Greater Greater Washington

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And, all of those values and concerns are reflected in the new document in a much easier to use format that the current zoning regulations, at least that is the consensus for everyone who has testified in favor of it, including the many stakeholders, ANC Commissioners, etc. who had input on it.

However, I suppose the issues raised by OtherMike will be the new goalposts that someone at OP or the Zoning Commission will have to explain a billion times between now and September, unless or until the deadline for public comment is moved again.

by William in Today's problems were visible decades ago, but zoning has blocked solutions ever since on Apr 24, 2014 5:55 am • linkreport

The M Street underpass is usually dripping. Is it by design as necessary drainage for the trackbed or would they plug it?

by Turnip in Can NoMa turn dank underpasses into lively public spaces? on Apr 24, 2014 5:01 am • linkreport

Each overlay defines its objectives and gives the relevant standards including the standards for review. These are the standards that the BZA or ZC uses in determining whether to allow proposed projects.

The Naval Observatory Precinct Overlay District is described in two pages of text in the current regulations (Sections 1531-1534), which describes clearly the purposes for which it was established and additional regulations that apply to the properties in that overlay district. It provides clarity to people who choose to live, open businesses or purchase property in that area.

A landowner or prospective landowner can look at the two pages for the overlay and see what conditions are specific to that area. For example, the NO Overlay District has a strict height limit (40 feet, for all zones) and PUDs are not allowed any bonus height. In the NO Overlay District, PUDs cannot exceed the 40 foot height limit or other MOR limits in that area. As with other overlays, to understand the other applicable regulations, one would need to consult the relevant chapter(s) for the underlying zone (Chapters 2 and 4 for R-1-A and R-1-B, Chapters 3 and 4 for R-3 and R-5-A, and Chapter 7 for C-2-A), as well as some general sections, such as the chapters for parking, loading, and IZ.

The clarity of the objectives and standards is lost when the rules are broken out and written separately in individual, unrelated zones scattered throughout a nearly one-thousand page document.

As with all regulations, when looking at the applicable regulations, it is also necessary to master the definitions in Chapter 1, and be familiar with the relevant (BZA or ZC) procedures for any applications.

Generally, zoning isn’t just about what a particular landowner can do with his or her property, but with how the regulations shape an area. It is a mechanism for creating certain types of environments, diverse environments. The regulations should be viewed not just through the eyes of potential developers, but also through the eyes of someone who lives in a neighborhood or is choosing a neighborhood to live in.

And overlays are a tool that is used to protect and perpetuate attributes of a particular environment that is valued and also possibly at risk, including, for example, trees and slopes, views, historic scale or neighborhood serving retail.

by OtherMike in Today's problems were visible decades ago, but zoning has blocked solutions ever since on Apr 24, 2014 12:20 am • linkreport

"Yep, there's a reason the pedestrian traffic in Silver Spring is usually focused on Ellsworth and Fenton. Colesville and Georgia need a road diet." by Nick

So people make a city area "walkable" and then people walk it, and then that's seen as a failure?

by asffa in Montgomery County added 100,000 residents since 2002, but driving didn't increase on Apr 23, 2014 11:34 pm • linkreport

Montreal has shopping malls underground in the subway, where people can enjoy them without going into the cold.

by asffa in Can NoMa turn dank underpasses into lively public spaces? on Apr 23, 2014 11:19 pm • linkreport

Ethan So no roads will be closed or repurposed on 355?

by asffa in Montgomery County added 100,000 residents since 2002, but driving didn't increase on Apr 23, 2014 11:08 pm • linkreport

"Opportunistic groups such as Sierra Club/ACT will not hesitate to fabricate lies to kill transportation infrastructure in America."
by Cyrus
so will "Smart Growth" committees.

by asffa in Montgomery County added 100,000 residents since 2002, but driving didn't increase on Apr 23, 2014 11:07 pm • linkreport

No, there are no plans to close or repurpose any driving lanes north of the beltway.

by Ethan in Montgomery County added 100,000 residents since 2002, but driving didn't increase on Apr 23, 2014 11:02 pm • linkreport

aces- That wasn't in rent control originally. It was added about the time the LaTrobe was built.

by Tom Coumaris in Today's problems were visible decades ago, but zoning has blocked solutions ever since on Apr 23, 2014 10:56 pm • linkreport

