Greater Greater Washington

Metro will shorten station names using subtitles

It will still take some time to fix the escalators, but Metro has found a solution to another smaller perennial annoyance for riders: unwieldy station names. They are adopting a suggestion that came out of our map contest, to break up long names into primary titles and subtitles.


Image from WMATA.

WMATA conducted 6 user focus groups on current and proposed station names. Participants generally agreed with the principles that have been proposed before, such as keeping station names simple, having them "evoke imagery," and tying them to locations people otherwise recognize.

They also felt strongly that any landmarks listed in a station name should lie within walking distance; this has been a criticism of some stations like Vienna/Fairfax-GMU, where George Mason University is 4.2 miles or over an hour's walk away.

In one clip played at today's Board meeting, participants in one focus group variously said they felt any place names should be no more than a 5-minute walk, 2 blocks, or "a few" blocks away, and strongly panned including any places that require a shuttle bus to reach from the station.

Station subtitles got strong acclaim, and Metro plans to start using this idea in maps beginning in June 2012. The one exception is the Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport station, where participants had mixed reviews for the idea of making the primary name "National Airport" with a subtitle listing the full name.

They didn't ask the focus groups about shortening already short names with universities or places of interest, such as Brookland-CUA, Shaw-Howard Univ, and Foggy Bottom-GWU. If most universities are going to become subtitles, it seems reasonable to do the same even for these. Besides, almost nobody says they're going to take Metro to "Brookland See You Eh Station."

The definite subtitled names will include:

  • Woodley Park-Zoo/Adams Morgan
  • New York Ave-Florida Ave-Gallaudet U
  • Mt. Vernon Sq/7th Street-Convention Center
  • Archives-Navy Memorial-Penn Quarter
  • West Falls Church-VT/UVA
  • U Street/African-Amer Civil War Memorial/Cardozo
  • Vienna/Fairfax-GMU
  • Georgia Ave-Petworth
  • Grosvenor-Strathmore
  • Rhode Island Ave-Brentwood
During the WMATA Board's discussion today, member Jeff McKay from Fairfax suggested that the policy also require that the primary name for the station be closer than a secondary item. For example, Woodley Park-Zoo/Adams Morgan appropriately puts Woodley Park first, since the station is in Woodley Park and only near the other elements.

Based on this, the Mt. Vernon Square/7th Street-Convention Center station perhaps should be rearranged to something like Convention Center/Mt. Vernon Square-7th Street. The convention center is right at the station, but Mount Vernon Square itself is actually 2 whole blocks away, and actually equidistant from that station and the northernmost exit from Gallery Place.

And then there's New York Avenue station, which isn't even on New York Avenue at all, is really long, and just takes its name from 2 very long roads. There have been proposals to switch it to NoMa-Gallaudet U. This is shorter, reflects a real place as opposed to two long streets, and helps brand the emerging neighborhood.

However, the presentation says the focus group participants weren't keen on many of the possible station name changes staff bounced off them, including this one. Still, that might come from unfamiliarity and a general lack of enthusiasm for the name "NoMa"; officials should still consider making the change. Many people don't realize, for instance, that the station actually isn't on New York Avenue at all.

The participants did like two potential station name changes: "Smithsonian-National Mall" and adding some information about the Nationals to Navy Yard, whether a curly W logo or the words "Ballpark" or "Nationals." They didn't like also adding "Capitol Riverfront," the name of the BID.

Three other potential changes got mixed reviews: "Forest Glen-Holy Cross Hospital," "Waterfront-Arena Stage," and "King Street-Old Town." What do you think of these?

The focus groups disliked the proposed Silver Line station names, with the exception of "Tysons I&II" and "Reston Town Center." Matt Johnson noted that "Tysons I&II" will look terrible in the sans-serif Helvetica font Metro uses, but it's probably true that it does reflect what's there. Still, why can't it at least be something like "Tysons Malls" if not something more interesting?

The Riders' Advisory Council also sent a letter to the Board noting that the repetition could confuse many people, including tourists or people with cognitive disabilities. One member joked that it would probably confuse her as well, even though she has no cognitive disability.

Here's the list of all station names that were evaluated. These aren't necessarily official proposals or endorsed by staff, the board, or anyone else. The official procedure for evaluating name changes is for a jurisdiction to formally request one, and nobody has yet done this for any stations except the upcoming Silver Line stations.

  • Georgia Ave-Petworth/Park View
  • Navy Yard-Capitol Riverfront
  • Navy Yard with Curly W (Washington Nationals logo)
    Forest Glen-Holy Cross Hospital
  • Waterfront-Arena Stage
  • Smithsonian-National Mall
  • Old Town or King Street-Old Town
  • McPherson Square-Chicago School of Psychology
  • Judiciary Square/Georgetown University Law School
  • NoMa Gallaudet U NoMa-Gallaudet U
  • Rosslyn/Georgetown University
  • West Hyattsville/Mt. Ranier
  • Farragut North/Golden Triangle
  • Anacostia/Frederick Douglass House
  • White Flint North Bethesda
Looking at all these names, and ones above, brings up another issue: dashes and slashes. Why is it Vienna/Fairfax-GMU but West Falls Church-VT/UVA? Or, on the list of names evaluated, McPherson Square-Chicago School of Psychology but Anacostia/Frederick Douglass House (both atrocious, by the way, which thankfully the focus groups agreed about and probably staff just threw in there to have something on the extremes)?

According to the presentation, there was one other interesting innovation participants liked: the idea of putting small icons on each station. Lance Wyman, who is redesigning the Metro map, is eager for the idea, which he actually proposed 40 years ago but which didn't get adopted at the time. Maybe it will now?


Image from WMATA.
David Alpert is the founder and editor-in-chief of Greater Greater Washington. He worked as a Product Manager for Google for six years and has lived in the Boston, San Francisco, and New York metro areas in addition to Washington, DC. He now lives with his wife and daughter in Dupont Circle. 

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I'm glad to see that Metro is considering "shortening" some of the station names (or at least making them easier on the eyes).

Part of me likes the idea of putting icons on the station dots, but does every station need an icon? I think it would be very effective for some stations (Capitol South, for example), but for others, I don't see the benefit (L'Enfant Plaza). Also, what about stations that are close to multiple points of interest, or points of interest that aren't close to any Metro stations? Food for thought.

by Rebecca on Jul 7, 2011 11:37 am • linkreport

I think it's a good idea to shorten the names as much as possible for all stations. It's what people use anyway, nobody uses the long forms when giving directions or refering to the stations.

Personally I like the NoMa idea. But I have friends that absolutely despise what they think is "unecessary" and "unestablished" neighborhood name shortening. I guess though if you used NoMa you'd also have to use CoHe (for Col. Heights) a shortened neighborhood name that is actually catching on and etc...etc..where does it stop? And then next thing you know they build a station in Gtown under the Whitehurst called DUWO. (Down Under the Whitehurst Overpass). HAHA. It can go too far and totally confuse visitors.

I think Waterfront should stay short and no need to add Arena Stage. As much as I want to promote theatre in DC, if that were the case, then we'd have to add Shakespeare Theatre Company and Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company to Archives-Navy Memorial-Penn Quarter station (both theatres are less than 2 blks away from that station) and tons of other examples...National Theatre and Warner are also close to stations, etc...Why should Arena get special treatement?

In any case, my prediction is that the whole Waterfront neighborhood, once the redevelopment takes place, will take off as a neighborhood and well, the station name will make sense simplified as just Waterfront then.

The icons seem like a neat idea, but not sure they'd work--as not everyone (esp. visitors) know what the icons mean, nor does everyone have a common reference to images. An eagle means government? Really? Why? If you are from another country, you may think it means a Bird Observatory. Honestly, I think the icons might end up making things more confusing.

Keep the station names as short as possible and keep them related to the names of the neighborhoods they are in, not buildings or theatres or specific locations. That's my 2c.

by LuvDusty on Jul 7, 2011 12:03 pm • linkreport

Probably the first good idea I've seen from Metro in a long time. I'm glad the focus groups didn't like the Silver Line names, they were utter garbage and a four year old child could come up with more creative and useful titles.

I'm not totally sold on the icons. A good idea but how many icons can you make? Would only some stations have icons? I can't imagine what an icon for Forest Glen or Dunn Loring would be. That L'Enfant Plaza icon looks more like the Silver Spring logo, and Federal Center SW is just the presidential seal or whatever.

by Martin on Jul 7, 2011 12:07 pm • linkreport

The icon doesn't need to be a literal representation of the station's name or of the neighborhood, it just need to be unique. That's its value - as a supplement to the other navigation systems in place.

by Alex B. on Jul 7, 2011 12:15 pm • linkreport

The icons look stupid. If they are supposed to be for tourists, then use them only on the Mall. because they will be impossible to see on any map from more than a foot away.

