Greater Greater Washington

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One of the first things Wells may need to do is attempt to better coordinate the cities effort on stormwater that is now split between DDOE, DDOT and DC Water. Someone has to be the one to get all the boys and girls to play well together in the same sandbox. . . .and agree with some one who knows.

by luckybiker in Tommy Wells will head DC's environmental agency on Dec 20, 2014 9:12 am • linkreport

Good news on the enviro side with Cheh and her capable staff having oversight of DDOE and DC Water as part of the Transpo and Enviro Committee. McDuffie has been helpful on the black liquor issue and hopefully helpful on this new committee for him.

by luckybiker in Cheh keeps oversight of transportation, but Jack Evans will sit on the WMATA Board on Dec 20, 2014 9:00 am • linkreport

@slowlane, so? Does that change the point Dan made? It sure doesn't sound like it does.

by jag in Maryland's rural economy depends on its urban and suburban areas on Dec 20, 2014 12:53 am • linkreport

I didn't say "vast majority". All I said was:

There are people who live in Rosslyn who don't know what that funny looking building is used for.

by Falls Church in Breakfast links: Done deal on Dec 19, 2014 11:38 pm • linkreport

"Decorations for local and national holidays and events (Cherry Blossom Festival, Independence Day, Thanksgiving, etc.) are fine"

Christmas is a national holiday.

"They're probably the kind of people who are offended by many facts."

Mr. Pot, meet Mr. Kettle.

by The Truth™ in Amsterdam plays Spot the Christmas Streetcar on Dec 19, 2014 10:00 pm • linkreport

I was hoping that Grosso would get judiciary, for the aforementioned support he would bring to the contributory negligence bill. Any insights on how cozy McDuffie may be with the Trial Lawyers Association? It is great he will be focused on protecting the little guy when it comes to police and prosecutorial malfeasance. I hope it translates to the same for victims of traffic negligence.

by fongfong in Cheh keeps oversight of transportation, but Jack Evans will sit on the WMATA Board on Dec 19, 2014 6:49 pm • linkreport

I congratulate GGW for its important work in helping remake DC into a vibrant, thriving people-oriented city. Please remember that the burbs are much less far along in planning, processes, attitudes etc. Maryland's SHA hasn't yet given itself permission to install anything "vertical" like a flexpost or protected bikeway on any state road anywhere. They think crosswalks are a bad idea in general, because that would encourage people to try to cross and thereby be killed. The organization's mission statement seems to be to make all Marylanders scared to even try to cross state roads in their communities. Therefore cars can go faster from elsewhere to elsewhere. Or something. We have a long ways to go.

by Greenbelt in How can we reach out to more communities and people around the region? on Dec 19, 2014 6:43 pm • linkreport

I think Falls Church has set forth an agenda that will work well for TW. Despite his clear interest in progressive transportation and planning issues, I did not find him to be up on all the policy issues that would have made him an effective leader at DDOT. Let's face it, many of those issues are in the weeds wonkish, and I don't think TW would have excelled at getting done what needs to get done.

Not that I am underestimated Bowser's ability to underwhelm me in who she ends up appointing at DDOT and OP. But in this instance, I think she properly gauged TW's strengths and nominated him for a place where having a specific yet ambitious agenda would fit his temperament. As long as he tilts at a reachable windmill, that is.

by fongfong in Tommy Wells will head DC's environmental agency on Dec 19, 2014 6:40 pm • linkreport

One can always find dimwits who believe if it's not on the teevee it must not exist. But I do not think that is representative of the vast majority of Rosslyn residents.

by Rosslyn Resident II in Breakfast links: Done deal on Dec 19, 2014 5:25 pm • linkreport

I know of some parents who bike to work precisely because their time constraints mean they otherwise would find it hard to make time for exercise.

That's me - though I biked to work before I had kids too. When we had our first kid, I had to quit bike commuting because I could no longer afford to get home at 6:30pm, but then when I changed jobs and got much closer to home I was able to start again.