Ethan Is the plan to close half the driving lanes?

by asffa in Montgomery County added 100,000 residents since 2002, but driving didn't increase on Apr 23, 2014 10:54 pm • linkreport

Tom Coumaris: I've heard rent control blamed for the long hiatus in multifamily construction, but I find that hard to believe, given that the law exempted *all* new construction going forward.

by aces in Today's problems were visible decades ago, but zoning has blocked solutions ever since on Apr 23, 2014 9:49 pm • linkreport

Rockville continues to work on its plan for an improved 355 with wider, safer sidewalks, better pedestrian crossings, and separate bike lanes, among other changes. There has been room for public comment and I believe will be more once the planning board releases its version of the Rockville's Pike plan. There should also be opportunity to coordinate BRT with upgrades to TOD--it's worth speaking up to make sure this happens. The fact that the 55 bus is so well used despite poor conditions along 355 shows great possibility for the future. The 46 bus, which serves 355 south of Rockville Station, is undependable and inadequate; better service there would likely attract a large number of passengers. I expect a really attractive, well run BRT to exceed projected passenger numbers.

by Ethan in Montgomery County added 100,000 residents since 2002, but driving didn't increase on Apr 23, 2014 9:42 pm • linkreport

@ Navid:By that logic the median of I-95 is a great place to put rail. I can assure you it absolutely is not.

While the placing is not optimal, rail in the median of I-66 is doing quite well.

Also, I am pretty sure that a metro line (let's call it the Pink Line) in the median (or on top of) I-395 and I-95 to Woodbridge and Frederickburg would be a huge success. Start at the Pentagon (or some other side of town but that's besides the point) and stop at Air Force HQ (or whatever replaces that), Shirlington, VA-7, Mark Center, Landmark, Edsall Rd, Springfield Mall, Franconia-Springfield, Newington, Lorton, Woodbridge, Potomac Hell and further.

It would save all travelers from the south the swing by Alexandria and Reagan and provide people further out with a straight shot at the Pentagon.

I am pretty confident this line will be built at some point, considering that the density exists along 395, and VA just committed itself to not widening I-95 for another 75 years (thank you HOT lanes). So, growth must come from transit. Problems is, that fiscal conservative folks will make travelers in this area suffer for another 40 years before the obvious will have become undeniable.

The economic loss and time waste will be huge.

by Jasper in Breakfast links: More travel on Apr 23, 2014 8:33 pm • linkreport

Can anyone explain how the Metrorail ridership numbers are calculated? The report says average weekday ridership is 27,360, but total average weekday boardings at the county's stations are something like 80,000. Does the "ridership" number only include trips starting and ending within the county?

by jimble in Montgomery County added 100,000 residents since 2002, but driving didn't increase on Apr 23, 2014 8:27 pm • linkreport

Well, overall I think it's a good plan.

Naturally some could always complain of better cross county service (or lack of), I think it's good considering Fairfax's established development patterns.

Now as far as specific projects?

I live on Route 1 in SE FairCo so naturally I am most interested in the Route 1 AA study, naturally I'd like Metro down here but we shall see.

Apparently they want to expand the Blue Line. I do agree that putting it down to Potomac Mills is silly. The furthest it should go is Lorton and maybe meet up as a dual Blue and Yellow line terminus.

Ill be very interested to see what sort of transit they choose for Route 7. It'd be nice to have a one transfer trip to Tysons if it goes to King Street, but that'll be REALLY tough.

by Billy Bob in Fairfax's answer to neighbors' transit plans: Light rail, streetcars, and BRT on Apr 23, 2014 8:18 pm • linkreport

Thanks to the others who beat me to it. I would only add that the only real need for someone to see the whole picture as OtherMike has suggested is if they want to sound authoritative in something that they have no real, practical experience using for themselves or on behalf of clients.

The anti-ZRR activists are using OtherMike's arguments to make themselves sound impressive when in fact, for city staffers, attorneys, developers and most (but not all) ANC Commissioners and others who deal in land use and zoning, the new code is far easier to use.

Sure, if someone needs to take a snapshot of an entire neighborhood, then there is some cross-referencing that needs to happen, but that needs to happen now, but in a much harder to use format.