Keep the station names as short as possible and keep them related to the names of the neighborhoods they are in, not buildings or theatres or specific locations.
I'll agree with that, though I think artificial neighborhoods should not be there - it should remain Archives, not become Penn Quarter. NoMa.. whatever fake new york wannabes.

by greent on Jul 7, 2011 12:16 pm • linkreport

@greent

OK, what would you call the Noma station, then?

New York Avenue? That's hardly evocative. It's not even accurate (the station isn't on NY Ave, and NY Ave itself is a long corridor).

I like the idea of subtitles, but I'd officially drop the subtitles from the actual titles. I think it's fine to list destinations in the area, but they shouldn't be part of the name. Kind of like an old department store elevator operator: "5th floor, housewares, men's formal wear, men's shoes. 5th floor. Going up!"

by Alex B. on Jul 7, 2011 12:24 pm • linkreport

I am all for eliminating Street names and replacing them with neighborhood names whenever possible, with the Exception of perhaps U Street.

-Georgia Avenue is misleading. Georgia Avenue runs from Shaw to Howard County. Call that station "Park View" or "Pleasant Plains" or something.

-Same with Minnesota Avenue. I think "River Terrace" might be appropriate, or "South Deanwood" or something.

-I'll also take "Seat Pleasant" over Addison Road.

-As for NY and FL Avenues, I could live with NoMa, Eckington, or Truxton.

-King Street could be renamed Alexandria Union Station, though admittedly longer than its current name.

-Morgan Blvd = Summerfield (subtitled FedEx Field/Dan Snyder cash cow)

-Southern Av and/or Naylor Road could be renamed Hillcrest Heights

-Branch Av = Camp Springs

-Drop the Rhode Island Avenue from the Brentwood station

I don't know off the top of my head good names for Van Dorn Street or Eisenhower Avenue, but I'm sure Alexandrians can better comment on that. Also, I hope the Silver Line gets on board with this. Neighborhood identity in Tyson's Corner will probably be a psychological bolster for attempting to urbanize that mess.

by Dave Murphy on Jul 7, 2011 12:29 pm • linkreport

Clearly everyone should start calling the so-called "NoMa" area Swampoodle instead!

NoMa may be trendy/fakeish/whatever, but at least it describes a place/area, New York Ave/Florida Ave describes an intersection that certainly isn't any sort of center of activity that the station serves.

I've got it! Dave Thomas Circle-Gallaudet U!

by MLD on Jul 7, 2011 12:29 pm • linkreport

I think the Metro map is crowded enough as is -- adding icons would just create more visual confusion and could cause people to question if they're getting off on the right stop, if they can't figure out what the icon represents, or mis-interpret it. From far away, I think this would make the map look extremely jumbled as well.

Utilizing sub-titles, however, is great. Go ahead and emphasize what we all already call the stations anyways!

by alison on Jul 7, 2011 12:31 pm • linkreport

I'm not quite sold on King St. - Old Town. It doesn't sound quite right to me, for some reason. Perhaps King St. - Old Town Alexandria? Other neighborhoods I don't know as well.

Though it's fun to speculate what a hyphenated name for Huntington would be...

by Ser Amantio di Nicolao on Jul 7, 2011 12:32 pm • linkreport

+1 for Swampoodle

by Dave Murphy on Jul 7, 2011 12:35 pm • linkreport

@Alex: what is the name of the neighborhood? Oh yeah, it's Near Northeast. NoMA is a fake new name created in the '90's to increase gentrification-ability. It is part of Near Northeast. It has a name, use the name it has.

And stop stealing ideas from New York. SoMA, NoMa stupidity.

And Yes, I will remind people the U Street is a corridor in the neighborhood of Shaw, and I live in the Reed-Cooke section of the Adams Morgan neighborhood (though many want Reed-Cooke broken off from AM). Just so's you know I am consistent.

by greent on Jul 7, 2011 12:35 pm • linkreport

I'll add a +1 for Swampoodle - resurrect the name of the neighborhood destroyed by past urbanization.

by greent on Jul 7, 2011 12:38 pm • linkreport

Mexico City Metro uses icons (designed by Lance Wyman, by the way). It's for illiterate riders and I believe is effective. Not sure what our literacy issues are here, but the icons can reinforce the words.

The icon discussion will be fun. I'll start: U Street should get a hot dog.

Some will be easy (like National Airport, until we get a Dulles station). Others more challenging.

by Ward 1 Guy on Jul 7, 2011 12:44 pm • linkreport

"North" Bethesda? Really isn't that Southern Rockville?

by Tina on Jul 7, 2011 12:46 pm • linkreport

Good idea, lame work out. Subtitles are useless. Too small font on virtually any map to be readable. Come on metro, bite the bullet and just shorten the names.
Woodley Park-Zoo/Adams Morgan
Mt. Vernon Sq/7th Street-Convention Center
Archives-Navy Memorial-Penn Quarter
West Falls Church-VT/UVA
U Street/African-Amer Civil War Memorial/Cardozo
Vienna/Fairfax-GMU
Georgia Ave-Petworth
Rhode Island Ave-Brentwood

Georgia Ave-Petworth/Park View
Navy Yard-Capitol Riverfront
Navy Yard with Curly W (Washington Nationals logo)
Forest Glen-Holy Cross Hospital
Waterfront-Arena Stage
Smithsonian-National Mall
Old Town or King Street-Old Town Alexandria
McPherson Square-Chicago School of Psychology
Judiciary Square/Georgetown University Law School
NoMa Gallaudet U NoMa-Gallaudet U
Rosslyn/Georgetown University
West Hyattsville/Mt. Ranier
Farragut North/Golden Triangle
Anacostia/Frederick Douglass House
White Flint North Bethesda

And to add to that:
Franconia-Springfield
Gallary Places-Chinatown
Dunn Loring-Merriefield
Stadium-Armory

by Jasper on Jul 7, 2011 12:46 pm • linkreport

I like the names as have been proposed and I'm totally in favor of eliminating road names for the reasons mentioned. They're not places.

I completely and totally detest the station icons. Putting well-known landmarks on the Metro map is one thing but those insanely hokey icons would be a visual eyesore. Imagine staring at a map that had those icons at every station... my head hurts just thinking about it.

by Adam L on Jul 7, 2011 12:47 pm • linkreport

@ Ward 1 guy:Not sure what our literacy issues are here

30% of Washingtonians is functionally illiterate.

by Jasper on Jul 7, 2011 12:49 pm • linkreport

Some systems use icons for the end of line stations, which helps with wayfinding. I noted this in San Jose, CA on the VTA light rail. The book "Transit Maps of the World" notes station icons in Mexico City, though I don't see them on the map (as noted by ward 1 guy above)

See http://www.flickr.com/photos/perkinsms/2801200049/

by Michael Perkins on Jul 7, 2011 12:50 pm • linkreport

I live and DC and don't really understand how NOMA is a good descriptor for the NYAve stop. If someone asked me to describe it, I would have no idea how.

The station itself is closer to NY and FL AVe's than it is to Galludet in the first place.

What the heck is NoMA?

by HogWash on Jul 7, 2011 12:55 pm • linkreport

@Jasper-I like your sensibility. One possiblr complication: There are two metro stops in Hyattsville. (West) Hyattsville and Prince George's Plaza. The latter aches for a new name.

I Suggest "Queens Chapel" for the former b/c its the name of the immediate shopping district and neighborhood and "Belcrest" for the latter b/c its the name of the neighborhood street the stop is on.

by Tina on Jul 7, 2011 12:57 pm • linkreport

Oh and I like the icons idea but think they only really need to apply to specific landmarks.

Also, why shouldn't McPherson Square be McPherson Square/White House?

by HogWash on Jul 7, 2011 12:58 pm • linkreport

@Michael Perkins

I found the information about the iconography on the Mexico City system... http://www.metro.df.gob.mx/red/iconografia.html

I still think it's hokey.

by Adam L on Jul 7, 2011 12:59 pm • linkreport

Metro should be consistent and drop the local universities from the station names and have them just in subtitles. I'm thinking especially of Foggy Bottom/GWU, Brookland/CUA (who uses those initials, anyway?) and Van Ness/Yoodeecee.

by Bob on Jul 7, 2011 1:01 pm • linkreport

Why did College Park/UMD get away with no suggested change? Too far to walk from the station to the main campus, and the the stop is pretty far from the center of College Park too.

^ re; the 2nd Hyattsville stop - the immediate area w/ shops and apts across 410/E-W from the mall where the train stops gets referred to as "the Belcrest area".

by Tina on Jul 7, 2011 1:03 pm • linkreport

Ahem. As a Near Northeast resident, let me be the first to say that I welcome any attempt to give our neighborhood a unified name. Right now, it's a tossup between Near Northest, NoMa, Swampoodle, and Old City. I'm not hugely jazzed about being named NoMa, but it's nice to have a concrete identity. Maybe we'll just start referring to ourselves as ANC6C04.