We split the team up and I walk our 4yo to the bus stop and then bike to work after he leaves. My wife drives the twins to daycare, leaves the car there and then takes Metro to work.

But I do think that there is probably some drop-off, on average, in bike commuting among people with little kids in the house. That's just a theory though. And it is probably a small, but measurable, effect.

by David C in New info about who rides a bike in DC will let us make the city even greater for cyclists on Dec 19, 2014 3:59 pm • linkreport

First the datum you are explaining about 80k is not even about biking to work, its about biking and walking combined.

But assuming that it holds true for biking alone, I think that fewer people bike to work in that income range because they tend to live far from work and/or in places where there is little bike infra and roads are less bikeable.

I know of some parents who bike to work precisely because their time constraints mean they otherwise would find it hard to make time for exercise. Depending on where you live and where you work, biking does not take that much longer than driving, and can take the same time or less time than a transit commute. If it doubles as exercise time it can be a time saver.

by Crossingbrooklynferry in New info about who rides a bike in DC will let us make the city even greater for cyclists on Dec 19, 2014 3:48 pm • linkreport

Ward 2 would be an obvious huge beneficiary of Metro expansion in DC. He's not stupid and even if he were his business cronies would give him the message.

by BTA in Cheh keeps oversight of transportation, but Jack Evans will sit on the WMATA Board on Dec 19, 2014 3:40 pm • linkreport

"Bottom line is, you're trying to make a blanket argument like "well of course they don't bike, they're all parents and everyone knows parents can't bike anywhere" with zero data to back that up. Try a little less certainty next time. "

Now we are finally getting somewhere, instead of quibbling over the figures.

I never said ALL -- that was you. I merely provided an interpretation of the data, why so few people making >$80k bike to work -- they are too busy being parents. Still haven't seen anything that suggests otherwise.

I leave household demographics debates to others to prove.

by muskellunge in New info about who rides a bike in DC will let us make the city even greater for cyclists on Dec 19, 2014 3:36 pm • linkreport

Bottom line is, you're trying to make a blanket argument like "well of course they don't bike, they're all parents and everyone knows parents can't bike anywhere" with zero data to back that up. Try a little less certainty next time.

by MLD in New info about who rides a bike in DC will let us make the city even greater for cyclists on Dec 19, 2014 3:28 pm • linkreport

I am a parent, I am over 50 and I bike to work. My child gets to school on her own, which is good, since she is hundreds of miles away.

"Rest assured, most women in their 40s and 50s have a child or two running around the house."

Please present data demonstrating that they do, and that the children are young enough to need to be transported by their parent.

"Just ask any father that pushes all of the child-rearing work to the mother: are you still married?"

Lots of fathers (and I guess some mothers) do a long commute alone. That does not mean they are putting all child rearing work on the other spouse.

Note - most kids over a certain age do not want their parents on top of them all the time. Have you ever dealt with a teenage child?

by Crossingbrooklynferry in New info about who rides a bike in DC will let us make the city even greater for cyclists on Dec 19, 2014 3:27 pm • linkreport

@muskellunge

Uhh, that is not how that math works. That stat is only talking about women who have given birth, not the percent who have children at home right then.

by MLD in New info about who rides a bike in DC will let us make the city even greater for cyclists on Dec 19, 2014 3:17 pm • linkreport

CBF: "would include women who are 49, and had their last child at age 22. They could be grandmothers at that point."

Yet again, LOL!

"84% of women who HAVE had children, how many still have a child at home?"

Rest assured, most women in their 40s and 50s have a child or two running around the house.

"This does not even address the issue of married couples where ONE parent takes the other child to school while the other commutes alone..."

LOL! for the 3rd time. Clearly you are not a parent, running your kids to the soccer matches. Just ask any father that pushes all of the child-rearing work to the mother: are you still married?

