Greater Greater Washington

Posts by Matt Johnson

Matt Johnson has lived in the Washington area since 2007. He has a Master's in Planning from the University of Maryland and a BS in Public Policy from Georgia Tech. He lives in Greenbelt. Hes a member of the American Institute of Certified Planners. He is a contract employee of the Montgomery County Department of Transportation. His views are his own and do not represent those of his employer. 

Photography


Think you know Metro? It's whichWMATA week 77

After a winter hiatus, it's (finally!) time for the seventy-seventh installment of our weekly "whichWMATA" series! Below are photos of five stations in the Washington Metro system. Can you identify each from its picture?


Image 1


Image 2


Image 3


Image 4


Image 5

We'll hide the comments so the early birds don't spoil the fun. Please have your answers in by noon on Thursday.

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

Did you enjoy this article? Greater Greater Washington is running a reader drive to raise funds so we can keep editing and publishing great articles every day. Please help us be sustainable by making a monthly, yearly, or one-time contribution today!

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Transit


The Northeast Corridor carries more rail passengers than anywhere else in the country. What could it look like in 2040?

The Federal Railroad Administration recently unveiled their draft plans to improve rail travel across the northeast, from Washington to Boston. The plan will help set the stage for a potential transformation of train service in the mega region.


Acela at New Carrollton. Photo by the author.

Today, Washington, Philadelphia, New York, and Boston are linked by a busy rail line known as the Northeast Corridor (NEC). The 457-mile line is the busiest passenger railway in the nation, carrying over 750,000 passengers each day on more than 2,200 trains.

But the corridor is desperately in need of investment just to bring it to a state of good repair. Several chokepoints mean that the line is currently operating near capacity, which means it can't support expected growth in population, employment, or intercity travel.

The plan is what's known as a "Tier 1 EIS." That means that it is an environmental analysis that looks at the broader issues. Detailed study of specific elements will require "Tier 2" EIS studies and those will be conducted as projects work their way through the planning process.

The plan sets out three options

The analysis looks at three main scenarios for investment in the Northeast Corridor. Each of the options has the same core objectives: making rail more reliable, dependable, durable and environmentally sustainable, increasing both the number of passengers it can carry and the places it goes, and contributing to economic growth. But some of the plans are more ambitious than others.

Alternative 1 would make fixes to existing rail and other infrastructure, but would otherwise leave things alone. Its investments in the corridor would mainly involve fixing chokepoints, with limited areas of additional track. It allows for an increase in service which would keep pace with employment and population growth.


Alternative 1. All maps from NEC Future.

The second alternative would build more rail, allowing an expansion of capacity faster than population or employment growth. Work will involve getting rid of chokepoints, widening most of the corridor to four tracks, and building a few new segments outside the current alignment.


Alternative 2.

The third option would build a lot more rail, the goal being to "transform" rail into the dominant mode in the northeast. In addition to upgrading the existing corridor with new track and chokepoint relief, this alternative adds a new independent high-speed line parallel to the corridor. Between Washington and New York, it's very close to the existing route. However, between New York and Boston, there are three possible routings, including one via Long Island and two through inland Connecticut.


Alternative 3.

There's also a "no action" alternative, which assumes the corridor won't be upgraded, in which case, capacity and travel times won't be changed by 2040.

Each option has different ridership projections and capacity increases...

More people will certainly ride on the corridor by 2040, and taking no action would mean doing little to accommodate that growth. Even now, tunnels under the Hudson River are completely full during rush hour; the current 24 trains per hour in each direction is the maximum.

Alternative 1 would allow for a 75% increase over the no action alternative for inter-city trips and a 13% increase for commuter trains, to 33.7 million and 474.5 million trips, respectively. This scenario would add two new tunnels under the Hudson and allow for 37 trains per hour.

Alternative 2, which expands the role of rail, would allow for a 92% increase in inter-city and an 18% increase in commuter trips on the corridor, to 37.1 million and 495.4 million, respectively. The second alternative also adds two new Hudson tunnels, which, in conjunction with other projects, would allow for up to 52 trains per hour in each direction.

