Greater Greater Washington

Posts by Matt Johnson

Matt Johnson has lived in the Washington area since 2007. He has a Master's in Planning from the University of Maryland and a BS in Public Policy from Georgia Tech. He lives in Greenbelt. He’s a member of the American Institute of Certified Planners. He is a contract employee of the Montgomery County Department of Transportation. His views are his own and do not represent those of his employer. 

Photography


Here are the answers to whichWMATA week 82

On Tuesday, we posted our eighty-second photo challenge to see how well you knew Metro. I took photos of five Metro stations. Here are the answers. How well did you do?

This week, we got 27 guesses. Nine got all five. Great work Peter K, JamesDCane, Justin..., Chris H, AlexC, Dillon the Pickle, FN, Solomon, and Stephen C!


Image 1: Tysons Corner

The first image is the view of Tysons Corner station from the plaza adjacent to the Vita building. Given the unique Silver Line architecture, you should have been able to easily narrow this down to the two "Gambrel" style stations. But Tysons Corner station isn't in a median, like Greensboro is, so this can't be Greensboro. All but one of you got this one right. Great work.


Image 2: Fort Totten

The second picture shows the top of a memorial plaque in the mezzanine at Fort Totten. The "Y OF" that is visible is part of the phrase, "in memory of," and is a memorial to the nine people killed in the 2009 Metro crash just north of the station.

Additionally, the windows and angles here are indicative of the mezzanine shape of Fort Totten. From this vantage point, we're looking toward the two escalators connecting the mezzanine to the Green/Yellow platform.

Twenty knew the correct answer.


Image 3: Van Dorn Street

The third image shouldn't have been too hard if you know the architecture of the system. The presence of three Blue Line trains on the PIDS tells you that this is almost certainly a Blue-only station, of which there are only three in the system. This picture was taken on a Saturday, but even though you didn't know that, there are times (weekends and off-peak), when Van Dorn and Franconia are not served by the Yellow Line.

Two of the three Blue-only stations can be easily eliminated. Arlington Cemetery is depressed in an open cut (so the trees wouldn't be visible) and doesn't have a canopy at all. Instead, it's only covered where Memorial Avenue crosses it. Week 8 gives you a sense of what that looks like. Franconia/Springfield, on the other hand has a very different canopy and the PIDS signs have a different format at terminal stations (BLUE LINE | LARGO CENTER | LEAVING 3 MINS).

But even if there had been only one Blue Line train on the board, you still could have solved this. That's because the canopy visible here is a "Gull I" design. And the only Gull I station served by the Blue Line is Van Dorn Street.

Twenty-five figured it out.


Image 4: Wheaton

The fourth image was a little trickier, and required you to take a second look to figure out that this was Wheaton. Many of you went with your first instinct, but closer inspection should have revealed this to be a twin-tube station. One clue is the presence of "can" lights hanging from the vault, which aren't present at the higher single-vault stations.

The perspective here is clearly looking through the doors of an elevator. Some downtown stations do have side platforms with the elevator in an alcove off to the side like this. But all of those stations have the "waffle" design, not the taller coffer "arch"-style. None of the "Arch I" or "Arch II" stations have side platforms. And that means this has to be one of the twin-tube stations.

It can't be Forest Glen because, as several of you noted, the elevators there all land in a common lobby and are farther from the tracks. At Wheaton, however, the solitary elevator lands not in the escalator lobby, but in an alcove at the far northern end of the Shady Grove platform.

Ten came to the correct conclusion.


Image 5: Capitol Heights

The final image was even more challenging, but there was enough information to figure out that it's Capitol Heights.

Like with image 3 above, you can tell that this station is served only by the Blue and Silver Lines (since the Orange Line isn't listed on the sign). There are only two underground stations that are served by the Blue and Silver, so even without additional information, you could have made a guess with a 50/50 probability of getting the right answer. Some of you did that and got lucky.

But there was a way to be 100% certain, and it involves knowing that while Benning Road and Capitol Heights are nearly identical, they're mirror images of each other. In week 56 we also ran a set with a similar signage clue and noted in the answers post the difference between the two stations.

At both stations, the single mezzanine is at the far end of the platform. At Benning Road, the mezzanine is at the east end. At Capitol Heights, it's at the west end. That means that when you descend to the platform at Capitol Heights, you're facing east. And if you're facing east, trains going eastbound to Largo are on your right, and trains going west toward downtown are on your left.