(And speaking of concrete, can we make Crystal City's icon a cement truck?)

The poor chaps East of 8th, south of Florida Ave/Trinidad, and north of H still don't have a real name for their neighborhood.

My take on the names:

Good:

  • Navy Yard-Capitol Riverfront
  • Navy Yard with Curly W (Washington Nationals logo)
  • Waterfront-Arena Stage
  • Smithsonian-National Mall (No Brainer!)
  • King Street-Old Town

Okay:

  • Georgia Ave-Petworth/Park View (Remove GA Ave from the name entirely, and I'll like this more.)
  • Farragut North/Golden Triangle
  • West Hyattsville/Mt. Ranier
  • NoMa Gallaudet U NoMa-Gallaudet U
  • White Flint North Bethesda

Bad:

  • McPherson Square-Chicago School of Psychology (Or, you know... The White House.)
  • Judiciary Square/Georgetown University Law School
  • Rosslyn/Georgetown University (Not only far apart, but in the wrong state)
  • Anacostia/Frederick Douglass House (Big Chair!)
  • Forest Glen-Holy Cross Hospital
  • Swampoodle. Swampoodle was closer to Union Station and the GPO than it is to present-day NoMa. NoMa used to be a freight yard, and has literally no history as a residential area, hence the lack of an "authentic" name. I'm not sure how I feel about co-opting the name of a dead neighborhood.
  • Icons
  • Every station name on the Silver Line

My Suggestions:

  • Brentwood - Ivy City
  • Mt. Vernon / Convention Center (No 'Sq.')
  • Shaw (Drop HU from the name)
  • Southwest Waterfront
  • U Street (Drop Cardozo. This is the ONLY case where I'll gladly accept a street name in the station name.)

(And in the time it took to type this, it looks like others have jumped in to say much of the same. Oh well.)

by andrew on Jul 7, 2011 1:06 pm • linkreport

The icon for Farragut North should be a lobbyist's hand reaching into a pocket. (My stop, but not me!)

Since I moved to Washington, the names people actually use have gotten shorter while the official names got longer. Dupont Circle and Woodley Park Zoo are now Dupont and Woodley. Boston leaves squares, circles, and parks out of names, and we should too.

I'd also shorten Largo Town Center to just Largo.

by Ben Ross on Jul 7, 2011 1:07 pm • linkreport

+ a billion for Swampoodle.

by monkeyrotica on Jul 7, 2011 1:08 pm • linkreport

One thing: Mount Vernon Square is the name of the neighborhood around the station. Just because people forget we're there, and that Mount Vernon Triangle broke off on its own, doesn't mean it doesn't have a name. Shaw doesn't count. The square may be distant, but the station lies smack in the middle of the neighborhood named for it.

by OctaviusIII on Jul 7, 2011 1:13 pm • linkreport

@andrew-how about "Freight Yard" as name? Or "Old Freight Yard". I like it. It names a specific area and is historic.

by Tina on Jul 7, 2011 1:16 pm • linkreport

@andrew:

The poor chaps East of 8th, south of Florida Ave/Trinidad, and north of H still don't have a real name for their neighborhood.

Might I suggest Tobago? :-)

(I know, I know, that's northeast of Trinidad.)

by Ser Amantio di Nicolao on Jul 7, 2011 1:23 pm • linkreport

@Michael Perkins: That Book is awesome! I love it!

Anyways, as a "NoMa" resident, I don't like the whole NoMa thing. "North of Mass Ave" is a HORRIBLE name of a neighborhood, espcially one which already has two perfectly good names (My vote would be for Old City over Near Northeast as a station name, although Swampoodle would be excellent!)

by Whattheheckis"Noma"? on Jul 7, 2011 1:27 pm • linkreport

With regards to the literacy question, how would, for instance, a hot dog icon for U Street help an illiterate passenger know where to get off? That assumes knowledge of Ben's Chili Bowl's existence AND significance just to clue the person in to where they might be getting off.

I just don't think you can make the icons clear enough to warrant the "helps the illiterate" argument in every case.

Also, yeah! McPherson Sq/White House! Why has that never been brought up? I've never heard of the Chicago School of Psychology...

by alison on Jul 7, 2011 1:33 pm • linkreport

@Dave Murphy

Calling the Rhode Island Avenue station just "Brentwood" would create confusion with the town of Brentwood, Md., which is further up Rhode Island Avenue (though I know that part of DC is also called Brentwood).

I'm not really sure why they want to strip Petworth from the "Georgia Avenue" station. I like "Petworth-Park View," personally. Alliteration is fun, and the name recognizes that the station is at the intersection of two neighborhoods. (Three if you count Pleasant Plains, but I've never been clear as to where that actually is.)

by dan reed! on Jul 7, 2011 1:41 pm • linkreport

I've said it before, but I guess I have to keep saying it: NoMa is an awful name for a neighborhood, and it must be quashed. "NoMa" stands for "North of Massachusetts Ave." Half of DC is north of Massachusetts. Tenleytown is north of Massachusetts. Deanwood is north of Massachusetts. The name tells you nothing. And it's not as if there aren't other possibilities. You could use the historical name: Swampoodle. You could refer to the most obvious geographic feature: Union Yards. You could make up a new name for all I care. Just don't call it NoMa.

by tom veil on Jul 7, 2011 1:49 pm • linkreport

@Dan Reed: well, if people can eventually learn that the Takoma metro is in DC, and not Takoma Park, MD.... can't people learn that there are 2 places with similar/same names. Esp. as Brentwood MD is not on any metro line?

by greent on Jul 7, 2011 1:50 pm • linkreport

greent:
The difference is that Takoma, DC and Takoma Park, MD are adjacent. The Takoma Metro station is in DC, but is less than a block from the Maryland border.

Brentwood, DC and Brentwood, MD are not adjacent, but are close enough to cause confusion.

by Matt Johnson on Jul 7, 2011 1:53 pm • linkreport

@greent- yes people can learn but its called "Takoma" in DC and "Takoma Park" in MD and typically in conversation one distiguishes by saying "Takoma DC" when a listener is confused, which one could easily do for Brentwood DC too.

by Tina on Jul 7, 2011 1:56 pm • linkreport

How about we get rid of those pesky useless vowels too?:

•Wdly Prk
•Nw Yrk
•Mt. Vnn Sq/7th St
•Archvs-Nvy Mmrl
•Wst Flls Chrch
•U St
•Vnn/Frfx

by aaa on Jul 7, 2011 1:57 pm • linkreport

@Tom Veil, is Union Yards the same thing as the freight yard that andrew referred to?

by Tina on Jul 7, 2011 1:58 pm • linkreport

Why is it that New York Ave couldnt have been N Street, M Street, 2nd Street or Eckington Station from the beginning

@andrew

Whats wrong with Cardozo; and why is a street name acceptable in this case and not the others?

@Dave Murphy

Morgan Blvd was orginally supposed to be called Summerfield; there is no way you can confuse Morgan Blvd the Blvd is only about 2 Miles.

Southern Ave is now where near Hillcrest Heights it would be better off as Shipley Terrace or even United Medical Center

Why not change U Street why should there be an exception

Minnesota Ave is not accessible to River Terrace it would be better renamed as one of the side streets Grant, Gault or Hayes. If there is an exception to the no street rule it is Minnesota Ave because there is no neighborhood there.

by kk on Jul 7, 2011 1:58 pm • linkreport

Two unrelated thoughts:
1. That L'Enfant icon won't work; it looks too much like the Silver Spring logo. Honestly, the L'Enfant icon should be a government worker dressed in business casual. But since we're not going to get that, I'd look to the future when the Eisenhower Memorial is built, and use the ubiquitous image of Eisenhower on the dime as the icon.
2. Add me to the chorus: let's just call it "U St." Unlike most street names, U St is a very short street, and it's become the name for the neighborhood, too. I know back in the '60s people called that area Cardozo, but no one does anymore. Cardozo high school probably has the most beautiful views in the city, but the only people who are taking Metro to it on a regular basis are the students and teachers.

by tom veil on Jul 7, 2011 2:00 pm • linkreport

@ Tina: There are two metro stops in Hyattsville. (West) Hyattsville and Prince George's Plaza. The latter aches for a new name.

PG Plaza is an awful name. I don't know that area too well. Both stations surely can get better names.

@ Bob:Foggy Bottom/GWU, Brookland/CUA (who uses those initials, anyway?)

Most people at The George Washington University like to abbreviate their school's name to GW. Not GWU though. GWU is actually against the school's branding rules.

@ alison:how would, for instance, a hot dog icon for U Street help an illiterate passenger know where to get off?