The third alternative, which transforms the role of rail, more than doubles intercity ridership to 39 million trips and increases commuter rail ridership to 545.5 million, a 30% increase. This option adds four tunnels under the Hudson, for a total of six. It would allow up to 70 trains per hour to cross under the river.

...as well as a different effect on travel time

Each of the alternatives would reduce travel time over the no action option. Without the proposed improvements, an express could cover the distance between Washington and New York in 2:47. It would be 6:33 to Boston.

Alternative 1 would reduce the Washington to New York express time to 2:43 and Washington to Boston to 5:45. Alternative 2 does even better, reducing the New York trip to 2:26 and the Boston trip to 5:07. But Alternative 3 is the fastest, with a completely new high-speed corridor reducing travel time to New York to 1:48 and to Boston in 3:57.

For corridor trains (roughly equivalent to today's Northeast Regional), there are also time savings. The no action alternative would have Washington to New York trips in 3:23 and Washington to Boston in 8:02.

Alternative 1 would allow corridor trains to cover the distance to New York and Boston in 3:08 and 6:57, respectively. Under the second alternative, DC to New York would come in at 3:01 and to Boston in 6:22. The major investment alternative would bring times down to 2:51 to New York and 5:47 to Boston.

Details for each alternative
Even the no action alternative costs $19.9 billion. That's because it includes the costs of funded projects, funded and unfunded mandates, and over $10 billion in projects that are necessary to keep the corridor operating but which are currently unfunded.

Alternative 1
Alternative 1 is the cheapest alternative, with an estimated price tag of $64-66 billion.

There are a few notable projects included in this option. Locally, it calls for rebuilding New Carrollton station so that it has four tracks, each with access to a platform. It also includes a project to widen the corridor to four tracks from Odenton to Halethorpe, along with a new BWI station with four tracks.


Alternative 1 in Baltimore.

Importantly, the plans call for replacing the B&P Tunnels in Baltimore, which are near the end of their useful life. The plan also includes two new tunnels under the Hudson, bringing the total to four.

One realigned section of track is part of this alternative, a 50-mile bypass of the shore line in Connecticut and Rhode Island, between Old Saybrook and Kenyon. Slower trains would continue to use the curvy line, but faster trains would run on the new line, which would avoid several drawbridges.

Alternative 2
Alternative 2 comes in at around $131-136 billion.

Like the first alternative, it includes four tracks at New Carrollton and between Odenton and Halethorpe, along with a new BWI station. It also calls for a third track between Washington and New Carrollton.

The B&P Tunnel replacement in Baltimore and two new Hudson tunnels are included in this option as well. But the plan also adds two new tunnels under the East River (for a total of six), which was not part of the first alternative.


Alternative 2 in northeastern Maryland.

Several new segments are also part of this project, bypassing slower sections of the line with straighter bypasses. A new line between Aberdeen, Maryland and Newark, Delaware, a bypass of Wilmington, and a straightened section in north Philadelphia allow for faster trains. The plan also includes running a more direct route into Philadelphia 30th Street station via a station at Philadelphia Airport.

Alternative 3
Alterative 3 is the most expensive, since it's building two railway corridors. The estimate for that option ranges from $267 to $308 billion, depending on which route is chosen.

This option upgrades the existing corridor significantly, including many of the projects from the other alternatives. Under this plan, the existing corridor would be widened to four tracks for most of its length south of New York. This aspect would include four platform tracks at New Carrollton and BWI Airport.

Like the other proposals, this alternative replaces the B&P Tunnels. It also adds two new tubes under the Hudson for the corridor and two more Hudson Tunnels (for a total of six) for the high-speed line. The East River would also get two new tunnels (for a total of six).

The existing corridor wouldn't get very many straightenings under this plan, since the second spine would be far more direct and faster. The high-speed line would include tunnels under downtown Baltimore and Philadelphia, with center city stations there.


Alternative 3 in Baltimore.

North of New York, the second spine would be on a completely new route. There are a couple of options for the new routing.