One final note: The reason you know this sign is at the bottom of the escalator when you arrive is because this is a fairly typical application of WMATA's signing in this case, since this is a decision point and because anywhere else on the platform, the column would also include a strip map of farther stations reached on the appropriate track.

Nineteen came to the correct conclusion.

Thanks for playing! We'll be back in two weeks with our next quiz.

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

Photography


Think you know Metro? It's whichWMATA week 82

It's time for the eighty-second installment of our weekly "whichWMATA" series! Below are photos of five stations in the Washington Metro system. Can you identify each from its picture?


Image 1


Image 2


Image 3


Image 4


Image 5

We'll hide the comments so the early birds don't spoil the fun. Please have your answers in by noon on Thursday.

UPDATE: The answers are here.

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

Photography


Here are the answers to whichWMATA week 81

On Tuesday, we posted our eighty-first photo challenge to see how well you knew Metro. I took photos of five Metro stations. Here are the answers. How well did you do?

This week, we got 50 guesses. Sixteen got all five. Great work JamesDCane, AlexC, Peter K, Eric P, Stephen C, ajw4, Solomon, Sand Box John, FN, Chris H, Andy L, dpod, DavidDuck, merarch, Travis Maiers, and We Will Crush Peter K!


Image 1: Medical Center

The first image shows a platform pylon at Medical Center. There are five stations in the system with "center" in their name: Federal Center SW, Largo Town Center, Medical Center, Metro Center, and Mount Vernon Square/Convention Center.

However, Metro Center and Federal Center have waffle-style vaults, Largo is outdoors, and the "Center" in Mount Vernon Square wraps onto a second line of text on the pylon. That leaves Medical Center. Additionally, you can see that the vault here has only four coffers, making it Arch I, present only on the Red Line's Shady Grove end.

Forty-four knew this one.


Image 2: Branch Avenue

The second image shows the southern terminal of the Green Line, Branch Avenue. There are only four high peak stations, which narrows the field considerably. The next train indicator is a hint that this station is a terminal station. It's true that these signs are also present at some stations that used to be terminals, however none of the high peak stations are former terminals.

That leaves the two current terminals, Franconia/Springfield and Branch Avenue. However, Franconia is not in an open cut with retaining walls on either side. Additonally, the trapezoidal caps on the columns supporting the canopy are only present at Branch Avenue. That attribute was featured in week 66.

Forty-three got the right answer.


Image 3: Cheverly

The third image shows a view looking northwest from the Vienna platform at Cheverly. This image was harder than I anticipated, given the clues present.

The presence of single-level Amtrak equipment narrows this down to one of the stations along the Orange Line between Cheverly and New Carrollton, the Blue Line between Braddock Road and Franconia, and NoMa. The only Amtrak service along the Red Line is the Capitol Limited, which uses double-decker equipment.

But another clue is that the station has side platforms, which you can tell from the perspective. Finally, it's an outdoor side-platform station with a mezzanine above the tracks. Only Cheverly fits the bill.

Only 30 got the correct result.


Image 4: Vienna

The fourth image shows a view from the platform escalator into the mezzanine at Vienna. The main clue is the sign overhead, which directs passengers to the north and south side access roads, with buses and parking on both sides, a situation only present at Vienna and Wiehle Avenue.

The skylights are indicative of a general peak station with a mezzanine above the tracks. And the design here is clearly older than the more modern touches on the recently-opened Silver Line.

Thirty-nine guessed correctly.


Image 5: King Street

The final image shows a station pylon at King Street. This one was a little tricky, I'll admit, which is why I put it last. I order the five images so that they increase with (what I believe to be) difficulty from first to last.

The entrance pylon at the corner of King Street and Diagonal Road was never updated after the Blue Line was extended from National Airport to Van Dorn Street in 1991 (the Yellow Line was extended from National Airport to Huntington, including King Street, in 1983).

Many of you were either familiar with the absence of the blue stripe on this pylon or correctly deduced that the letter just below the yellow stripe was a "K". King Street is the only station that starts with the letter K.