I think part of the problem is that certain members of the original task force who are very comfortable with the current code do not want change because it will force them to have to re-learn some elements to stay on top of the situation. However, for the 99+% of the rest of us, the new code, particularly if it is online and cross referenced in a digital manner, will be a lot easier to digest.

by William in Today's problems were visible decades ago, but zoning has blocked solutions ever since on Apr 23, 2014 7:10 pm • linkreport

King Terrapin, Okay! nice to know some actually go fast
MLD - I don't know who FRA is, but if it's necessary, then they may need to have straps available to help tie the bikes in the last car. (Impossible!!)
And I hope people being able to take their bikes on the trains on off hours happens soon. seems reasonable.

by asffa in MARC's chief engineer wants to allow bikes on some weekend trains on Apr 23, 2014 7:06 pm • linkreport

When those kids grow up, what will happen?

by asffa in Montgomery County added 100,000 residents since 2002, but driving didn't increase on Apr 23, 2014 6:58 pm • linkreport

JES
It's not so slippery or terrible, if it can run them in the day, its even easier to do at night. Just let the bus stop at bus stops - late night there's no significant traffic, and it moves pretty well, and going to closed Metro stations isn't the most appealing thing. These riders likely rode into town on the Metro Red Line & just want a ride taking them close to home rather than stranded in DC in the middle of the night.
The "choice" non-riders dynamic who would avoid the bus if it spends 10 minutes longer en route to Wheaton are likely too old to go out late to DC and ride cabs there if they do. Bus riders are happier if the bus stops where they won't have to be walking as far so late, in the dark. Such concerns are legit and worth respect.

Reminder since this was put up here before, and not by me - EVERY study of such things shows people care more about how long they wait for the bus and how far away the bus stop is from them (time, convenience) then about how long it is to ride the bus. Long as people are riding home right, and not spending a long time in uncertainty, people are more patient.
Of course people like fast buses, but many passengers would lose any advantage of speed when they have to watch the bus take them miles away instead of stopping right near their route home.

Late night bus route DC to Wheaton - C2/C4 route centers is Wheaton. Said line draws about 10K rides a day according to a post by Dan Reed. Veirs Mill line is another busy. 16th Street is of course another big bus route, but that bus route ends in Silver Spring and been proposed for ages (make it so?) to continue further down Georgia to Wheaton Station, which is bus turf for so many.
Maybe eventually run some C2/4 buses late night (the line is already well known and popular) to coincide with 16th street late night DC to Wheaton extended routes.. Again this is all theory, but it'd be nice to at least get the DC>Wheaton ones in some time soon. :)

by asffa in Breakfast links: More travel on Apr 23, 2014 6:53 pm • linkreport

Um, yeah, that's a much better solution. For whatever reason, I had HOT lanes ending at Nutley and everything going to Vienna in my mind. Probably because I go to Vienna and I generally only think of myself.

Even if a bus has to merge back into traffic before Nutley, I'd guess Centreville (Stone Road Park and Ride) to Tysons in under 30 minutes is easily doable. With HOT lanes, a well-located park and ride lot in Gainesville could probably get to Tysons in 45 minutes.

I guess I just think about the idea that Fairfax wants Tysons to become a "downtown" and that it's already the 12th largest employment district in the country and that it should have more transit access than one heavy rail line, one light rail line, and a couple BRT lines. And maybe someday it will be more.

by jh in Fairfax's answer to neighbors' transit plans: Light rail, streetcars, and BRT on Apr 23, 2014 6:45 pm • linkreport

I challenge you to find a teacher who would accept "the difference between illusion and reality" or "the contrast between reason and emotion" as a valid answer to an open-ended question.

And there it is -- an "open-ended question" IS NOT A MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTION. Therein lies the problem with the testing culture in education.

I am a parent and a teacher, and I have major concerns about the "data movement" which was started under Bush and continues strongly under Obama.