Options for a new high-speed routing north of New York.

Between New York and Hartford, the new line could either run east across Long Island to Ronkonkoma and turn north to cross the existing line at New Haven before continuing to Hartford or it could turn north via White Plains and Danbury before reaching Hartford.

From Hartford to Boston, the line could either run east to Providence and then along the existing line to Boston or northeast to Worcester and then east to Boston.

These new lines are expensive, but have the possibility of opening up new markets, especially on Long Island.

Conclusion
Each of the options outlined in the FRA study is expensive. But an upgrade to the corridor is necessary. The current infrastructure is aging and overburdened. Chokepoints like the Hudson tunnels severely constrain capacity, and will prevent Amtrak and commuter agencies from meeting growing demand.

And the cost of doing nothing is not zero. Without this investment, the northeastern mega region won't be able to move efficiently or grow. And that will have dramatic economic consequences.

But not investing in rail will mean that we'll have to spend even more enlarging highways and airports. And even with that, we'll still have to spend money just keeping the existing Northeast Corridor infrastructure in a state of good repair.

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Photography


Here are the answers to whichWMATA week 76

On Tuesday, we posted our seventy-sixth photo challenge to see how well you knew Metro. I took photos of five Metro stations. Here are the answers. How well did you do?

This week, we got 23 guesses. Six got all five. Great work, Gregory Koch, Jay K, Peter K, We Will Crush Peter K, JamesDCane, and AlexC!


Image 1: Glenmont

The first image shows Glenmont. This one was pretty straight-forward. There aren't very many "Arch II" stations, which have a six coffer cross-section, and the only one on the Red Line is Glenmont.

Nineteen got this one right.


Image 2: Shaw

The next image was taken at Shaw's southern entrance. The main clue here is the Shaw Library and the lighted art out front. The traffic signals in the background are also clearly DC-style signals, so that may have helped you figure it out.

Seventeen knew this one.


Image 3: Bethesda

The third image shows an entrance pylon at Bethesda station. The sign is clearly non-standard, especially the font, which is not Helvetica. This entrance is on the southeast corner of East-West Highway and Wisconsin Avenue and access to the station is via the office building lobby.

Other than the sign, the biggest clue here is the median, which separates one-way traffic. East-West Highway (Route 410) is a part of a couplet (with Montgomery Avenue) in downtown Bethesda. The five westbound lanes are separated by a median, with the left two lanes turning left onto Wisconsin. This sort of street arrangement is fairly rare.

Fifteen guessed correctly.


Image 4: National Airport

I can almost guarantee that most of you have used this station—National Airport—without ever setting eyes upon this entrance. The station actually has three entrances: The escalator-only entrances at the north and south ends of the platform are staffed and popular. But in between those, there's a third mezzanine for the elevator-only entrance.

The platform elevators are in the center of the platform, and don't connect directly to either of the main entrances. Instead, they lead to this small, unstaffed mezzanine with just two faregates and two farecard machines. A covered walkway beneath the platform leads to the main entances and the airport bridges at either end.

As several of you noted, the framing is evocative of the design of the new airport terminal. Another clue is the airport upper level roadway, just visible in the distance. You can also see a column supporting the station at center-right, indicating that this is an elevated station.

Eleven got the right answer.


Image 5: Stadium/Armory

The final image shows a sign outside Stadium/Armory. Like most WMATA stations, only one entrance has an elevator. In this case, that's the southern entrance. The northern entrance is closest to RFK Stadium and the DC Armory, though, so many users may be unfamiliar with the design. This sign points the way, two blocks farther south to the elevator.

The sign is very reflective of the huge banner in the station that says "Stadium this way," and I suspect they were designed at the same time. That was a clue. As is the somewhat distinctive fence at left.

Sixteen came to the correct conclusion.

Thanks for playing!

We're going on hiatus for a few weeks. WhichWMATA will return in 2016. So use the holidays to study up on the Metro system to prepare for more quizzes in the new year.