But keep up those acrobatics, I need the mirth.

by muskellunge in New info about who rides a bike in DC will let us make the city even greater for cyclists on Dec 19, 2014 3:04 pm • linkreport

I'm not sure if this is the most appropriate place to say this, but I'd love to see some attention devoted to Bellevue. It's surrounded by some large employment centers (NRL, Blue Plains, and DC Village), but doesn't feel like the sort of neighborhood you'd expect near such large employers (it's largely residential rather than having amenities for lunch-goers). I suspect this is largely due to lack of roads connecting Bellevue to these employers, and both 295 and Shepherd Parkway separating Bellevue from NRL and Blue Plains.

I'd love to hear some voices from the area, and learn more about the neighborhood closest to where I work.

by DAR in How can we reach out to more communities and people around the region? on Dec 19, 2014 3:01 pm • linkreport

Note in the US in 2008 the average age of the mother at first birth was 25. Assuming the average age of last birth was 28, that would mean the majority of 45 YO mothers have no child under age 17.

by Crossingbrooklynferry in New info about who rides a bike in DC will let us make the city even greater for cyclists on Dec 19, 2014 3:00 pm • linkreport

That would include women who are 49, and had their last child at age 22. They could be grandmothers at that point.

So - of the 84% of women who HAVE had children, how many still have a child at home? How many of those children are young enough they need to be and are taken to school by their parents (or even have the parent wait at the school bus stop with them)?

This does not even address the issue of married couples where ONE parent takes the other child to school while the other commutes alone, or of non-custodial parents.

by Crossingbrooklynferry in New info about who rides a bike in DC will let us make the city even greater for cyclists on Dec 19, 2014 2:56 pm • linkreport

I'm very pleased to see the new real-time bus arrival signs finally going up! I heard WMATA talk about these a year or so ago, but am glad to see they finally got a few installed. These will help make the bus system easier to navigate, and give some confidence to all riders (not just those with smartphones) that they can know when to expect a bus.

by JS2008 in Breakfast links: Happy new streetcar!? on Dec 19, 2014 2:51 pm • linkreport

@CBF:
"On average, women aged 40 to 50 have had about two children
each, and 16.1 percent are childless."

which means that 83.9% HAVE had children. Close enough for me.

http://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2014/demo/p20-575.pdf

by muskellunge in New info about who rides a bike in DC will let us make the city even greater for cyclists on Dec 19, 2014 2:49 pm • linkreport

@Rosslyn Resident

When I lived in Rosslyn for 10 years, it was a significant amount of time before I knew what that building was. First, it took me some time to learn that it was no longer the Newseum. Second, it wasn't clear to me exactly what an Artisphere was and what sort of things went on inside. Back then, people just referred to it at the dome-shaped building and it was a while before I even heard the name Artisphere. The main thing I knew about it was that it hosted the Bodies exhibit and an odd assortment of live performances.

Also, according to the comments in the WaPo article, there are Rosslyn residents who didn't know what that building was.

Here, I even looked it up for you:

4careers
12/17/2014 8:47 PM EST
I live within a 10 minute walk of the Artisphere. I see it when I walk by, but have no clue what it is or does. I probably am not alone in my ignorance. Guess I can live without it. (3 likes)

by Falls Church in Breakfast links: Done deal on Dec 19, 2014 2:45 pm • linkreport

musk

I think I have presented abundant reasons, but if you consider those reasons to be highfalutin rhetorical acrobatics, I doubt I can convince you.

Can YOU show that most working adults between the age of 40 and 60 have children under 15 at home? Cause I am tired of trying to prove a negative.

by Crossingbrooklynferry in New info about who rides a bike in DC will let us make the city even greater for cyclists on Dec 19, 2014 2:33 pm • linkreport

@OtherMike: wow, you put some work in that.