I agree with the previous comment that corporate interests and business influence are a major factor. The author worked for K12 -- a for-profit company which "earns" money from state and local governments. I'm cynical.

by mch in DC's planned Common Core tests aren't yet ready for prime time on Apr 23, 2014 5:44 pm • linkreport

"Assuming Metro to Centreville is a distant dream, looks like the plan for I-66/Tysons transit is bus (hopefully BRT) to Vienna, Metro one stop to Dunn Loring, then LRT/BRT to Tysons (with possibly another transfer to the Silver Line). I don't think that's going to get people out of their car."

why wouldnt you just run an express bus in the BRT lane all the way to the beltway (assuming there is one from vienna to 495, otherwise it can go back into mixed traffic for that stretch) then up the HOT lane to Tysons? there is surely enough demand to support both routes to Vienna metro AND seperate routes to Tysons.

by AWalkerInTheCity in Fairfax's answer to neighbors' transit plans: Light rail, streetcars, and BRT on Apr 23, 2014 5:24 pm • linkreport

The Naval Observatory Overlay will include the following zones, R-11, R-12, R-13, A-6, M-28, so to describe the basics, you would need to refer to Chapter 6 of Subtitle D, Chapter 7 of Subtitle D, Chapter 17 of Subtitle D, Chapter 12 of Subtitle D, Chapter 15 of Subtitle D, Chapter 16 of Subtitle D, Chapter 17 of Subtitle D, Chapter 3 of Subtitle F, Chapter 7 of Subtitle F, Chapter 12 of Subtitle F, Chapter 7 of Subtitle G, Chapter 13 of Subtitle G, Chapter 14 of Subtitle G. [Multiples sections in most of these chapters.]

Here's the thing: Overlays are only relevant in how they impact the existing base zone. The overlay itself shouldn't matter; the real concern is about what is allowed on a given property.

There's no reason to ever want to 'describe the basics' of an overlay area. The purpose of an overlay was to provide specific regulations to that area. Those regulations are now included in the base zones, therefore the overlay is no longer needed (and only adds confusion). I'm not sure why someone would want to 'describe the basics' of an overlay zone. "Where was the old Naval Observatory Overlay Zone?" just isn't a very relevant question. The goal of the reorganization is to make other questions easier, like "what does the zoning on parcel 123 allow?"

by Alex B. in Today's problems were visible decades ago, but zoning has blocked solutions ever since on Apr 23, 2014 5:21 pm • linkreport

Looks like Tysons should have good access to and from Reston/Herndon, Arlington/DC, and points South like Springfield and Woodbridge. (I remember reading an article after the HOT lanes opened saying buses could get from Woodbridge to Tysons in 30 minutes. That's a fantastic improvement.) However, seems like locations out I-66 don't have a great solution to get to and from Tysons.

Assuming Metro to Centreville is a distant dream, looks like the plan for I-66/Tysons transit is bus (hopefully BRT) to Vienna, Metro one stop to Dunn Loring, then LRT/BRT to Tysons (with possibly another transfer to the Silver Line). I don't think that's going to get people out of their car.

by jh in Fairfax's answer to neighbors' transit plans: Light rail, streetcars, and BRT on Apr 23, 2014 5:13 pm • linkreport

Re: "U St Corridor" -- If I lived in a neighborhood where someone attached "corridor" to it, I'd try to change it pronto. "Corridor" suggests that some planner or other bureaucrat thinks you live in a place whose purpose is to push through large numbers of vehicles!

by Alf in Lunch links: From battle to building on Apr 23, 2014 5:09 pm • linkreport

Yessssssss :-)

by Justin..... in How'd you do in week 2 of whichWMATA? on Apr 23, 2014 5:04 pm • linkreport

I guessed Silver Spring for #5 but wasn't really satisfied with that answer. I always thought both tracks at Greenbelt were accessed from the north side of the station with an at-grade crossover like at Rockville

You are confusing Greenbelt with the stealth MARC station, College Park.

by Richard in How'd you do in week 2 of whichWMATA? on Apr 23, 2014 5:01 pm • linkreport

Woah, woah, when you look at a zillion different properties in an area, you have to look at multiple sections of the new code? Well it's a good thing the current code simply lets you look at one. Oh wait, it doesn't.

I think the complaint is that it's still "confusing" and "difficult" for the neighborhood activists to look at an entire neighborhood and figure out exactly what can happen everywhere. Well guess what? It's never going to be that way because that isn't how the code is used for day-to-day business. And the only way you could have a code that was easy to read in this manner is by making it overly restrictive.