The point is that a hot dog sign would be recognizable and describable to an illiterate, while Как поживаешь would not. Get off at the hot dog station is a thing anyone can do. Get off at お名前は何ですか is a lot harder, especially when the previous station looked like お願いします. Imagine the confusion at Pentagon and Pentagon City, or East and West Falls Church. People who can read go wrong there. Yesterday I watched to young tourists debate whether Pentagon was Pentagon City. I resolved the issue by telling Pentagon City was the next stop.

by Jasper on Jul 7, 2011 2:04 pm • linkreport

@Tina/Andrew:
Yep, we're talking about the same freight yard. My only disagreement with Andrew is a small nitpick: it didn't just used to be a freight yard, it still is one. Most of the warehouses and some of the spur tracks are gone, but if you hang out on the Metro platform on a clear day, you can see that the whole tangle of tracks from Union Station all the way out to Rhode Island is still in use.

by tom veil on Jul 7, 2011 2:05 pm • linkreport

I'm not sure what I think of the icons. I think they might add too much clutter to the map, but I'm keeping an open mind.

I agree that the L'Enfant Plaza logo seems a bit odd. But I think Silver Spring's logo should be an acorn. Or failing that, a penguin.

by Matt Johnson on Jul 7, 2011 2:05 pm • linkreport

I predict that this comment thread will go to about 90. Lots to say here -- mostly good!

by Gavin on Jul 7, 2011 2:05 pm • linkreport

@Jasper: Love your attitude towards taking the ax to the names, but you might be overly aggressive in a few places.

Mt. Vernon Square is a legit neighborhood.

National Mall for Smithsonian might be too general, but that's always been a problem with that station, so whatever.

Dropping 'Square' off the names of things that actually are Squares (Judiciary, McPherson) probably is too much.

Why not make West Hyattsville into Mt. Rainer, since both West Hyattsville and PG Plaza are in Hyattsville?

Having an unqualified "Farragut" while also having a qualified "Farragut West" seems inconsistent.

There still is a Stadium at Stadium-Armory, and indeed originally was just called 'Stadium'.

I agree with others who are against using 'marketing names' on stations. It's admittedly sometimes hard to parse, but something like 'Golden Triangle' isn't really anything more than the BID's attempt at branding. Nobody calls it "Golden Triangle" (do they? Correct me if I'm wrong). So don't name things 'NoMa' or 'DoWiSeTrePla' or whatever, and drop the universities and the specific businesses - I'm looking at you, Waterfront-Arena Stage.

by Distantantennas on Jul 7, 2011 2:06 pm • linkreport

"Why is it Vienna/Fairfax-GMU but West Falls Church-VT/UVA?"

dash separates unlike things, slash separates like things. duh.

by poop on a log on Jul 7, 2011 2:06 pm • linkreport

Stadium-Armory could use a new name. I've found that I have to explain all too often that, no, you don't want to get off at Stadium for Capitals game, you want to go to Gallery Place. Same thing for the Nationals. "Stadium" is just too vague when there are now 3 professional sports venues in the city. Even just a change to "RFK Stadium" would be helpful.

by Birdie on Jul 7, 2011 2:14 pm • linkreport

I like the idea of the icons, but I am unsure how they would look on a map. At the station i think they could look pretty cool.

I never knew the NoMa name was hated so much, but the better question would be: what the hell kind of icon would the use for it?

by Ryan on Jul 7, 2011 2:17 pm • linkreport

@distantantennas -Why not make West Hyattsville into Mt. Rainer... Because one of the criterion was the name had to be within 2 blocks of the stop. If 'West Hyattsville' doesn't cut it 'Mt. Rainier' is worse. The most descriptive place names for those two stops (W.Hvl & PGP), imo, are Queens Chapel and Belcrest.

by Tina on Jul 7, 2011 2:17 pm • linkreport

The idea of icons ONLY FOR LINE ENDS is growing on me. Even if the icons don't make any sense, it'll be easier for me to find my way if I'm looking for the "squirrel monkey"-bound train rather than trying to remember if I'm headed to Shady Grove or Glenmont.

It would also kick ass for giving directions to tourists:

"What you want to do is take the train that's going to the Maple Leaf, get off at the Sailboat and change to a train that's headed toward Squirrel Monkey. Ride three stops and get off at Swampoodle."

by Michael Perkins on Jul 7, 2011 2:22 pm • linkreport

I guess I implicitly added icons for transfer points. Those would be useful too.

by Michael Perkins on Jul 7, 2011 2:22 pm • linkreport

McPherson Square-Chicago School of Psychology (Or, you know... The White House.)

Funny, cause my pref. would just be McPherson Square, since there actually is a square there, called McPherson.

Technically, calling it The White House would be a bad idea cause well, The White House is actually closer to Farragut West station (0.2 mi accord. to Google Maps) than McPherson Square (0.4 mi).

by LuvDusty on Jul 7, 2011 2:23 pm • linkreport

@Ryan: Its just an incredibly stupid name, as it signifies nothing unique, or even remotely descriptive, about the area.
As for an icon... I dunno... the Uline Arena is very close to the station, but besides being a decaying wreck, it isn't well known nor especially distinctive looking. If they keep the Gallaudet subi-title, I wouldn't be tooooo opposed to the main building (I cant remember the name of that hall) being the icon.

by NoMa Hater on Jul 7, 2011 2:25 pm • linkreport

Why not change Federal Triangle to Smithsonian its near more of the Museums along with Archives.

What about about adding National Mall or Smithsonian to Federal Triangle, L'Enfant Plaza, Archives, and Federal Center SW as they are all as close to the majority of Smithsonian Museums as the Smithsonian Station is.

by kk on Jul 7, 2011 2:27 pm • linkreport

I don't see why there is so much anger against NoMa or other shortenings like that. I have a friend who absolutely loathes them, but she can't really tell me why.

SoHo is for South of Houston St. in NYC right? So it stands for the area immediately south of that Street. Not EVERYTHING south of that street.

So why not NoMa for North of Mass Ave? I don't see the problem at all. Plus, nowadays, with the proliferation of txting, we better get used to more and more shortening of words and more and abb. for stations/locations, etc...

I betcha most young 'uns under 20 are gonna use NoMa and CoHe like crazy. In 5-10 years we'll forget there was ever an argument about it.

Get ready for NARL (North Arlington), GTown, FriHi and much much more folks!

by LuvDusty on Jul 7, 2011 2:28 pm • linkreport

@Jasper, PG Plaza is an awful name. I don't know that area too well. Both stations surely can get better names.

The station itself is connected (by a walkway) to PG Plaza Mall. Like Pentagon City.

@tom Veil, NoMa" stands for "North of Massachusetts Ave." Half of DC is north of Massachusetts.

Thanks because I really never knew what that stood for. But now that I do, it is an even more odd labeling, especially considering that Mass Ave also extends into Ward 7..you know like from NW, through NE and into EOTR SE.

by HogWash on Jul 7, 2011 2:29 pm • linkreport

@Ryan: Its just an incredibly stupid name, as it signifies nothing unique, or even remotely descriptive, about the area.

So I assume you also hate SoHo, Tribeca and DUMBO in NYC? Seems you are in a minority there...

by LuvDusty on Jul 7, 2011 2:33 pm • linkreport

@HogWash:
Actually, the walkway only gets riders across East-West Highway. They're pedestrians between the station and the bridge and between the bridge and the mall (through the parking lot).

Additionally, the mall is no longer called "Prince George's Plaza". It's now called "The Mall at Prince George's".

Still, I like the station name, and I wouldn't change it.

by Matt Johnson on Jul 7, 2011 2:34 pm • linkreport

he station itself is connected (by a walkway) to PG Plaza Mall. Like Pentagon City.

The PGP stop serves the immediate neighborhood, which is on the same side of E-W/410 while the mall is on the other side (via overpass or crosswalk). O)k there are residences on that side of 410 too. But...

The vast majority of people using that stop aren't going to/coming from the mall, which is not even called Prince George's Plaza anymore, so the name of that stop is super lame in that its named for a mall and not the neighborhood it serves and the mall itself has been re-named.

by Tina on Jul 7, 2011 2:38 pm • linkreport

I just don't understand the insistence of Jasper and others to try and get rid of Springfield from Franconia/Springfield. "Downtown" Springfield and its mall is the primary destination around the station and Franconia is only tangentially located nearby and is only a CDP most people outside the area don't even know about. It's not even a mailing address (Franconia's zip codes are usually listed as "Alexandria", part of the amorphous monster that is "Fairfax County" Alexandria). Franconia just makes it more confusing for riders, especially when they see Springfield Mall and adjacent big box retail centers just across the Franconia-Springfield Parkway. If anything I believe calling it the "Springfield" station makes far more sense.