I know it was tempting to guess Huntington, since the first letter clearly wasn't an E, and only Eisenhower Avenue and Huntington are served only by the Yellow Line. However, this erroneously labled pylon is distinctive, and I left enough of the K, I thought, for this to be fair game.

Twenty-four of you figured it out anyway. Great work!

Thanks for playing! We'll be back in two weeks with our next quiz.

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

Photography


Think you know Metro? It's whichWMATA week 81

It's time for the eighty-first installment of our weekly "whichWMATA" series! Below are photos of five stations in the Washington Metro system. Can you identify each from its picture?


Image 1


Image 2


Image 3


Image 4


Image 5

We'll hide the comments so the early birds don't spoil the fun. Please have your answers in by noon on Thursday.

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

Transit


If Metro adds "Kennedy Center" and "National Mall" to station names, it will confuse riders

Metro has a long history of appending extra names to stations. It's a problem for several reasons, notably because of the confusion it causes, the complexity it adds to the map, and the cost to taxpayers. The latest proposals call for adding "National Mall" and "Kennedy Center" to station names. Both should be scuttled.


The Smithsonian Castle and eponymous Metro station. Photo by the author.

This Thursday, the WMATA Board will take up proposals to change the names of two stations: Foggy Bottom-GWU will become Foggy Bottom-GWU with a subtitle of Kennedy Center, and Smithsonian will get National Mall as a subtitle if the proposals pass. These suggestions come from the District government.

Metro's staff are recommending against renaming Foggy Bottom. Two-thirds of riders surveyed via their Amplify tool disliked the proposal. But they are recommending adding National Mall to Smithsonian because 54% of those surveyed supported the idea.

Metro's current policy limits station names to 19 characters, including the subtitles, which were a new innovation in 2011 which David Alpert and I devised in our contest to redesign the map.

Many stations' names predate that policy and violate that principle, some quite egregiously, like the 44-character U Street/African-Amer Civil War Mem'l/Cardozo. Both proposals before the board would also violate the rule.

Don't misinform riders

The thing about the National Mall is that it's actually quite a large place. It stretches two miles from the west steps of the Capitol to the Lincoln Memorial. Depending on where one is going, several different stations could suffice.


The National Mall and surrounding Metro stops. Image from Google Maps.

One complaint from tourists is that "Smithsonian" itself isn't particularly descriptive. If you're going to the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian isn't your stop. If you're going to the Smithsonian National Zoo, Cleveland Park is the closest (not, as you might expect, Woodley Park-Zoo/Adams Morgan).

Still, most of the Smithsonian museums are clustered in the area, and the Smithsonian Castle is only steps away from Smithsonian station. But the National Mall is an even bigger area. And parts of it are much easier to get to from other stops.

The Capitol Botanical Gardens are much closer to Capitol South and Federal Center SW. The Lincoln Memorial is more easily accessed from Foggy Bottom and Arlington Cemetery.

Adding "National Mall" to the Smithsonian station name may encourage even more riders to overcrowd the station trying to get to the National Mall, when really they would have been better off not transferring at L'Enfant Plaza (itself close to the Mall).

Metro already spends resources telling tourists and locals not to use Smithsonian to get to the Cherry Blossom Festival, the Fourth of July fireworks, and other major events. Adding the name will likely make that problem worse.

Also, the Mall is already on the map. One of the elements of the recent Metro map redesign is a dark green rectangle showing the extent of the National Mall. Smithsonian station is clearly within that rectangle, and as a result, adding the name is clearly overkill.


The National Mall is shown on the map already. Image from WMATA.

Compared to other cities, our system has lots of ambiguity and confusion

One of the reasons that Metro keeps names short is because in terms of wayfinding, complex names add complexity and reduce how easy it is to comprehend the system.

Consider other cities.

With few exceptions, Montreal's Metro uses one-word names, generally named after the cross street or a nearby feature. Stations like Atwater, Place-des-Armes, and Saint-Laurent are easily understood, even by non French speakers (though Lionel-Groulx is quite the mouthful).

In New York, stations are very concise. South Ferry. 72. Pelham Bay Park. Chicago keeps it short, too. Damen. Howard. Randolph/Wabash.

Los Angeles largely uses intersections. Vermont/Sunset. Exposition/Crenshaw. Pershing Square.