Minor clarification: I did not ask a question -- I asserted that the reason why those earning >$80 were likely over 40 and too busy with child-related errands to bike commute. And in spite of the highfalutin rhetorical acrobatics, nobody has presented anything to doubt that.

by muskellunge in New info about who rides a bike in DC will let us make the city even greater for cyclists on Dec 19, 2014 2:27 pm • linkreport

Swftkat -- thanks for sharing! People like you are a big part of what makes our community and our blog great! Your ideas are great... keep them coming! We're really hoping to do more next year, but even things like flyering at libraries take some resources. We hope you, our readers, will help out with a gift of whatever you can afford, whether it's $50 or $5 -- every little bit helps! Thank you!

by Aimee Custis in How can we reach out to more communities and people around the region? on Dec 19, 2014 2:26 pm • linkreport

My recommendation for Mr. Wells:

Instead of working on a large range of environmental issues in which DC is only one tiny part of a much bigger global picture, focus time and attention on measurable achievements that improve quality of life for DC residents. For example, a goal to make the Anacostia river safe for swimming by the end of the decade (or some set date) would be incredibly ambitious and audacious but the sort of thing with huge impact on every day life and the kind of issue where DC should unquestionably assume a leadership role.

Working toward a goal like that would likely greatly expand the influence of DDOE on a wide range of policies, assuming he had strong backing from the Mayor on the goal.

While making the Anacostia safe for swimming will be as challenging as sending a person to the moon in the 1960s, I think accomplishing that goal will create a similar amount of pride among DC residents.

by Falls Church in Tommy Wells will head DC's environmental agency on Dec 19, 2014 2:18 pm • linkreport

[This comment has been deleted for violating the comment policy.]

by CV in New info about who rides a bike in DC will let us make the city even greater for cyclists on Dec 19, 2014 2:17 pm • linkreport

pardon, I meant the denominator

by Crossingbrooklynferry in New info about who rides a bike in DC will let us make the city even greater for cyclists on Dec 19, 2014 2:17 pm • linkreport

I used to live in Accokeek, and I even told Dan at one point that I did wish to get more involved several years ago, but life took a different path.

I've been an avid follower of this blog since I was a Sophomore at UMD and I've been amazed at the growth and positive changes that the site as a whole has affected on the greater DC area. It truly has lived up to it's name, Greater Greater. But it's true, our area includes so much more, and everyone deserves a spot. I wanted to help by covering what I knew.

I wanted to see Southern Maryland get as much coverage as NOVA and I almost took that effort on but my job took me elsewhere so now I too live in Northern Virginia now and I feel I wouldn't be able to do justice to the SoMD region so far from it.

There's a lot that goes on down there that affects the region equally as the others. It's both a vast ecosystem with many wonderful natural parks to preserve and many parts growing urban culture. Waldorf is the business center of Southern Maryland, with it's own attempts at smart growth, it definitely deserves some spotlight.

One idea that came to me while part of a book club of sorts was to advertise by dropping their website into the books we read at libraries. It would be innocuous, simple strips that someone could perchance discover while reading too. It wouldn't be 'annoying spam' so much as it follows in the subject material. People would follow up with it online and find out more about what they read. GGW could do something like that, maybe put it into books recommended on this site or related to development and smart growth ideas.

If that seems too invasive, you could always try a flyer approach at the libraries. They're the knowledge centers of communities and always seem like the first stop any civic oriented person would go if they wanted to get further involved in their community. It's what I did when I found out and later joined the Accokeek Development Review District committee. I wanted to enact that positive action and follow through, but unfortunately I'm no longer a part of that circle. But I still like to keep up with what's going on there, and throughout the region.

by Swftkat in How can we reach out to more communities and people around the region? on Dec 19, 2014 2:11 pm • linkreport

Arlington would be wise to run a BRT along Washington Blvd between Clarendon and Crystal/Pentagon/City. It would improve "north-south" transit connections, and provide a one-seat ride from Crystal/Pentagton/City to a dense area (compared to an expensive and time-consuming Blue-Rosslyn-Orange).

by Bold Thinking in Breakfast links: Happy new streetcar!? on Dec 19, 2014 2:11 pm • linkreport

So then undercount in the ACS on bike commuting, by not counting trips to or from transit does not appear to be significant.

By the numbers you quote above it's 2 out of every 32, or 6.25%. To me, that's a significant undercount.

I don’t think that this adjustment would lead to a conclusion that biking is a major factor in commuting.