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

Did you enjoy this article? Greater Greater Washington is running a reader drive to raise funds so we can keep editing and publishing great articles every day. Please help us be sustainable by making a monthly, yearly, or one-time contribution today!

Support us: Monthly   Yearly   One time
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Greatest supporter—$250
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Supporter—$20
Or pick your own amount: $
Want to contribute by mail or another way? Instructions are here.
Contributions to Greater Greater Washington are not tax deductible.

Photography


Think you know Metro? It's whichWMATA week 76

It's time for the seventy-sixth installment of our weekly "whichWMATA" series! Below are photos of five stations in the Washington Metro system. Can you identify each from its picture?


Image 1


Image 2


Image 3


Image 4


Image 5

We'll hide the comments so the early birds don't spoil the fun. Please have your answers in by noon on Thursday.

UPDATE: The answers are here.

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

Did you enjoy this article? Greater Greater Washington is running a reader drive to raise funds so we can keep editing and publishing great articles every day. Please help us be sustainable by making a monthly, yearly, or one-time contribution today!

Support us: Monthly   Yearly   One time
Greatest supporter—$250/year
Greater supporter—$100/year
Great supporter—$50/year
Or pick your own amount: $/year
Greatest supporter—$250
Greater supporter—$100
Great supporter—$50
Supporter—$20
Or pick your own amount: $
Want to contribute by mail or another way? Instructions are here.
Contributions to Greater Greater Washington are not tax deductible.

Photography


Here are the answers to whichWMATA week 75

On Tuesday, we posted our seventy-fifth photo challenge to see how well you knew Metro. I took photos of five Metro stations. Here are the answers. How well did you do?

This week we got 33 guesses. Four got all five. Great work, AlexC, Peter K, Stephen C, and Justin....!


Image 1: Tysons Corner

The first image shows the southern entrance to Tysons Corner station. The structural elements of the pedestrian bridge are common to the new Silver Line stations, so that should have helped you narrow this down. Clues pointing to Tysons Corner station specifically are the VITA tower (under construction at left) and the fact that there's a spur pedestrian bridge leading away from the entry pavilion.

That bridge leads to Tysons Corner Center. Only Tysons Corner station has a spur like that. The other stations simply have a single bridge leading to an entry pavilion, except for Wiehle's northern entrance, where the bridge lands in a plaza.

Twenty-nine got this one right.


Image 2: Cheverly

The second image shows a unique perspective of Cheverly station. This station has side platforms, which itself limits the number of possibilities. It also has the split Gull I canopy, which is present only at Cheverly and Eisenhower Avenue. But it's impossible to get a view like this at Eisenhower, since the mezzanine is below the tracks.

The mezzanine at Cheverly is above the tracks and it feels very fortress-like. The only openings in the walls are a narrow horizontal slit, which is why the viewpoint in this photo is narrow.

Twenty-six guessed correctly.


Image 3: Southern Avenue

The third image shows a view of the entry bridge to Southern Avenue station. There were a couple of clues here, but the primary clue is the bridge at left. It connects the upper level of the parking garage to the station by crossing over the bus loop.

Suitland has a very similar bridge, but there are some distinct differences. The primary difference is that Suitland's bridge is almost entirely glass on the second level. There's much less framing. Additionally, this viewpoint (to the left of the bridge) is not possible so close to the station at Suitland because the bridge is longer. Finally, Suitland has a very shallow peaked skylight, unlike Southern Avenue.

Sixteen figured it out.


Image 4: New Carrollton

The fourth image shows the view from a train arriving at New Carrollton station. The Metro platform is not pictured. Instead, this is a picture showing the Amtrak/MARC platform to the west of the Metro tracks.

The main clue here is that the commuter rail platform is an island platform (note the yellow strip on both sides and the lack of a second platform in the foreground). The perspective, with a non-platform track in the foreground, also should help to prove this is New Carrollton. Finally, the building in the background (the New Carrollton Federal Building) should have helped you out.

Eighteen got the right answer.


