presidential nominees have had to walk the line to appeal to urban voters in order to win certain states. So it's not uncommon to see that sort of disconnect between the party platform and the nominee.

However it is notable that in past platforms at least some lip service is paid to mass transit and urban investments, and the 2016 platform seeks to roll that back.

by Scoot in Trump claims to want to save our cities, but his and his party's policies would do the opposite on Jul 22, 2016 5:00 pm • linkreport

One thing I've always found interesting is how people both encourage and discourage racial segregated in the U.S. simultaneously.

On one hand we say segregation is bad. Then when areas like DC's Chinatown become racially integrated we say it's bad because the culture is getting lost. Which one is it? Can we make up our minds?

by Peter in Not everyone agrees on where DC's Chinatown is on Jul 22, 2016 4:47 pm • linkreport

I can't imagine where they will create their pickup/dropoff location, unless it's in the Days Inn parking lot. Parking is very tight at the Shops at Pershing, and stopping a lane of traffic on Arlington Blvd would be ridiculous. Pedestrian crossing Arlington Blvd at Pershing is also somewhat dangerous considering many drivers are going through that area at 60-70mph.

by Andrew Kovacs in Arlington's Fort Myer will soon be much more bike and pedestrian friendly on Jul 22, 2016 4:44 pm • linkreport

The tree canopy cover was not reduced from a 294% increase to a 14% increase because of the HPA. I spoke directly to planning staff about this issue. The other 280% increase was not/is not covered in the area outside outside of the HPA. They aren't even giving that area a goal number anymore. It was a "mathematical error." Like so many of the other errors in the Plan. They don't even have a way to actually implement their green sounding "canopy corridors." So much of this Plan is a joke.

by Amanda in The peculiar fight over density at the Bethesda Metro on Jul 22, 2016 4:38 pm • linkreport

Fact don't matter. Reason doesn't matter. What feels matters:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NqOTxl3Bsbw#t=1m59s

by Jasper in Trump claims to want to save our cities, but his and his party's policies would do the opposite on Jul 22, 2016 4:28 pm • linkreport

I don't know the data of water quality on individual locations along the river, but these water quality issues are systemic and are the result of decades of pollution that affect the streams and tributaries along pretty much the entire river within most or all of MoCo and Arlington County -- so a few miles is not going to make a world of difference.

That being said, these are not absolutes -- plenty of people swim and boat in the Potomac and don't get sick.

by Scoot in Is a gondola across the Potomac realistic? We're about to find out. on Jul 22, 2016 4:26 pm • linkreport

To play devil's advocate, hasn't he pledged to increase infrastructure spending?

by Chester B. in Trump claims to want to save our cities, but his and his party's policies would do the opposite on Jul 22, 2016 4:24 pm • linkreport

The green box matches what i leaned as Chinatown growing up here -- that's the area that has, well had, English and Chinese signage.

by dcseain in Not everyone agrees on where DC's Chinatown is on Jul 22, 2016 4:14 pm • linkreport

It's not really a bargain when an arbitrator, such as Ezio E. Borchini here, misapplies the law and grants the union too much authority. How else can one reasonably write that misconduct justifies a 180-day suspension in order to be rehabilitative but "was not so serious as to be disruptive of the employment relationship"? WMATA now has to keep a position open and unfilled for 6 months while this employee rehabilitates himself. Absurd.

by 7r3y3r in Breakfast links: Build that housing on Jul 22, 2016 4:10 pm • linkreport

Again, though, my impression is that lots of people kayak in the vicinity of Great Falls, for example, without following the rules you listed, even after lots of direct contact with river water. I am not suggesting swimming from Rosslyn to Georgetown is a viable transportation option, but I suspect that recreational swimming, if not viable at Rosslyn yet, is probably viable not that far upstream from Rosslyn.

by CrossingBrooklynFerry in Is a gondola across the Potomac realistic? We're about to find out. on Jul 22, 2016 3:55 pm • linkreport

When a public employee union "bargains" with management, the game is rigged, because the labor-friendly politicians who run Metro want to appease the unions, and they rely on them for political support. And when it comes to paying out lavish compensation, agreeing to unproductive work rules, making it nigh impossible to terminate bad apples. it's the public that gets stuck with higher taxes, higher fares, and crappy service. The stockholders won't dump their shares, and the plant's in no danger of being moved to Mexico. (It does seem not even WMATA is indispensable. Customers are voting with their feet.) A private-sector union knows it has to strike a balance between its demands and the long-term health of the outfit. Not so in the public sector. Management / labor negotiations should be adversarial.

by Paul in Breakfast links: Build that housing on Jul 22, 2016 3:51 pm • linkreport

He's just trying to dupe people, especially minorities.... we can see the truth, the GOP isnt good for the nation. too conservative.

by Jashirr Garcia in Trump claims to want to save our cities, but his and his party's policies would do the opposite on Jul 22, 2016 3:46 pm • linkreport

@Frank

Unions are still do a great job fighting appropriate and justifiable disciplinary action against members who commit fraud (e.g. maintenance workers, safety inspectors) or even murder (police who kill unarmed, restrained civilians). If you don't like doing your job, want to commit fraud or commit murder, by all means, join a union. They're powerful, and yes, they still own the Democrat elites.

by DCwalks in Breakfast links: Build that housing on Jul 22, 2016 3:40 pm • linkreport

would seem to suggest the only Va jurisdiction with CSOs in the Potomac watershed is the City of Alexandria, and that would certainly be downstream from the Key Bridge.

That could be. Of course we do have to keep in mind that urbanization affects the river's water quality in other ways than just sewage overflow.

by Scoot in Is a gondola across the Potomac realistic? We're about to find out. on Jul 22, 2016 3:32 pm • linkreport

Scoot -- my understanding is that the S bus line is in excess of 20,000 daily riders post the addition of more service at night and more articulated buses.