These short names are good because they're easy to understand, they're descriptive, and they're largely unambiguous. New York and Chicago do have issues with repeated names (in Chicago, there are two Clintons, for example).

One example of how we do things differently is Mount Vernon Square. In Washington, it's an important station because it serves as a terminal for the Yellow Line. Trains headed into the city frequently carry its name on destination signs. Tourists need to be able to find the station quickly on the map to figure out where the train is bound.

But Mount Vernon Square is really called Mount Vernon Sq-7th St-Convention Center. And some signage in the system calls it simply "Convention Center". For instance, at Gallery Place, signs on the lower level say that Yellow trains headed north are bound for "Fort Totten via Convention Center." But when those trains show up, they say "Mount Vernon Square." So which is it?


To Fort Totten via "Convention Center." Photo by the author.

Someone might tell an out of town guest to meet them at the Chinatown Metro, but when the train operator calls it simply "Gallery Place," they don't alight. That's a problem.

Or when listening to an announcement that trains are "single tracking between Dunn Loring Merrifield and West Falls Church University of Virginia Virginia Tech," irregular riders can be excused for wondering whether that's two stations or six.

The western end of the Silver Line is Wiehle-Reston East. Many people simply call that station the "Reston" station. That's a problem because in a few years, Metro will open a new station at Reston Town Center. The real Reston station. But old habits die hard, and people will probably still call the station at Wiehle Avenue "Reston" or "Reston East."

Metro refuses to learn from its mistakes

Time and again, jurisdictions have submitted naming requests. There have been some truly awful suggestions, like Navy Yard- (with an actual curly "" logo for the Nationals, who play nearby. (Metro staff strongly recommended against that abomination.)

Often, however, the agency punts to the jurisdiction, saying that there's "no cost" to WMATA, since the local government is picking up the tab.

There is a cost to WMATA, though. The cost of comprehension and navigability.

Station names should really reflect simply one thing. That might be a street or intersection, a neighborhood, or a nearby venue. If something changes, like a new convention center being constructed, Metro should certainly consider changing station names. But only at the expense of actually removing the old name and replacing it.

Mount Vernon Square-7th Street-Convention Center should either be Mount Vernon Square or Convention Center. Not both.

So, if "National Mall" is so compelling to add to Smithsonian, it should replace the name Smithsonian. But that would be the wrong call, because as noted, the National Mall is a big place which is served by at least four other Metro stations.

It's time the name sprawl stopped. If you agree, contact the Metro Board and say that you oppose this change using the form below. But don't wait long. The vote is on Thursday.

Take action

First name:    Last name:

Email address:

Street:    City/state:

Transit


To save Maryland's second oldest tree, the Red Line moved

You probably didn't know that Maryland's oldest tree is Metro-accessible. It could have easily been sawdust without a shift in the Red Line.


The Linden Oak at center-right. The Metro viaduct at far left. Image from Google street view.

In the late 1970s, Metro planners moved the proposed alignment of the Red Line just south of Grosvenor station to fly above the median of Rockville Pike (MD 355) instead of running along the eastern side. That shift was to save what was then the second-oldest tree in Maryland, the Linden Oak.

In 2002, Maryland's oldest tree, the Wye Oak, died at the ripe old age of 462 when it was felled in a thunderstorm. The death of that tree promoted the Linden Oak to oldest tree in the state. Today, the white oak is about 300 years old.

The tree's champion was Montgomery County councilwoman Idamae Garrott, who successfully fought to get the proposed Metro tracks moved west.

Today, the Red Line tracks make an odd curve to the west after emerging from the subway and crossing the Beltway. After passing the Linden Oak, the tracks bend eastward to end up on the east side of Rockville Pike. Along the way, passengers on the right side of a northbound train can catch a glimpse of a tree older than the country.

Photography


Here are the answers to whichWMATA week 80

On Tuesday, we posted our eightieth photo challenge to see how well you knew Metro. I took photos of five Metro stations. Here are the answers. How well did you do?

This week, we got 30 guesses. Ten got all five. Great work Peter K, JamesDCane, DavidDuck, Stephen C, Chris H, AlexC, Solomon, FN, We Will Crush Peter K, and dpod!