Image 5: Forest Glen

The final image was certainly the hardest, but over a third of you figured it out. It shows the tunnel leading from the parking lot/bus loop at Forest Glen to the station mezzanine. There wasn't a lot to go on, but there were a few clues.

First, you can see the station manager's booth and fare gates in the distance, but there's also a lot of natural light, which eliminates subway stations (which are much dimmer). The natural light here is possible because Forest Glen's mezzanine sits in a squat building just below ground level on the southwest corner of Georgia Avenue and Forest Glen Road.

The angle of the doorway at the end of the tunnel also indicates that it lines up with the mezzanine at an odd angle. That's because the tunnel connects the mezzanine to the bus loop, which is on the opposite side of Forest Glen Road and half a block west. Greenbelt has a similar angled tunnel, but the station manager's booth there isn't in line with the tunnel.

Finally, the opening to the right leads to the unique staircase that leads to the corner of Coleridge Drive and Forest Glen Road. That staircase has an open grating above it, so there's plenty of natural light spilling through the doorway. We featured that stairway in week 47.

Thirteen came to the correct conclusion.

Next week, we'll have five more photos for you to identify. Thanks for playing!

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

Did you enjoy this article? Greater Greater Washington is running a reader drive to raise funds so we can keep editing and publishing great articles every day. Please help us be sustainable by making a monthly, yearly, or one-time contribution today!

Support us: Monthly   Yearly   One time
Greatest supporter—$250/year
Greater supporter—$100/year
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Or pick your own amount: $/year
Greatest supporter—$250
Greater supporter—$100
Great supporter—$50
Supporter—$20
Or pick your own amount: $
Want to contribute by mail or another way? Instructions are here.
Contributions to Greater Greater Washington are not tax deductible.

Photography


Think you know Metro? It's whichWMATA week 75

It's time for the seventy-fifth installment of our weekly "whichWMATA" series! Below are photos of five stations in the Washington Metro system. Can you identify each from its picture?


Image 1


Image 2


Image 3


Image 4


Image 5

We'll hide the comments so the early birds don't spoil the fun. Please have your answers in by noon on Thursday.

UPDATE: The answers are here.

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

Did you enjoy this article? Greater Greater Washington is running a reader drive to raise funds so we can keep editing and publishing great articles every day. Please help us be sustainable by making a monthly, yearly, or one-time contribution today!

Support us: Monthly   Yearly   One time
Greatest supporter—$250/year
Greater supporter—$100/year
Great supporter—$50/year
Or pick your own amount: $/year
Greatest supporter—$250
Greater supporter—$100
Great supporter—$50
Supporter—$20
Or pick your own amount: $
Want to contribute by mail or another way? Instructions are here.
Contributions to Greater Greater Washington are not tax deductible.

Photography


Here are the answers to whichWMATA week 74

On Tuesday, we posted our seventy-fourth photo challenge to see how well you knew Metro. I took photos of five Metro stations. Here are the answers. How well did you do?

This week, we got 48 guesses. Thirteen got all five correct. Great work, Harry W, Andy L, Peter K, JessMan, Steven Yates, AlexC, Solomon, Roger Bowles, JamesDCane, AK, AroundtheHorn, FN, and Mr Johnson!


Image 1: Gallery Place

This week, each of the pictures was of something reflected in the polished surface of a Metro pylon.

The first image shows artwork (and the station manager's booth) at the 7th and H entrance to Gallery Place. The artwork, known as "Glory of the Chinese Descendants," has been featured several times in the series, including in week 4. Recognizing that was the key to solving the first image, as 46 of you did.


Image 2: Van Ness

The second image shows the reflection of the vault wall at Van Ness. You can see some of the lettering on the pylon, specifically the double "s" in Van Ness. Most of you surmised that it could only be one of three stations: Congress Heights, Rosslyn, or Van Ness.

Rosslyn is easily discounted because the vault there is "waffle" rather than "arch." But the crucial clue was figuring out that this was an "Arch I" station (like Van Ness) rather than "Arch II" (like Congress Heights). Arch I stations have just two coffers on either side of the midpoint of the vault, so they're very tall. Additionally, Arch I stations have a higher gap between the base of the vault and the first coffer.