The exact kind of nuance those against code changes are asking for necessitates a complex code.

by MLD in Today's problems were visible decades ago, but zoning has blocked solutions ever since on Apr 23, 2014 4:58 pm • linkreport

When we talk about the real impact of quality early childhood programming, it is important that we look at the programs that have had the strongest structures for examining longitudinal impacts on program participants, not only in terms of academic outcomes but in terms of overall life success - much of which is more linked to the child's social emotional competency than to their academic skills. Striking among such programs is the Abecedarian Project, initiated in 1972 to provide high quality child care and pre-k to children from disadvantaged families. At an age 30 follow-up, participants in the Abecedarian Project:
• Were 42% more likely to have been employed for at least 16 of the 24 months preceding the age-30 follow-up (75.0% of the Abecedarian group vs. 53.0% of the control group).
•Were 81% less likely to have received welfare for a total of nine months or more between the ages of 22.5 and 30 years (3.9% for the Abecedarian group vs. 20.4% for the control group).
•Were almost four times as likely to have graduated from college (23.1% for the Abecedarian group vs. 6.1% for the control group).
•Completed 1.2 more years of education (an average of 13.5 years for the Abecedarian group vs. 12.3 years for the control group).
•Were 1.8 years older when their first child was born (an average of 21.8 years of age for the Abecedarian group vs. 20.0 years of age for the control group).
For additional research on the ROI for early childhood education, check out Investing in Kids by economist Timothy Bartik. The evidence is incredibly strong that public investments in quality early childhood education have some of the strongest benefits to society, and this is true not only of access to Pre-k, but also in terms of improving access and quality of infant and toddler care and expanding home visiting programs. As Ms. Wexler points out, Pre-k is only part of the early childhood landscape. However, it is incredibly clear from the body of research that these investments pay off - not only in terms of their social impact but also for the economy as a whole.

by Cory M in DC may have universal access to preschool, but low-income kids need more than access on Apr 23, 2014 4:48 pm • linkreport

They might make sense in some places where there are huge gaps between stations, like at Potomac Yard between the airport and Braddock. I'm sure other cases could be made too, but it's a slippery slope because then everyone who uses the late buses will start to lobby for a stop closer to their end destination.

by JES in Breakfast links: More travel on Apr 23, 2014 4:42 pm • linkreport

It's not really worth arguing over semantics and I agree with the rest of your comment (the last line especially). I just read "transit" to mean generally transportation which does include driving (as the map obviously does as well).

by drumz in Fairfax's answer to neighbors' transit plans: Light rail, streetcars, and BRT on Apr 23, 2014 4:33 pm • linkreport

actually the map is specifically a quality transit network map. HOT lanes are included because its the county goal to leverage those HOT lanes with a network of express buses. Its a perfectly logical strategy, and given both the limited financial resources and the need to compromise with non-transit modes, its probably the best strategy for Fairfax.

We now have fast express bus service to Tysons on the beltway. There is simply no way we could have gotten a transit only lane on the beltway - or a rail line. Thats pie in the sky.

If we oppose transit in HOT lanes, we wont get BRT lanes as a result, we will get HOT lanes without transit.

by AWalkerInTheCity in Fairfax's answer to neighbors' transit plans: Light rail, streetcars, and BRT on Apr 23, 2014 4:28 pm • linkreport

But you have to do all of that now, it's just even more spread out!

Plus, you have to cross-reference everything and know all of the regulatory interpretations that have been harmonized by the rewrite.

What you're saying is that it's hard to understand a whole neighborhood at a glance. For an individual homeowner, looking to alter their property, it will be much simpler. And they won't have to go to BZA for half as many things.

Your list sounds impressive, but for people who work with the code, it will be much simpler.

by Neil Flanagan in Today's problems were visible decades ago, but zoning has blocked solutions ever since on Apr 23, 2014 4:19 pm • linkreport

Also this map is about both road/public transit projects. Again, the state seems to be taking an all of the above approach to transportation which means lots of road and transit projects.

by drumz in Fairfax's answer to neighbors' transit plans: Light rail, streetcars, and BRT on Apr 23, 2014 4:14 pm • linkreport

Neil, Yes, you are missing quite a bit.

The Naval Observatory Overlay will include the following zones, R-11, R-12, R-13, A-6, M-28, so to describe the basics, you would need to refer to Chapter 6 of Subtitle D, Chapter 7 of Subtitle D, Chapter 17 of Subtitle D, Chapter 12 of Subtitle D, Chapter 15 of Subtitle D, Chapter 16 of Subtitle D, Chapter 17 of Subtitle D, Chapter 3 of Subtitle F, Chapter 7 of Subtitle F, Chapter 12 of Subtitle F, Chapter 7 of Subtitle G, Chapter 13 of Subtitle G, Chapter 14 of Subtitle G. [Multiples sections in most of these chapters.]