I do like the idea of renaming the Smithsonian station "National Mall". The Smithsonian museums are only part of the picture on the National Mall (admittedly perhaps the biggest part but still). The Mall is one of the world's great urban spaces and it deserves to be dignified as such.

by Mike O on Jul 7, 2011 2:41 pm • linkreport

@Matt Johnson -we seem to disagree on the name of that stop on the green line...I don't like and if I could I would change it.

by Tina on Jul 7, 2011 2:41 pm • linkreport

@NoMa Hater

I was not suggesting that I thought all the hate for NoMa as a name was unwarranted. I simply was unaware that so much hate existed. My friend lives in Truxton circle so he always calls that area that. I always like calling it the Truck Stop.

Anyways, I think its interesting to think about what icons would be used for the more residential and neighborhood stops. It just makes you think about what is the most established/important/respected/or liked landmark in each community. Some have very recognizable and liked places where little fanfare would result, but other places would really struggle with a consensus or any real landmark at all.

Finally, I can't ever see them taking the Zoo off of the Woodley Park metro stop name. All of the business owners thrive from the zoo traffic there, and they would run amok at just the thought of some tourists getting off at the Cleveland Park metro to get to the zoo. (not much farther and also a downhill walk).

by Ryan on Jul 7, 2011 2:49 pm • linkreport

I like the idea of icons for terminal stations and transfers. It would be better if that could be tied into a prominently displayed roundel on trains and possibly the graphics in stations.

Ser Amantio: The neighborhood name for Tobago is already taken, thank you very much.

by Neil Flanagan on Jul 7, 2011 2:54 pm • linkreport

+1 Swampoodle

As a fellow resident of Old City #1 (not to be confused with Old City #2)/NoMA/SoFla/Near Northeast, we really need a neighborhood name. Why not go back to the original name? Heck, we even have a play!

by chuck on Jul 7, 2011 2:57 pm • linkreport

@luvdusty: I dont care about what NY wants to call its neighborhoods. I do care that some corporate branding campaign is trying to give MY neighborhood, which already has a name (multiple good ones actually), a new one that lacks any form of character.

by NoMaHater on Jul 7, 2011 3:01 pm • linkreport

Forget every other station name, Gallery Place-Chinatown should have "MLK Library" attached to the existing name or become MLK Library-Chinatown. Why not? Nothing is more raw in capturing the essence of our city than MLK Library.

http://thewashingtonsyndicate.wordpress.com/2010/06/08/is-wmata-going-to-re-name-gallery-placechinatown-gallery-placechinatownmlk-library-they-need-to/

As an international precedent — in Paris, the Bibliothèque François Mitterrand has its own station name on the Paris Métro.

DC needs to get hip to the flip otherwise the "world class city" talk is bunk.

by 901 G 4IFE on Jul 7, 2011 3:03 pm • linkreport

@Jasper

Changing King Street to Alexandria makes no sense. Braddock Rd, Eisenhower & Van Dorn are also in Alexandria

by MikeH on Jul 7, 2011 3:11 pm • linkreport

@Neil Flanagan:

Well, if we're being geographically accurate, south and east of Trinidad is the Venezuelan coast. Specifically the state of Delta Amacuro.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delta_Amacuro

Mmmh, I don't know - it lacks a certain ring to it, no?

by Ser Amantio di Nicolao on Jul 7, 2011 3:11 pm • linkreport

@LuvDusty
I betcha most young 'uns under 20 are gonna use NoMa and CoHe like crazy.

Come on, nobody calls it "CoHe" (I assume pronounced Co-High, right?), do they? I've only heard it as a joke between friends.

by MLD on Jul 7, 2011 3:12 pm • linkreport

@MikeH:

For Eisenhower: how about Eisenhower-Carlyle? Ordinarily I'm against appending the name of a specific commercial development to a Metro station, but Carlyle has been the driving force behind developing that area over the past decade, and it's going to go even further.

Or maybe Eisenhower-Carlyle/Hoffmann? That covers both major developments.

by Ser Amantio di Nicolao on Jul 7, 2011 3:14 pm • linkreport

Despite an extensive branding effort for the name "Golden Triangle," I don't think I've ever heard it come out of anyone's mouth, even though I work smack in the middle of it. The name "Golden Triangle" sounds every bit like it was invented in a conference room. Even the pointy, yellow and grey logo is unpleasant. I think it's time that the BID cut its losses and use a real name. "Farrugut Square" would do just fine.

by Nat on Jul 7, 2011 3:14 pm • linkreport

Station icons intrigue me. At the stations near colleges, the college's initials could be removed from the station name if the icon could adequately represent each institution (e.g. Terrapin logo for College Park, ). If they wanted to preserve the initials they could be inscribed into the logo.

by Bobby on Jul 7, 2011 3:17 pm • linkreport

Yep, we're talking about the same freight yard. My only disagreement with Andrew is a small nitpick: it didn't just used to be a freight yard, it still is one. Most of the warehouses and some of the spur tracks are gone, but if you hang out on the Metro platform on a clear day, you can see that the whole tangle of tracks from Union Station all the way out to Rhode Island is still in use.

Actually, perhaps not. The area currently occupied by Constitution square (ie. the center of what is now NoMA) was a series of private freight sidings. Further north, there was the B&O freight depot, which extended all the way to Eckington Pl (where FedEx is now), and I think is an extension of Union Yards, although I could be mistaken there too.

This awesome old map should shed some light on the issue. (I do wish there was a similar pre-union station map...)

In any event. There were/are at least 2 different freight yards in that area. Possibly 3.

Whats wrong with Cardozo; and why is a street name acceptable in this case and not the others?

I like bulleted lists today.

  • Cardozo HS is really not much of a landmark.
  • Cardozo HS is almost closer to Columbia Heights than it is to U St. It's a bit far to include in the station name.
  • "U Street" is a distinct and well-known name for the neighborhood, as well as the street, and was known as such even before the Metro opened.
  • There is only one contiguous stretch of U St NE/NW that is longer than two blocks. Without further qualification, it's fairly safe to assume that "U St" refers to the 10-block stretch between 9th St NW and 19th St NW. All of it's an easy walk from the Metro Station.
  • If you still don't buy this explanation, I will accept Ellington Station as an acceptable renaming.

by andrew on Jul 7, 2011 3:20 pm • linkreport

@Matt, my bad. I thought that walkway took you from the metro to the other side of the hghwy which is where the mall is. Didn't know they changed it but the name itself doesn't offend my sensibilities. So we agree on that.

@LuvDustcalling it The White House would be a bad idea cause well, The White House is actually closer to Farragut West station (0.2 mi accord. to Google Maps) than McPherson Square (0.4 mi)

Understood, I would be willing to accept Farragut West/White House but both Farragut and McPherson are around the corner from the white house. Both are basically separated by the US Chamber. It terms of location, McPherson is better suited.

Glad I'm not the only one who thinks NoMA is branding gone rogue.

by HogWash on Jul 7, 2011 3:22 pm • linkreport

I agree that Petworth station with a Georgia Ave subtitle (or Georgia & New Hampshire Ave) makes a lot more sense than the other way around. Stations simply shouldn't be named after streets that cross the whole city! We don't have Connecticut Avenue (Woodley Park) station or 7th Street (Mt Vernon Sq), to name a few. Plus, everyone I know already refers to it as the Petworth stop, so the change wouldn't be a big deal.

by Caroline on Jul 7, 2011 3:28 pm • linkreport

Excellent changes noted here about station names. And the one suggestion about 'Tysons Malls' is an excellent improvement. Let me also applaud the use of station icons. They do not need to be incorporated on the maps...but would they ever add to the ambiance of the urban experience. Would add a most refreshing element to a system gone a bit stale.

by Pelham1861 on Jul 7, 2011 3:28 pm • linkreport

'@greent- yes people can learn but its called "Takoma" in DC and "Takoma Park" in MD and typically in conversation one distiguishes by saying "Takoma DC" when a listener is confused, which one could easily do for Brentwood DC too. "

Or, one could say Brentwood MD, as the only Brentwood on a metro line in the neighborhood in DC. Brentwood MD is not on the metro line, so there could be no confusion for people who live here (and I don't see Brentwood MD as some huge tourist/business destination).

I never call it Takoma DC. It is Takoma and Takoma Park. Education is key.

by greent on Jul 7, 2011 3:32 pm • linkreport

I've always liked the name Willoughby. A stop at Willoughby would be nice. A pleasant trip back in time. Submitted for your approval.

by Ghost of Rod Serling on Jul 7, 2011 3:35 pm • linkreport

@Ghost: well played.

by Michael Perkins on Jul 7, 2011 3:48 pm • linkreport

for all you NoMa haters, why not just NeNo?

problem solved.

also, get rid of the 7th St for the Convention Center. no one's confused anymore.

by jkc on Jul 7, 2011 3:50 pm • linkreport

@greent -I never call it Takoma DC. It is Takoma and Takoma Park. Me either, but sometimes the person I'm talking too doesn't know the difference/is confused, so I clarify; "the swimming pool at the Takoma Rec Center"..."no, Takoma DC, at Van Buren and 3rd NW"... e.g.