That depends on how one defines major. But these numbers are for the region. In certain neighborhoods, bike commuting is much higher- as much as 12% as I recall. Still, I'm not sure why it matters if it is major, minor or trivial. I don't think any data* would support the conclusion that bicycle facilities are a major factor in transportation investments.

*Except maybe a measure of complaints by drivers

by David C in New info about who rides a bike in DC will let us make the city even greater for cyclists on Dec 19, 2014 2:10 pm • linkreport

Bear in mind, that the Alexandria BRT line isn't happening in a vaccuum. There are also plans for a Pentagon/Shirlington-Van Dorn BRT via Mark Center and Landmark along Beauregard/Van Dorn Street, and a Landmark-King St BRT along Duke Street.

If you could include a solid Rt. 7 service between King Street Station (difficult understandbly for the section along the hill near the Masonic Temple), you'd have the framework for a real good city-wide BRT network.

by Bold Thinking in Breakfast links: Happy new streetcar!? on Dec 19, 2014 2:09 pm • linkreport

@muskellunge, The American Community Survey, 2013 5-Year Estimates are available on the Census Bureau web-site and provide some answers to your questions. Unfortunately, while walking is a category by itself, biking is combined with motorcycle, taxicab and other means.

The following is the information for means of transportation by age:

For 16-19 years, 31.5% walked, 38.4% took public transit, and 5.08% took bike/cab/motorcycle/other.
For 20-24 years, 21.45% walked, 49.1% took public transit, and 4.83% took bike/cab/motorcycle/other.
For 25-44 years, 12.7% walked, 40.1% took public transit, and 5.54% took bike/cab/motorcycle/other.
For 45-54 years, 7.68% walked, 35.4% took public transit, and 3.74% took bike/cab/motorcycle/other.
For 55-59 years, 7.39% walked, 30.9% took public transit, and 3.40% took bike/cab/motorcycle/other.
For 60-64 years, 7.5% walked, 31.1% took public transit, and 2.08% took bike/cab/motorcycle/other.
For 65 years and over, 8/98% walked, 26.3% took public transit, and 3.06% took bike/cab/motorcycle/other.

Also looking at DC:

For men: 35.7% took transit, 12.6% walked, and 4.56% biked.
For women: 40.9% took transit, 11.8% walked, and 2.55% biked.

You can also download information on means of transportation by income (although the highest category is $75,000 or more), race, type of employer (for-profit, not-for-profit, government, or self-employed), whether the worker lives in an owner-occupied or rented housing unit or other variables, but for most of these, biking will be combined with taxicab, motorcycle and other.

@CBF, JTW is defined elsewhere in the document.

by OtherMike in New info about who rides a bike in DC will let us make the city even greater for cyclists on Dec 19, 2014 2:05 pm • linkreport

Why not terminate the Columbia Pike line at the Pentagon/Pentagon City?

by Bold Thinking in Breakfast links: Happy new streetcar!? on Dec 19, 2014 2:04 pm • linkreport

Good choice by Bowser to have Wells lead this agency. He'll do a good job.

by h st ll in Tommy Wells will head DC's environmental agency on Dec 19, 2014 1:57 pm • linkreport

Good to see the streetcar finally starting. It's going to be a success.

If Mayor-Elect Bowser wants to show some leadership at the grand opening she should pledge to have at least one (ideally two!) extensions of the line starting construction by the 2015. That gives the pencil pushers a year to do all paperwork and there is money in the budget for it. Do it!

by h st ll in Breakfast links: Happy new streetcar!? on Dec 19, 2014 1:55 pm • linkreport

I think Crystal City will be fine with the Metroway bus system. Much/most of the route will be on dedicated lanes, once construction is finished in the spring. The CC streetcar would have been odd because it would have ended at the Alexandria border. (It probably would have been many years before Alexandria would have been ready to take on the streetcar project.)

Of course, CC also has the Metro station (and two other Metro stations nearby), a VRE station, bike lanes and a direct connection to the Mt. Vernon Trail. They are in much better shape with their transportation than Columbia Pike will be in the coming years.