In addition, you would need to master the definitions and rules in Subtitles A, B, and C, and the administrative regulations in Subtitles X, Y and Z, as they apply to the zones in the Naval Observatory Overlay area.

And I might have missed some of the relevant sections in my quick review.

Even if the scope of the question was limited to areas currently zoned R-5-A/NO, you have missed many of the relevant sections.

by OtherMike in Today's problems were visible decades ago, but zoning has blocked solutions ever since on Apr 23, 2014 4:09 pm • linkreport

"HOV lanes and HOT/Express Lanes are not the same"

HOT lanes also allow SOVs that pay a toll. That can finance a lane where an HOV lane could not be financed.

", and neither should be called transit."

its the express bus that runs on them thats transit

"Dedicated bus (BRT) lanes are obviously the superior option and actually fall under transit."

That depends on local conditions, including financing constraints. BTW, I took an express bus on the I395 HOV lanes this morning. I did not drive a car, and did not ride a bike, nor did I walk. what mode did I use, if a bus on an HOV lane is not transit?

" I was mostly referring to the Rte 1/Yellow Line extension study"

Eh. Im not sure when that was last formally studied. Anyway its more urgent now, after BRAC.

" It would take quite an imagination to truly believe that Tysons will actually look like that, even decades from now. To transform the area you need development, for development (especially the 200-400 ft development they want) you need demand.

With Northern Virginia vacancy rates at 15%+, the defense budget shrinking, GSA reducing sq ft, the nearby established urban Rosslyn-Ballston corridor competing from a better position, I have a hard time seeing this plan being fully realized. The problem with Tysons is that its just too big to fill up without some very, very aggressive investment. But then again I guess they do have until 2050..."

Tysons has, IIUC, the lowest vacancy rate of any office market in NoVa, and is picking up firms (including Intelsat that chose not to locate in Maryland)It has almost no federal employment, and a surprisingly large number of jobs at non-contractors. And of course a very large part of the growth is residential, not office - the plan envisions a double of employment, but a more than 5 fold increase in residences.

And yes they have till 2050 to reach it - though major changes are already much closer than that - there is much UC and more planned. Given the widespread NIMBYISM in the region (look at the new "radical" DC zoning code that upzones nothing, for example, and the reluctance of ArlCo residents to densify Col Pike, and the agonizing about growth in MoCo) Tysons could become more important as a place for both employment and residents.

by AWalkerInTheCity in Fairfax's answer to neighbors' transit plans: Light rail, streetcars, and BRT on Apr 23, 2014 4:09 pm • linkreport

It is absolutely easier to use than the old regs. If you're looking at a plot of land, you only have to go to one section to see the rules. Previously you had to examine multiple sections (zoning group and overlay).

by MLD in Today's problems were visible decades ago, but zoning has blocked solutions ever since on Apr 23, 2014 3:57 pm • linkreport

@AWalkerInTheCIty

HOV lanes and HOT/Express Lanes are not the same, and neither should be called transit. Dedicated bus (BRT) lanes are obviously the superior option and actually fall under transit.

- I was mostly referring to the Rte 1/Yellow Line extension study

- It would take quite an imagination to truly believe that Tysons will actually look like that, even decades from now. To transform the area you need development, for development (especially the 200-400 ft development they want) you need demand.

With Northern Virginia vacancy rates at 15%+, the defense budget shrinking, GSA reducing sq ft, the nearby established urban Rosslyn-Ballston corridor competing from a better position, I have a hard time seeing this plan being fully realized. The problem with Tysons is that its just too big to fill up without some very, very aggressive investment. But then again I guess they do have until 2050...

by King Terrapin in Fairfax's answer to neighbors' transit plans: Light rail, streetcars, and BRT on Apr 23, 2014 3:46 pm • linkreport

@King Terrapin

If FRA says the bikes have to be tied down on trains faster than 70MPH, then I would question how MNR, LIRR, and NJT get away with not doing so (so Sunny says) when they run faster than that.