I agree Brentwood MD, or even North Brentwood* MD is not a major destination unless you live there.

*There are two signs on northbound R.I. Ave: One welcoming you to North Brentwood and the other stating "North Brentwood" and then there is a sign welcoming you to the City of Hyattsville all within a quarter -1/2 mile. I don't know if Brentwood, MD and North Brentwood are two distinct municipalities.

by Tina on Jul 7, 2011 3:52 pm • linkreport

All the arguments just prove that no matter what the stations are named people will complain and disagree.

What's the point? btw, I'm fine with what Metro has done. But "Ronald Reagan" should be removed and the station go back to being "National Airport". No one here wanted that change, why should we promote it?

by Bob See on Jul 7, 2011 3:56 pm • linkreport

So can we go back to National Airport now or do we have to arm wrestle every GOP Member of Congress first?

by Redline SOS on Jul 7, 2011 3:59 pm • linkreport

Regarding the name Franconia-Springfield: I live east of there in Kingstowne and most of us here refer to that stop as the "Springfield Metro." Part of that is because it's across the street from Springfield Mall, part of it is for convenience, and part of it is that I think most people think of that area as Springfield. Most of us in Kingstowne don't think of any of this area as "Franconia." The Postal Service allows the use of "Franconia" and "Kingstowne" as alternate addresses for the odious "Alexandria" (a usage I, for one, hate because two-thirds of the "Alexandria" addresses are actually in Fairfax County), but the name "Franconia" seems to be mostly consigned to older residents and to the people who put up the big green signs on the Beltway. Even the real estate agents don't use it as often any more--they tend to use "Springfield" or "Kingstowne" because they believe those names have more allure.

But the original reason for the name "Franconia-Springfield" is fairly simple: There were originally two stops planned, with the one now existing to have been "Franconia" and another never-built stop to the northwest to have been "Springfield." The Yellow Line was to have two spurs to those two stops. There's a map somewhere in Zachary Schrag's book that depicts the general idea. As I recall, the spur to the "Springfield" stop failed environmental review and was scrapped, so WMATA just combined the two names into one stop.

I would leave "Springfield" on that stop if it were to be shortened because Springfield has become the defining term for that area, not just because of the mall but also because of the Springfield Interchange's status as a major landmark and because of plenty of other development under the name "Springfield." If I tell someone I live in "Kingstowne," they may know where that is if they're from eastern Fairfax County or Alexandria. If I say I live "near Springfield," or "just east of Springfield," just about anyone in the DC area has a general idea of where that is. (Funny, I never say "south of Alexandria," perhaps because "east of Springfield" seems more definitive because you run into the river before too long. But I sometimes say "south of the Beltway off Van Dorn Street" if I need to be more specific.)

Regarding the Van Dorn Street stop: I don't think there's really any good alternate name because there's nothing recognizable enough within easy, legitimate walking distance. Landmark Mall is a good half-hour walk for most people. (My wife used to live off Yoakum Parkway before we got married and that's about the same distance as the mall. Took her and her friends half an hour if they walked.) Cameron Station is a similar distance and isn't really descriptive of the larger area. "West End" is not a term used by many people outside of the city government and it doesn't cover Landmark or the area where the Metro stop is. Leave it as Van Dorn Street. Riders are used to that name, it's about the best landmark there is there, and no other subway stop is ever likely to be built elsewhere along Van Dorn. One of WMATA's big objections to using street names was concern over ambiguity of the sort you see in New York where you have multiple stops on different lines with the same names, but that isn't going to happen with Van Dorn.

Street names aren't always bad as subway stop names!

by Rich on Jul 7, 2011 4:03 pm • linkreport

Actually, there IS a silver lining to keeping the "Ronald Reagan" name...if Metro goes the icons route. (Which I must confess I rather like.) When the Dulles extension opens all the way, the airport could use a simple airplane logo. National could use a stylized Ronald Reagan...by now I think he's recognizable enough that it would work.

I suppose Dulles COULD use a stylized portrait of John Foster Dulles, but that's just crazy talk right there.

by Ser Amantio di Nicolao on Jul 7, 2011 4:04 pm • linkreport

BTW, following up on the point about similarly-named stops from my last comment, I looked at the New York map and I see five different stops named 23 Street (one each on the 8th Avenue, 7th Avenue, Broadway, 6th Avenue, and Lexington Avenue lines), as well as Court Square-23 Street in Queens. That's what WMATA was, understandably, trying to avoid with street names. But there's always a legitimate exception to that sort of principle.

by Rich on Jul 7, 2011 4:06 pm • linkreport

@Rich:

I agree - if one name is dropped, it should be "Franconia". As an aside, I used to collect business cards (still do, but not as actively), and one of my favorite things about cards from this region is to see who uses what semi-obscure locality name in the address. I've only ever seen one with a "Franconia" address...everything else around there is either "Springfield" or (very occasionally) "Kingstowne".

by Ser Amantio di Nicolao on Jul 7, 2011 4:08 pm • linkreport

@Tina: I hear you loud and agreement.

And yes, North Brentwood is a separate town from Brentwood, as my friends in Mt. Ranier told me when I got lost going to visit them.

by greent on Jul 7, 2011 4:09 pm • linkreport

If the Reagan Airport stop were incorrectly renamed "National Airport," then shouldn't the Dulles Airport stop be named "International Airport"??? Consistency, after all!!! BTW, before someone squawks, I have no problem with adding "RFK" to "Stadium-Armory," especially given that the Metrorail system serves two other notable stadiums.

(One does wonder why the compromise form "Reagan National Airport" that is used on the BGSs on I-395 and by some of the news reporters was unacceptable.)

by Rich on Jul 7, 2011 4:09 pm • linkreport

Ser Amantio di Nicolao: If they adapt icons, then the Dulles architecture is already iconic so that could be the Dulles station and National Airport be an airplane. I would prefer not to see Reagan's mug on the damn map.

by Bob See on Jul 7, 2011 4:10 pm • linkreport

Rich: If the Reagan Airport stop were incorrectly renamed "National Airport

It would be a statement. Like "taxation without representation".

by Bob See on Jul 7, 2011 4:13 pm • linkreport

It would be a statement. Like "taxation without representation". [sic]

Except that the latter is a slogan, whereas "National Airport" is simply incorrect.

by Rich on Jul 7, 2011 4:20 pm • linkreport

No it isn't "incorrect". It's simply abbreviated, like the other stations in this scheme. The full name can go into the smaller case letters.

by Bob See on Jul 7, 2011 4:23 pm • linkreport

Except that the latter is a slogan, whereas "National Airport" is simply incorrect.

It is not incorrect, it is a shortened name. The (republican forced) official name is Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport. So, if Washington DC can be referred to as DC, then National can be National.

I mean, does anyone call BWI anything but BWI?

by greent on Jul 7, 2011 4:25 pm • linkreport

It would be a statement. Like "taxation without representation".

I think Bob See just found the new name for the NoMa neighborhood.

by Adam L on Jul 7, 2011 4:29 pm • linkreport

hardly incorrect. It's National Airport. That other name was forced on us. There's National, there's Dulles, and there's BWI. None of this Marshall or Reagan BS.

by Birdie on Jul 7, 2011 4:33 pm • linkreport

The difference is that in the case of many of the other "shortened names," the shortened names in question are the sole ones used or accurately represent something at that location such that there is nothing unclear (e.g., "Woodley Park," "Archives," "West Falls Church," etc.)--that is, nothing is lost by dropping the other elements from the name in question. The BWI argument is a red herring because, as greent says, almost nobody calls it anything other than "BWI," whereas the same is not true in the case of Reagan Airport, which has at least four common terms used to refer to it (Reagan Airport, Reagan National Airport, National Airport, and DCA). Look, I know some people don't like the "Reagan" on there, but whether you like it or not, it's become a recognized part of the name and leaving it off is potentially confusing to a lot of people new to the area. "National" was never the airport's real name anyway, "Washington" was, but people used "National" in part to distinguish it from other area airports such as Washington-Virginia Airport (which no longer exists).

BTW, it was Bill Clinton who renamed the airport after Reagan and even some of the most partisan Democrats in the Senate at the time voted "yea."

by Rich on Jul 7, 2011 4:35 pm • linkreport

Ideally, WMATA should evaluate all the names, since they have to redo stuff for the new maps. E.g., L'Enfant Plaza should also be named "Air & Space Museum" so that people will go there instead of to the "Smithsonian stop."