Image 1: Greensboro

The first image shows the view looking westbound from the mezzanine at Greensboro station. Greensboro is one of just three stations with the soaring "gambrel" style roof. You can discount Wiehle Avenue because that station is located in a wide freeway median and doesn't have the lower v-shaped canopy visible at bottom center here. Tysons Corner is out because that station is not in the median of a roadway at all, it's off to the north side of Route 123.

So the process of elimination leaves us with Greensboro. But other clues include the buildings on either side, which you might recognize, and the long straightaway leading toward Spring Hill. Twenty-five knew this one.


Image 2: Dupont Circle

The next station is Dupont Circle. The photo here shows the wide bowl that holds the northern (Q Street) escalators after a snowfall. This entrance is probably the most distinctive in the system, and in fact, we've already featured this entrance no fewer than five times, in week 22, week 33, week 38, week 40, and week 53.

The main clue here is the circular walls, leaving lots of space between the escalators. The planters are just discernible under the snow, which was another hint. The vantage point provides a final clue, since most of Metro's escalators are in a concrete tube, only the broad opening at Dupont north allows this perspective.

Twenty-six guessed correctly.


Image 3: Takoma

The third image shows the elevator entrance to Takoma station. This somewhat foreboding opening leads to the elevator in the center of the platform. The escalators and station manager's booth are located farther south, at the end of the platform.

This entrance is fairly unique. Grosvenor and Deanwood do have entrances that are somewhat similar looking, but also distinct. The Red Line icon may have helped you narrow this down.

Twenty figured it out.


Image 4: Landover

This photo shows the view from the parking lot of Landover station. A few stations are built on embankments like this, with broad, open plazas leading to an entrance below the tracks. Notably, Landover, New Carrollton (east), Greenbelt (east), Shady Grove (east), and Twinbrook (east) have this setup.

But you can narrow this down to Landover and New Carrollton easily by noting the catenary and traction power transmission masts visible behind the station. These towers supply power to the electrified Amtrak Northeast Corridor, which runs alongside the Orange Line between Cheverly and New Carrollton.

It can't be New Carrollton because that station is quite different. To the right of the Metro entrance is a second opening for the Amtrak waiting room. A Greyhound Bus ticket window is located in the plaza, as is a distinctive clocktower. Additionally, from this angle at New Carrollton, you'd be able to see the parking structure on this side and office buildings on the opposite side of the tracks.

Nineteen correctly surmised that this was Landover.


Image 5: McPherson Square

The final image was the hardest. It shows the view looking upward while descending the escalator into McPherson Square's Franklin Square (14th Street) entrance. I debated for a while whether this image would be too hard, but many of you did guess correctly, so I suppose I should give you more credit.

The architecture and the fact that the entrance itself appears to be covered by a building means that this is probably a station in downtown Washington. The curvature of the building above (1400 Eye Street) was a major clue. We featured the same curve in week 39.

Other clues included the facade of 1350 Eye Street, taking up the right third of the image and the tip of one of the towers of One Franklin Square at center left.

Ten impressed me by getting the right answer.

Thanks for playing! We'll be back in two weeks with our next quiz.

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

Photography


Think you know Metro? It's whichWMATA week 80

It's time for the eightieth installment of our weekly "whichWMATA" series! Below are photos of five stations in the Washington Metro system. Can you identify each from its picture?


Image 1


Image 2


Image 3


Image 4


Image 5

We'll hide the comments so the early birds don't spoil the fun. Please have your answers in by noon on Thursday.

UPDATE: The answers are here.

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

Photography


Here are the answers to whichWMATA week 79 plus "Where's that Bikeshare?"

On Tuesday, we posted our seventy-ninth photo challenge to see how well you knew Metro. I took photos of five Metro stations. The answers are below, and if you scroll past them, you'll also find the answers to last week's Where's that Bikeshare?"


Image 1: L'Enfant Plaza

This week we got 41 guesses. Sixteen people got all five correct. Great work, Roger Bowles, Peter K, Trey, Andy L, Chris H, PieSuperPAC, Solomon, JamesDCane, FN, Travis Maiers, Donovan S, StephenC, Exit 130, Aaron R, Justin...., and We Will Crush Peter K!

The first image shows a sign on the lower level at L'Enfant Plaza. These signs are mounted on the concrete columns supporting the upper level of the station and are probably intended to shepherd easily-confused tourists onto trains headed toward Smithsonian, one stop west.