That could be the case if you include all 6 (?) routes of the S line and use weekday ridership figures.

The existing Circulator line (which goes all the way to Dupont) and the GUTS bus routes that serve Rosslyn see a total of about 4k riders per day -- 2.5k for the circulator (according to the dashboard), 1.5k for the GUTS (2008 Georgetown Transportation Study, pg. 80).

I predict that the gondola would capture some of the existing GUTS and Circulator ridership, but how much is unclear? The Circulator and the GUTS would surely beat the gondola on fare price and likely on convenience. I decided not to include 38B ridership because I think the gondola would capture a negligble number of those riders but I could be wrong.

So 5k ridership would seem to be a very optimistic figure unless a lot of that ridership was from tourists.

by Scoot in Is a gondola across the Potomac realistic? We're about to find out. on Jul 22, 2016 3:29 pm • linkreport

Incredibly well done video

by JJJJ in This video compares LA's streets of 70 years ago to today's on Jul 22, 2016 3:18 pm • linkreport

Unions had their use and their day, but state and federal laws are so "worker protective" at this point...

Except in Wisconsin and in the south, of course

by Chester B. in Breakfast links: Build that housing on Jul 22, 2016 3:18 pm • linkreport

@enjoymoreradio,

"Blah,blah,blah, bargaining rights. Pretty soon he will be "bargaining" with another employer who only wants to pay him minimum wage because that's what his skill set is worth.

Unions had their use and their day, but state and federal laws are so "worker protective" at this point, unions exist only to collect dues, and every time they do a poor job of picking their battles (like this), they only prove how useless and irrelevant they've become. This guy and the bulk of the ATU membership are people making far more, in salary and benefits than their skill sets are worth, and instead of just showing up and doing a passable job, they all decide to give the rest of us the middle finger on a daily basis.

The ATU and its membership need to learn they aren't untouchable little snowflakes.

by Frank in Breakfast links: Build that housing on Jul 22, 2016 3:10 pm • linkreport

One thing is true - Bethesda is a very constrained location. They are trying to stuff too much in an area that was never intended to support it all. Sustainability and smart growth should be about providing desperately needed infrastructure before and during development. Not compounding the problems with more and more development and playing catch-up for years and even decades. Things like new lights on Wisconsin still not turned on for two years, neighbors begging for years for safe crosswalks and intersections to be able to enter/exit their neighborhoods, bike lanes promised 20 years ago yet still not there, no new public parks in Bethesda in 20 years, 24/7 noise pollution from Walter Reed that the officials have spent weeks even trying to identify, let alone fix, chronically overcrowded schools, a chronically broken Metro. The only thing actually being "sustained" by the County's Planning Board and new Sector Plan and buildings such as these are the developers.

by Amanda in The peculiar fight over density at the Bethesda Metro on Jul 22, 2016 3:01 pm • linkreport

You say the unions are rigging the rules. I say they are exercising the rights that they and their employer bargained for.

by enjoymoreradio in Breakfast links: Build that housing on Jul 22, 2016 2:50 pm • linkreport

IIRC, Chinatown used to be Greektown/Little Italy until the old Convention Center moved into the old Chinatown and residents moved south and displaced the Greeks and Italians.

by Lurker in Not everyone agrees on where DC's Chinatown is on Jul 22, 2016 2:44 pm • linkreport

Scoot

This http://www.virginiaplaces.org/waste/cso.html

would seem to suggest the only Va jurisdiction with CSOs in the Potomac watershed is the City of Alexandria, and that would certainly be downstream from the Key Bridge.

by CrossingBrooklynFerry in Is a gondola across the Potomac realistic? We're about to find out. on Jul 22, 2016 2:43 pm • linkreport

Scoot -- my understanding is that the S bus line is in excess of 20,000 daily riders post the addition of more service at night and more articulated buses.

by Richard Layman in Is a gondola across the Potomac realistic? We're about to find out. on Jul 22, 2016 2:29 pm • linkreport

yep, that was pretty ludicrous, but shows the limitations of stock data in doing retail location analysis.

... the first major new store on H St. after the unveiling of the 2003 Renaissance Plan was a Family Dollar.

It takes a long time for data to catch up to reality on the ground and upward trajectories.

by Richard Layman in In 1979, was your neighborhood "sound" or "distressed"? on Jul 22, 2016 2:28 pm • linkreport

the City Paper had a nice piece a couple years ago, with photos and translations for 10 of the signs on non-Chinese stores/restaurants in Chinatown.

Yes, Chinatown has been diminished for years. I've written about it in the past. If that crappy social housing building hadn't been constructed, it'd be long gone, except for a couple restaurants, because almost no one lives there.

WRT Payton's comment, he wrote a great piece years ago on his blog on the continuation of Chinatown in Chicago.

by Richard Layman in Not everyone agrees on where DC's Chinatown is on Jul 22, 2016 2:25 pm • linkreport

That "Chinatown" doesn't exist at all seems disrespectful to the very real Chinese people who do exist in DC's Chinatown, and for whom Chinatown is not just a place for outsiders to play restaurant critic. Many current and former neighborhood residents (including my great-uncle) were interviewed for this project.

by Payton Chung in Not everyone agrees on where DC's Chinatown is on Jul 22, 2016 2:22 pm • linkreport

Here is a video of the New Angels Flight in downtown LA. It was moved a few blocks from the Kiss Me Deadly location.

by Brett Young in This video compares LA's streets of 70 years ago to today's on Jul 22, 2016 2:09 pm • linkreport

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