Eventually, the traffic and bus crowding problems will become so great on CP that not even the transit haters will be able to ignore them. Then the streetcar project might get revived. Ten years later?

I still don't think it's realistic for a new MetroRail line to be built on the CP route. WMATA doesn't want L'Enfant Plaza to be another chokepoint like Rosslyn is today. So a CP line would need to follow a new route into DC. That would mean an underground line, and that would mean billions of dollars, above the cost of just the CP section. It's really hard to see any of this happening, at least in the next 30 years.

by Citizen in Breakfast links: Happy new streetcar!? on Dec 19, 2014 1:44 pm • linkreport

Actually, under Gray, OP did not lead Sustainable DC. DDOE has always had a more primary role in the partnership, and it's totally DDOE's responsibility now... and that's a really inaccurate description of how Christophe got fired...

by someone who knows in Tommy Wells will head DC's environmental agency on Dec 19, 2014 1:37 pm • linkreport

Yes, felt like more of the GGW audience in Silver Spring than in Accokeek - not much discussion of 295/210 going past Bolling, I think, where metro access drops off rapidly.

by Ben in How can we reach out to more communities and people around the region? on Dec 19, 2014 1:35 pm • linkreport

I do hope Evans will find a way to restore the tax cut for Streetcar -- use it for Metro -- build new lines and expand (where possible) existing lines to handle more traffic. Once we planned new Metro lines, we can start expanding streetcar. It is my opinion, K Street needs Metro first to be built first then we'll add streetcar on top (OR do what SEPTA did with their subway and streetcar underground along Market Street)

by Dave in Cheh keeps oversight of transportation, but Jack Evans will sit on the WMATA Board on Dec 19, 2014 1:31 pm • linkreport

Isn't Evans famous for having never ridden Metro?

by Carmen Turner in Cheh keeps oversight of transportation, but Jack Evans will sit on the WMATA Board on Dec 19, 2014 1:27 pm • linkreport

the legends in 2-9 and 2-9 are not clear. I am not certain if other and JTW represent what you think they represent.

Note also I am not asserting that biking is currently a major mode as I am not sure what the correct way to define that is, or how it is relevant to any particular policy question. I am merely suggesting that the amount of bike commuting is understated by the journey to work question.

By the way, zero or near zero bike trips to metro in DC is difficult to credit, based on both WMATA data for station access, and visual inspection of bike parking at metro stations.

as for how many ride (or walk) on a given day, the mumerator you appear to be using is total population - which includes children under 5, the institutionalized or housebound elderly, etc.

What is more interesting to me is the direction of change - both walking AND biking are increasing as a percent of all trips in all the inner jurisdictions. Despite the fact that we are still at an early stage in promoting walk and bike friendliness, in concentrating development outside L'enfant DC in WUPs, and a very early stage in building protected bike lanes.

by Crossingbrooklynferry in New info about who rides a bike in DC will let us make the city even greater for cyclists on Dec 19, 2014 1:16 pm • linkreport

"Has anyone even noticed that only 6% of ANY CATEGORY rides a bike?"

FWIW, I have noticed that much less than 6 percent of our major roadways have bike lanes. According to this link, http://www.tlcminnesota.org/pdf/HighwayLaneMiles2004.pdf , the DC area has 5 highway lane-miles per 10,000 population, or 3000 lane-miles of highways for our 6 million DC area residents. We don't have 180 lane-miles of bike lanes next to those highways (6%), but we might be close to 60 lane miles (2%). DC proper has 75 lane miles of bike lanes, but most of them are not on highways.

And that's just the highways. If we ever suddenly developed a biking network that utilized 6 percent of our roadways, this blog would probably go silent because all the writers would either be out riding, stunned into silence, or having multiple orgasms.

by Jonathan Krall in New info about who rides a bike in DC will let us make the city even greater for cyclists on Dec 19, 2014 1:10 pm • linkreport

@BTA: the counterargument is that the developers get to dump the long term infrastructure costs onto existing residents (as the new residents won't generate enough tax revenue to pay for the infrastructure maintenance). There are no easy answers to dealing with sprawl.

by Mike in Breakfast links: Happy new streetcar!? on Dec 19, 2014 1:04 pm • linkreport

CBF: "What we were discussing upthread is why its lower among a certain income level. You asserted, IIRC, that the reason its lower in that income level (NOT low overall) because most people in that income level are older, and most people..."