If the rule is 70MPH, then there shouldn't be any RRs that are exempt because they all run faster at some point I believe.

by MLD in MARC's chief engineer wants to allow bikes on some weekend trains on Apr 23, 2014 3:39 pm • linkreport

@asffa

True. I wasn't really arguing whether it was safe or not. I was just saying responding to comments comparing MARC's speeds to those of other commuter railroads.

by King Terrapin in MARC's chief engineer wants to allow bikes on some weekend trains on Apr 23, 2014 3:32 pm • linkreport

king terrapin people have luggage and stuff, if it's on the fast moving train with them, it's safe to them and other passengers, if it's thrown at someone outside the train at 125mph, then it's something to worry about. Relativity.

by asffa in MARC's chief engineer wants to allow bikes on some weekend trains on Apr 23, 2014 3:27 pm • linkreport

You mean like how you can simply go to the A-7 section and see all of the relevant data for a building that's currently R-5-A/NO.

And before you had to look at the R-5-A, then the overlay? Especially for a homeowner in, say R-11, you can more quickly tell what is permitted for adding a little ADU that your elderly parent can live in.

Is there something I'm missing?

by Neil Flanagan in Today's problems were visible decades ago, but zoning has blocked solutions ever since on Apr 23, 2014 3:23 pm • linkreport

@William, Or in the alternative, you might let us know what questions did you try to answer, or tests did you run when you determined that the proposed regulations are easier to use than the current regulations?

by OtherMike in Today's problems were visible decades ago, but zoning has blocked solutions ever since on Apr 23, 2014 3:11 pm • linkreport

I see your point but considering most of the connecting service will be shut down for the night I think a few intermediate stops might make sense, but totally agreed they should be at least limited.

by BTA in Breakfast links: More travel on Apr 23, 2014 3:05 pm • linkreport

Either the stats are flawed or they are quoting more poor people moving into Montgomery County.

by tom in Montgomery County added 100,000 residents since 2002, but driving didn't increase on Apr 23, 2014 3:05 pm • linkreport

@ Tom: So maybe one way to increase the supply of moderate priced housing is to reduce some of the burdensome regulations and restrictions that are overly protective of tenants.

by Alf in The DC zoning update has already had triple the public input as the enormous 1958 zoning code. Enough is enough. on Apr 23, 2014 3:00 pm • linkreport

Yes, I confess to disliking skatevandals. I saw the US Park Police cuffing one about two weeks ago,. Certainly put a spring in my step!

by Alf in Downtown DC could have been more like L'Enfant Plaza on Apr 23, 2014 2:58 pm • linkreport

BTA, I'd caution against intermediate stops. That increases trip time, which could conceivably drive down ridership. Much easier logistically to just make stops at all rail stations along the line and call it good.

by JES in Breakfast links: More travel on Apr 23, 2014 2:57 pm • linkreport

I guessed Silver Spring for #5 but wasn't really satisfied with that answer. I always thought both tracks at Greenbelt were accessed from the north side of the station with an at-grade crossover like at Rockville - I've only been to the Lackawanna Street side of Greenbelt once and I guess I didn't notice the internal access point.

My reasoning for #3 was that the really short second line of text on the wall sign had to be a station subtitle, and it must be "Chinatown" since neither of the other underground transfer stations has a subtitle.

by Peter K in How'd you do in week 2 of whichWMATA? on Apr 23, 2014 2:56 pm • linkreport

Interesting stats. Driving will likely continue to decrease or at least won't grow at previous levels relative to population growth.

Aside from Clarksburg, most new residential development in the county has been dense mixed-use/transit oriented, decreasing the need for 1 car for each adult. I'm not just talking about multi-family units either. Most sfh's in MoCo are now being built in planned mixed-use communities within close proximity to transit, and most are townhomes. Crown Farm, King Farm, Shady Grove Watkins Mill Town Center, and Shady Grove Station (EYA) are all large mixed-use, transit accessible communities with mixes of single- multi-family dwellings.

On the transit side, the Purple Line, CCT, BRT lines, and future MARC improvements will only accelerate the decline.

I figured the Colesville-Georgia intersection was the busiest in the county. Everytime I go through it there area always a ton of pedestrians crossing, no matter what time of day/night. The Wayne Ave-Georgia Ave intersection can't be that far behind.

by King Terrapin in Montgomery County added 100,000 residents since 2002, but driving didn't increase on Apr 23, 2014 2:53 pm • linkreport

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