Had this been Congress Heights, you likely would be able to see the seam between the first and second coffers, and the base of the first coffer would be closer to the base lighting. There's also electrical conduit running along the base of the vault at Congress Heights which isn't present here.

Thirty-eight guessed Van Ness.


Image 3: Prince George's Plaza

The third image shows the reflected tunnel portals at the north end of Prince George's Plaza station. The station is fairly distinctive, being in a broad open cut, with the train going into tunnels on either end. The side platforms should have helped you narrow this considerably, since most stations have center platforms. But the real clue is the proximity of the tunnel portals, directly adjacent to the platform end.

Twenty-nine got it right.


Image 4: College Park

The fourth image shows College Park station. You can just make out the bottom of a "k" on the pylon, which is probably why some of you guessed Braddock Road. But a closer inspection reveals that the k is preceded by a letter with a straight stem (an "r" in this case).

The parking garage is the main clue here. At College Park, it's located right next to the northbound track, with the elevator tower to the south. It may look odd in this image because everything is mirrored. This picture was taken from the south end of the platform facing away from the garage.
Thirty-one guessed correctly.


Image 5: Dunn Loring

The final image shows a view of the east end of Dunn Loring. As Peter K noted in the comments, there were a couple of ways to figure this one out. First, you can see some text on the pylon. The hyphen is very obvious. The character at the top is a lower case "g." That alone should have led you to Dunn Loring. But if it did not, there were other clues.

The clearest is the freeway gantry sign in the reflection. Specifically, it's this three panel gantry. As Peter noted, you can see that the left-most sign (the one over the right lanes, remember this is a reflection) has a yellow exit-only strip. And the panel closest to the hyphen has a left side exit tab, which significantly narrows down the options. In this case, it's a left exit for the I-495 express lanes.

Finally, if you look very closely, you can just make out a freeway ramp crossing over the end of the station. That's the ramp from I-495 Express northbound to I-66 westbound. Dunn Loring is the only station with a freeway ramp crossing over it.

Thirty came to the correct conclusion.

Next week, we'll have five more photos for you to identify. Thanks for playing!

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

Did you enjoy this article? Greater Greater Washington is running a reader drive to raise funds so we can keep editing and publishing great articles every day. Please help us be sustainable by making a monthly, yearly, or one-time contribution today!

Support us: Monthly   Yearly   One time
Greatest supporter—$250/year
Greater supporter—$100/year
Great supporter—$50/year
Or pick your own amount: $/year
Greatest supporter—$250
Greater supporter—$100
Great supporter—$50
Supporter—$20
Or pick your own amount: $
Want to contribute by mail or another way? Instructions are here.
Contributions to Greater Greater Washington are not tax deductible.

Photography


Think you know Metro? It's whichWMATA week 74

It's time for the seventy-fourth installment of our weekly "whichWMATA" series! Below are photos of 5 stations in the Washington Metro system. Can you identify each from its picture?


Image 1


Image 2


Image 3


Image 4


Image 5

We'll hide the comments so the early birds don't spoil the fun. Please have your answers in by noon on Thursday.

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

Did you enjoy this article? Greater Greater Washington is running a reader drive to raise funds so we can keep editing and publishing great articles every day. Please help us be sustainable by making a monthly, yearly, or one-time contribution today!

Support us: Monthly   Yearly   One time
Greatest supporter—$250/year
Greater supporter—$100/year
Great supporter—$50/year
Or pick your own amount: $/year
Greatest supporter—$250
Greater supporter—$100
Great supporter—$50
Supporter—$20
Or pick your own amount: $
Want to contribute by mail or another way? Instructions are here.
Contributions to Greater Greater Washington are not tax deductible.

Meta


Can you help us monitor comments?

We think the Greater Greater Washington comment discussions and the community of people who participate are a very special and valuable component of this site and our work. We need a few volunteers to help monitor the comments and keep them great.


Photo by egil viesturson on Flickr.