LOL!

by muskellunge in New info about who rides a bike in DC will let us make the city even greater for cyclists on Dec 19, 2014 1:01 pm • linkreport

In summary

Older people bike/commute about 40% as often as under 25s. Older people are MUCH more likely to live in areas where walking/biking is more difficult, and much more likely to have very long commutes (which make walking and biking more difficult) Ergo, the age difference in walking and biking by age can be explained without regard to family status. And (without presenting data) there are many people over 40 who have no children of an age where they need to be driven to school, hence that is even less likely to be an explanatory factor.

by Crossingbrooklynferry in New info about who rides a bike in DC will let us make the city even greater for cyclists on Dec 19, 2014 1:01 pm • linkreport

@CBF, The chart that you cite is for all weekday bike trips, while the information I listed was from Charts 2-8 and 2-9, not limited to weekdays, but indicating that trips biking to Metro, other transit and car-pools (2%) was significantly smaller than the bike trips for commuting to work and school (43%).

Most commuting trips are probably weekday trips, but the data on trips to and from Metro in Table 2-3 is not limited to commuting, so it isn’t clear how it would be used to adjust the bias in the ACS data, where most people who have a bike/transit commute would report a transit commute. I do agree that we could use more detailed data, but I don’t think that this adjustment would lead to a conclusion that biking is a major factor in commuting.

Also note that Charts 2-12 and 2-13 give the number of weekday walk and bike trips per thousand population.

For DC, there are 919 primary and 328 access weekday walk trips per 1,000 population, but a very small number of loop trips. Assuming that the primary and access trips are round trip, that means fewer than 635 people per thousand walk, on average, each day. (Personally, I find that disappointing.) It is even lower in Arlington, with 573 primary trips and 276 access trips and a small number of loop trips, meaning less than 425 people per 1,000 are walking each day.

For biking, there are 54.9 primary trips, no reported access trips, and 2.2 loop trips per thousand population in DC. This means that, on average, fewer than 30 people per 1,000 ride a bicycle on a weekday. For Arlington, it would be fewer than 19 people per 1,000 riding a bicycle on a weekday, although, the report notes that in Arlington, bicyclists are more likely to use the bike to access Metrorail than in bicyclists in DC.

by OtherMike in New info about who rides a bike in DC will let us make the city even greater for cyclists on Dec 19, 2014 12:59 pm • linkreport

muskellunge

Obviously most people in the greater washington region get to work by car or transit. That is true across age groups, income groups and family types. Because so many people have such long commutes, or live/work in places where walking and biking are very difficult. Indeed that is true across the United States.

What we were discussing upthread is why its lower among a certain income level. You asserted, IIRC, that the reason its lower in that income level (NOT low overall) because most people in that income level are older, and most people who are older do not bike (of course the data here is walk/bike) because of kids. To determine if you are correct we need to compare the biking (or walking/biking) behavior of people older than 45 (or 40, but the paper does not break it like that) to those younger. "Exception" in this context, has to mean by comparison with younger folks. Not as a percent of total commuters. If what you mean is that older bike commuters are exceptional among all older commuters, well thats true - but it is ALSO true, though to a lesser extent, among younger commuters as well.

by Crossingbrooklynferry in New info about who rides a bike in DC will let us make the city even greater for cyclists on Dec 19, 2014 12:58 pm • linkreport

I shudder to think of Anita Bonds at the head of the housing committee. I have to imagine more of her protectionist policies for "old-time" residents and "real Washingtonians" will come forward.

by jj in Cheh keeps oversight of transportation, but Jack Evans will sit on the WMATA Board on Dec 19, 2014 12:54 pm • linkreport

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