Similarly, is there a way to name Cleveland Park subtitled "National Zoo arrival" and Woodley Park subtitled "National Zoo departure" so that people can go to Cleveland Park and walk downhill to the Zoo, and continue downhill to WP when they leave?

by Richard Layman on Jul 7, 2011 4:39 pm • linkreport

Why does it need to be Vienna? Vienna is a relatively small area compared to Fairfax - and the station is mostly located in Fairfax. I'd fine-print Vienna and maybe MetroWest as the development comes together.

by Cory on Jul 7, 2011 4:45 pm • linkreport

Why does it need to be Vienna? Vienna is a relatively small area compared to Fairfax - and the station is mostly located in Fairfax. I'd fine-print Vienna and maybe MetroWest as the development comes together.

I think it's because back when the system was planned in the late 1960s and early 1970s, there was a lot less development and the stop was a lot closer to the Town of Vienna than to the central portion of the City of Fairfax. Of course the Orange Line didn't open out to there until June of 1986 and by that time the area had grown up a lot more, but the name had long been selected by then. I suppose the town limits begin just up the street from the Metro stop, such that the overall station complex (car parks included) is sort of "adjacent" to the town, even if it's not the more commercial part of the town that most people think of as Vienna.

by Rich on Jul 7, 2011 4:54 pm • linkreport

@Rich: National was known as National since it's creation (DCA was rearely used). I've not heard Reagan out of anyone unless they are newer residents in the last 5-8 years (and yeah, I do mean white people).

Yea yea, Bill Clinton signed the leg. and mealymouthed demosmacks voted for it. the Repub Congress forced this through despite the fact that MWAA, DC and VA were actually in agreement opposing it.

Only republicans called it Reagan until Congress forced WMATA to put in on the Metro signs.

I still love listening to pilots who refuse to say it,and instead say "ladies and Gentlemen we are coming into smghfjsk National Airport".

Now landing at Reagan Airport, in Reagan, DC, in the United States or Reagan. Bah. We should name a peace center for GWB, and an reusable energy center for Dick Cheney and a Celibacy Center for Slick Willie Clinton.

by greent on Jul 7, 2011 5:26 pm • linkreport

The station currently referred to as Georgia Avenue/Petworth should instead be called - Petworth/Parkview with Georgia Avenue in the subtitle. Georgia avenue is Not a place, it's a street that traverses many miles.

It's interesting to do focus groups, but would have been more effective to discuss with community groups and ANCs served by the individual stations on the board for potential changes. The adjacent ANCs have already expressed their desire for recognition of ParkView and a desire to underemphasize Georgia Avenue.

Robert H. Mandle
Commissioner 4C10

by Rob mandle on Jul 7, 2011 5:31 pm • linkreport

National was known as National since it's creation (DCA was rearely [sic] used).

I know that. I've lived here since 1974. However, my original point remains: The airport was never named "National Airport." The word "National" was, and remains, an adjective that denotes that the airport receives no international commercial flights due to the lack of a Customs and Immigration facility for such flights. (The commercial flights originating in other countries that land at that airport all come from airports that have Customs and Immigration preclearance, such as Toronto and Bermuda; theoretically, Shannon would be eligible if the perimeter rule weren't in effect. Flights of this sort are legally considered "domestic" flights because the passengers have already legally entered the USA.) Thus, the airport's name was really the simple "Washington Airport," with the word "National" merely denoting the type of airport.

However, people came to use the word "National" to distinguish it from other airports using the name "Washington." The original airport was Hoover Field, located roughly where the Pentagon now stands, and a larger airport called Washington Airport then opened nearby. The owners of the newer airport bought Hoover Field and renamed the combined facility "Washington-Hoover Airport." It was replaced by "Washington National Airport"; there was also an airport located nearby at Bailey's Crossroads, where the Skyline development is now, named "Washington-Virginia Airport." (Trivia: You can still see the runway warning lights on the Burke & Herbert Bank on Seminary Road even though the airport's been gone for about 40 years.) Also, of course, Dulles International Airport was renamed to include the word "Washington" in 1984, supposedly to reduce confusion between "Dulles" and "Dallas" although no doubt marketing reasons factored in as well. Anyway, given the number of airports that used "Washington" somewhere, it's small wonder that people tended to use "National" to distinguish that particular "Washington Airport" from the other ones. That doesn't mean that "National" was ever the actual name of the airport, just that it was a popular one--and it's simply flat-out wrong for someone to insist that it's the only acceptable name given the prevalence of "Reagan National" on news reports, road signs, and the like, such that there are enough people in the area who use that name to make it the best one on something like the Metro map.

I mean, put it this way--someone who's lived in the area a long time and prefers the name "National Airport" isn't the person at whom the Metrorail map is aimed anyway. The map, just like road signs, exists primarily to help the person who is unfamiliar with the system. Those people are, by your own admission, the ones most likely to use "Reagan National" or "Reagan," and I don't see how the color of any of the people involved is in any way relevant to the discussion. (As I said, though, I think "Reagan National Airport" makes more sense on the map than the full name.)

by Rich on Jul 7, 2011 5:45 pm • linkreport

@Rich:
Yea, I know it was Hoover field, in the 1930's. But, according to the Govt, your point may not be correct: it was officially named Washington National Airport until it was changed in 1998:

http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CRPT-105hrpt408/pdf/CRPT-105hrpt408.pdf

http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/BILLS-105s1575enr/pdf/BILLS-105s1575enr.pdf

"I mean, put it this way--someone who's lived in the area a long time and prefers the name "National Airport" isn't the person at whom the Metrorail map is aimed anyway."

Well then, it should be DCA and IAD, as that is what is on their tickets, no?!? Sorry, I admitted no such use of Reagan as you surmise. National Airport is fine for tourists and residents alike. It worked for 40 years, until the republican congress and slick willie decided Reagan was more important than George Washington.

by greent on Jul 7, 2011 6:03 pm • linkreport

greent: National Airport is fine for tourists and residents alike. It worked for 40 years, until the republican congress and slick willie decided Reagan was more important than George Washington.

Exactly. Rich is going off about how it wasn't 'officially' National, yet I highly doubt he had a problem that name on the old maps. It may not have been "official", but it was ours. Seems local flavor has no place any more...

by Bob See on Jul 7, 2011 6:14 pm • linkreport

You haven't disproved my point at all. I said it was "Washington National Airport" until it was renamed. There's nothing in my post that said otherwise. What I said was that the word "National" is an adjective, just like "International" is an adjective in "Washington Dulles International Airport." Thus, "Washington Airport" and "Dulles Airport" were adjectivally modified to indicate that one was a domestic, or "national," airport and one was an international airport.

Sorry, I admitted no such use of Reagan as you surmise.

You made the following statement with an unnecessary race-baiting parenthetical:

"I've not heard Reagan out of anyone unless they are newer residents in the last 5-8 years (and yeah, I do mean white people)."

That sentence states that you perceive the name "Reagan," used in reference to the airport, to be something newcomers to the DC area use. Newcomers to the area are inherently the people less likely to be familiar with the area and in need of a map, such as the Metrorail map, to get around. I think anyone can agree that someone moving here in 2008 is more likely than those of us who have lived here for over 35 years, to need a map, and I don't think it's controversial to say that the map should be designed to be as helpful to those newcomers (and, of course, tourists) as is reasonable. You've recognized the use of the name "Reagan," or "Reagan National," among newcomers, and I therefore quite reasonably used clear logic to assert that those same people, as newcomers, are the ones most likely to need the Metro map. That's part of the reason why I also said that I think it would be reasonable for another stop to be renamed "RFK Stadium-Armory" (and, by extension, for there to be something indicating that the Nationals' ballpark is at Navy Yard, although I'd rather not see a ballpark name added to the stop in case they ever sell the naming rights...maybe "Navy Yard/Baseball Stadium"???).

I find it amusing that you feel the need to make insulting and snide comments about the whole thing instead of just debating it rationally, but regardless of the tenor of debate this argument is getting really pointless since they're not going to change the name of that stop. (I believe in fact they can't legally change it.) As I said before, I think "Reagan National Airport" would make more sense as the name of the stop, especially because anyone who doesn't already know that he's in the Washington area has FAR greater problems than needing to figure out a subway map!

Got to sign off to pick up my wife at the Metrorail (but NOT at the airport stop ), so I suppose you get the last word if you're inclined to take it.

by Rich on Jul 7, 2011 6:17 pm • linkreport

Maybe we should change Woodley Park/Zoo to Elephant and Castle...what with the two grand hotels and the National Zoo.

And find someplace out there for a New Lots stop. Someplace in a neighborhood that's a bit run down.