The other main clue is the vault wall. As opposed to the other downtown transfer stations and all the other underground vault-type stations, the vault wall at track level is vertical.Everywhere else, the vault slopes away from the trackbed before arcing through vertical higher up. The coffers here also start higher off the trackbed than they do at other waffle stations.

Twenty-seven got this one right.


Image 2: Braddock Road

The second image shows the view from the platform at Braddock Road. One primary clue is the Alexandria peak canopy, which appears only at Braddock Road and King Street. Additionally, the buildings in the distance could have helped you narrow this down. One even has a logo, "NIB," which indicates that the building houses the National Industries for the Blind.

Thirty-two figured this one out.


Image 3: Fort Totten

The third image shows the view looking north along the southbound Green Line platform at Fort Totten. There were a few clues here. For one, the gull canopy intersecting the mezzanine above. Except at Cheverly (which has side platforms) and Fort Totten, no other gull I station has a mezzanine above the tracks.

Additionally, the tunnel portal in the distance means this has to be Fort Totten. At no other gull station do the tracks emerge from underground so close to the station or with a vertical portal face. Most of WMATA's subway portals have v-shaped openings above the tracks instead of square vertical openings.

Thirty knew the right answer.


Image 4: Capitol South

The fourth image showed a platform pylon at Capitol South. Most of you easily figured out that the sign text ended with "uth," and correctly deduced that the only station name ending with those three letters was Capitol South. Other incorrect guesses included Farragut North and Georgia Ave-Petworth, but the letter before the t can't be an r. In fact, given Helvetica's character forms, it could only be d or u.

Thirty-five solved the puzzle correctly.


Image 5: Union Station

The final image shows the concourse level at the northern entrance to Union Station station. This is a familiar entrance to those who transfer daily between commuter trains at Metro, so many of you may have recognized it immediately. Another clue included the gate and grating (used to seal off the station when the system closes each night). At most stations, the gates are narrower and paired, like a set of double doors. Here, though, the gate is much wider and swings from one side only.

Additionally, the elevator here is a clue. At most stations, the elevator leads from the mezzanine to the street directly, so it's not indoor at the "up" end. You can tell that this is the upper end thanks to the down escalator at right and the grating here means that the photo was taken from outside the station. Finally, the flag visible to the left of the Metro logo narrowed the possibilities down, since flags (and the Metro logo) are only mounted at major stations.

Twenty-nine got it right.

Thanks for playing! We'll be back in two weeks with our next quiz.

Information about whichWMATA contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

Where's that Bikeshare?

Last week was the third time we've run another kind of mystery post: Capital Bikeshare's "Where's that Bikeshare?" We ran five images of CaBi stations and, like in whichWMATA, challenged you to identify them. Below are the answers:


Images 1 (left) and 2 (right). All images from Capital Bikeshare.

1. 37th and O Streets NW. That's no mere estate behind the stone wall—it's Georgetown University. The building poking it's head over the wall on the left is the Dean's building of the Jesuit university, not a church.

2. Constitution Avenue and 2nd Streets NW. The skyline of the National Gallery of Art, and the Washington Monument above it, make this a familiar sight for congressional staffers and tourists alike.


Images 3 (left) and 4 (right).

3. Dupont Circle. One of just a few stations with two rows of bikes, Dupont Circle is the only one in which this occurs for just a portion of this station. The sheer number of docks also give this one away as the system's largest station.

4. Pennsylvania Ave and Minnesota Avenue SE. This station is located next to Washington mainstay Mario's Pizza House, which is your first clue. The second is the slope of the hill, characteristic of the topography east of the Anacostia river.


Image 5.

5. Washington Boulevard and South Walter Reed Drive. Sandwiched between a major road and a gorgeous trail, this station is a commuter connection for many DC-bound Arlingtonians. You'll notice the highway signs says Ft. Myer and Columbia Pike, giving you a clue as to where this trail is heading.

Photography


Think you know Metro? It's whichWMATA week 79

It's time for the seventy-ninth installment of our weekly "whichWMATA" series! Below are photos of five stations in the Washington Metro system. Can you identify each from its picture?


Image 1


Image 2


Image 3


Image 4


Image 5

We'll hide the comments so the early birds don't spoil the fun. Please have your answers in by noon on Thursday.

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

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