We want a comment section that, as much as possible, people feel comfortable participating in, and which readers can find educational to read. That means keeping a high proportion of comments that add useful information or thoughtful perspectives, and minimizing those that attack or snipe at others.

We've developed over time a comment policy to try to govern this. Matt Johnson has been moderating comments for years, but he and we need some help going forward.

What we need

Therefore, we're looking for some comment monitors who can keep watch on the comments throughout the day and quickly report any comments that cross the line of our policy. In the future, we're also hoping some of the monitors can actually delete or modify comments, but we'll start by having Matt and David continue taking the final action with input from our new comment monitors.

You could be a prolific commenter or just an avid lurker. The number of comments you've written doesn't matter, but you do need to have a strong commitment to keeping our comment threads focused on issues and not personalities or minutiae of what someone else said in an earlier comment.

You don't have to be able to look at comments every minute, but do need to be able to look at them (either on a computer or mobile device) frequently throughout weekdays.

If you can help us out, please drop us a note at info@ggwash.org with "Comment monitor" in the subject line. Thank you so much!

Did you enjoy this article? Greater Greater Washington is running a reader drive to raise funds so we can keep editing and publishing great articles every day. Please help us be sustainable by making a monthly, yearly, or one-time contribution today!

Support us: Monthly   Yearly   One time
Greatest supporter—$250/year
Greater supporter—$100/year
Great supporter—$50/year
Or pick your own amount: $/year
Greatest supporter—$250
Greater supporter—$100
Great supporter—$50
Supporter—$20
Or pick your own amount: $
Want to contribute by mail or another way? Instructions are here.
Contributions to Greater Greater Washington are not tax deductible.

Other


Here are the answers to whichWMATA week 73

On Tuesday, we posted our seventy-third photo challenge to see how well you knew Metro. I took photos of five Metro stations. Here are the answers. How well did you do?

This week we got 35 guesses. Fifteen people got all five. great work!


Image 1: Arlington Cemetery

The first image shows the view down into the mezzanine from the Franconia platform at Arlington Cemetery. This is one of Metro's few unique stations, so for some of you, the answer probably jumped right off the page.

At Arlington Cemetery, there's a tunnel under the tracks, with a solitary escalator on either side for each platform. Another clue is the fact that the station has side platforms and a unique roof (the under side of Memorial Avenue).

All 35 knew this one.


Image 2: Farragut North

The second image shows an art installation called "Pulse" at Farragut North. It's located in the southern entrance escalator shaft, at the northeast corner of Connecticut and K. The artwork is relatively new, installed in early 2013.

Twenty got this one right.


Image 3: Clarendon

The third image shows the plaza above Clarendon station. We featured this plaza in week 27. The plaza is distinctive, and the you may have recognized it or the covered bike parking on either side.

Twenty-four figured it out.


Image 4: Greenbelt

The fourth image, Greenbelt, required you to use more context clues. You can just see the canopy at far right, and should have been able to tell it was a "general peak" roof. You can also tell that it is a station adjacent to railroad tracks. Between those two factors, you could narrow it down to three stations: College Park, Greenbelt, and Rockville.

Because the commuter rail platform at Rockville extends south past the Metro platform it would be visible in this picture if it was Rockville. The station parking lot would also be visible. College Park has a concrete wall between the Metro tracks and the CSX tracks, which is not present here.

Greenbelt fits though. The other clue is the pair of switch motors (the silver colored objects) stradling the CSX tracks. They control the platform sidings which allow trains to access the Greenbelt MARC platforms.

Twenty-seven guessed correctly.


Image 5: Prince George's Plaza

The final image shows a sign at Prince George's Plaza. Metro's Lost and Found Office is located in an office building near the station, and this sign directs riders to the address. You can see part of the message "Lost and Found: 6505 Belcrest Road."

If you were able to figure out that the sign referred to "lost and found," you could have googled to figure out where Metro's lost and found office was, and guessed the sign would be at nearby Prince George's Plaza.

Twenty-eight came to the correct conclusion.

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

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