Both names seem to work well in other venues.

by Mike S. on Jul 7, 2011 6:44 pm • linkreport

+1 to those advocating for "Petworth" (or "Petworth / Park View") as the primary name of that stop.

by Tim H on Jul 7, 2011 8:15 pm • linkreport

Enough with the complaints about Reagan National's name. A big part of the reason the station names need to be shortened is that people feel the need to use them to make statements. Saying that half the airport's name should be omitted from the nearest transit stop because the city generally didn't like Reagan is just as silly as saying "African-American Civil War Memorial" needs to be part of a station name because a majority of the city's African-American. If you don't like the airport's name, lobby Congress to change it; Metro stations' names need to be as informative as reasonably possible.

Besides, airports are major stations and don't need subtitles, so longer names aren't as much of a problem there. "Dulles International Airport," "Reagan National Airport," and eventually "BWI Marshall Airport" all work just fine.

by jakeod on Jul 7, 2011 8:33 pm • linkreport

I live in the "Franconia" ZIP code and only use Alexandria. Only the county uses "Franconia" as in the Franconia Government Center and Franconia Police District and Station. Both buildings are on Franconia Rd. Other than those, I have never seen or heard Franconia used in reference to this area. Therefore, we always refer to the Springfield Metro station.

by Chuck Coleman on Jul 7, 2011 9:01 pm • linkreport

@ Distantantennas: Love your attitude towards taking the ax to the names, but you might be overly aggressive in a few places.

Thanks. The shorter the better. Station names are not local descriptions. They are station names.

Mt. Vernon Square is a legit neighborhood.

I am not denying that, but the station is at the convention center. Which in itself is plenty to describe where the station is.

National Mall for Smithsonian might be too general, but that's always been a problem with that station, so whatever.

It's the only station with an actual exit on the Mall. It was my first view of the Mall ever. It is for many tourists. It's an experience few will forget. Tourists may not know what the Smithsonian is. All of them know what the Mall is. And it sure as hell is better than Smithsonian-USDA/DOE-Jefferson Dr. Actually, Jefferson might be good name too, although that could confuse people with thinking it's at Tom's anti-dance Memorial.

Dropping 'Square' off the names of things that actually are Squares (Judiciary, McPherson) probably is too much.

I disagree. The word square does not add information. Plus you end up with stations named after people more, in stead of squares. I like that idea. There's no need to honor the square.

Having an unqualified "Farragut" while also having a qualified "Farragut West" seems inconsistent.

Both should be one station. Build the tunnel NPS!

I agree with others who are against using 'marketing names' on stations.

Yep. It should never be Verizon Center. Galleries Place is better. I have no problem with adding the logo of the playing teams to the stop as a visual reminder. This could be done at the universities as well.

There still is a Stadium at Stadium-Armory, and indeed originally was just called 'Stadium'.

Which is confusing because we have many of those. Add a United logo if you want.

Why not make West Hyattsville into Mt. Rainer, since both West Hyattsville and PG Plaza are in Hyattsville?

I'll leave that to the locals. I don't like cardinal directions, unless there really is no escape (Fall Church). PG Plaza is just a terrible name, because it's not at the central plaza of PG county.

@ LuvDusty:Get ready for NARL (North Arlington), GTown, FriHi and much much more folks!

Yeah, and the dreaded DMV that Hot 99.5 seems to be pushing. Shrug. Shiver.

@ HogWash:The station itself is connected (by a walkway) to PG Plaza Mall. Like Pentagon City.

I don't like naming stations after Malls that might disappear. That's why I prefer Tysons Malls over Tysons I&II. The Malls won't go, and are the destination. Whether they'll be named I&II in 20 years, who knows?

@ Mike O:I just don't understand the insistence of Jasper and others to try and get rid of Springfield from Franconia/Springfield.

The stop is in Franconia, not in Springfield. This is not changed by the fact that a commercial developer named its mall after an adjacent neighborhood.

Also, there is no need to have a double name if one suffices.

@ Mike H: Changing King Street to Alexandria makes no sense. Braddock Rd, Eisenhower & Van Dorn are also in Alexandria

I know. I don't like the names of those either. Braddock Rd oddly misnames after a road that ends there. Van Dorn St is also in Eisenhower Ave, not at Van Dorn. The Van Dorn Station is actually a shared station with Fairfax, despite the fact that it has no access to Fairfax County.

@ Rich:Even the real estate agents don't use it as often any more--they tend to use "Springfield" or "Kingstowne" because they believe those names have more allure.

So, now we put real estate agents in charge of renaming neighborhoods? Great idea :-S

by Jasper on Jul 7, 2011 9:17 pm • linkreport

@Dave Murphy: Eisenhower Ave = Carlyle. Go with one or the other, not both. Likewise, rename King St as Old Town or just leave it as is. Heck, pretty much everyone knows that you get off at King St to go to Old Town anyway. Agree with others that this shouldn't be just "Alexandria" as Jasper suggests...not when Old Town is well established and there are 3 other Metro stations within the city.

@Ser Amantio: I realize you mentioned this partially in jest, but why on Earth would we need a hyphenated station name here in Huntington?

by Froggie on Jul 7, 2011 9:21 pm • linkreport

Come on, nobody calls it "CoHe" (I assume pronounced Co-High, right?), do they? I've only heard it as a joke between friends.

Nobody? Speak for yourself. Several people I know use the CoHe abb. both in writing/emails/txts and in everyday conversation. And it's pronounced "Co-He", not "Co-High". I know it doesn't make sense, but that's what's happening.

Ask a group of CoHe residents under 25...and you'll see.

And I still don't see why NoMa is not an appropriate abb. for that part of the city. It is, correctly, North of Mass Ave. I think it's a great and easy descriptor for a quickly developing area of the city that really isn't Shaw or Logan or Chinatown.

by LuvDusty on Jul 7, 2011 9:54 pm • linkreport

The name Golden Triangle always reminds me of some kind of Columbian drug dealer hangout.

by Anon on Jul 7, 2011 9:56 pm • linkreport

I too can't stand the icons. In 1970, one quarter of Mexicans were fully illiterate, which is not the same as the functional illiteracy that affects approximately one-third of Washington's current population. The distinction is a relevant one that Wyman seems not to grasp.

I also note that as a resident of Alexandria who lives right by the King Street station, if the designation were to change I'd prefer:

King Street
Old Town Alexandria

It seems to be the most appropriate way to show it.

by Craig on Jul 7, 2011 10:06 pm • linkreport

@LuvDusty, it's as commenters above have noted: almost half the district is north of Massachusetts Ave. There's no more or less reason to give the appellation NoMA to that section of DC than there would be to pin it on AU Park, McLean Gardens, Sheridan-Kalorama, or several partial neighborhoods that border Mass Ave.

by Craig on Jul 7, 2011 10:18 pm • linkreport

Yeah, I've never heard CoHe either, and I live there.

Also, it's Georgetown University Law Center, not Georgetown University Law School. They're picky about which words you use.

by jsl on Jul 7, 2011 10:34 pm • linkreport

Cordozo is still the only high school to be on a station name. And it's still in the bold name.

by Tom Coumaris on Jul 8, 2011 12:18 am • linkreport

NoMa and CoHi are different animals. CoHi, like SoHo is a largely organic name used by residents. SoHo got formalized after years of use. Maybe CoHi will; I've never met anyone who uses it.

NoMa was a transparent attempt by developers to name their neighborhood, which has no character. Fine, but nothing about The Area Currently Known as NoMa is as cool as SoHo was when Philip Glass was chilling with Chuck Close on the floor of a cast-iron loft the floor above a doorknob factory.

by Neil Flanagan on Jul 8, 2011 1:15 am • linkreport

@LuvDusty, it's as commenters above have noted: almost half the district is north of Massachusetts Ave. There's no more or less reason to give the appellation NoMA to that section of DC than there would be to pin it on AU Park, McLean Gardens, Sheridan-Kalorama, or several partial neighborhoods that border Mass Ave.

Craig, I read those previous posts. But that's still an argument that doesn't make sense to me.

I used SoHo in NY as an example to refute the posters who have said that NoMa is a bad abb. because there are lots of things/neighborhoods North of Mass.

Well, there are lots of things/neighborhoods South of Houston (SoHo)in NYC and that didn't stop SoHo from becoming an established abb.

So my point about NoMa is that if it catches on, we'll be using it, and I don't see it as any less specific of an abb. than SoHo. And yes, I recognize the "history" of SoHo vs. NoMa, but that's cause NoMa is new...duh! Let's talk in 50 years and see if NoMa has stuck or not and who knows what amazing events or people may end up living there and making history.

My bigger point, which nobody seemed to catch, is that young people are more and more into shortened speech and writing. So my hunch is that abbs. like NoMa, CoHe and many others will become common usage very very very soon if they haven't already.

Like it or not.

by LuvDusty on Jul 8, 2011 8:39 am • linkreport

To Craig's point: I think the reason for NoMa is that it's the only part of DC's high-density central business district that's north of Mass Ave.

Generally, Mass Ave is the dividing line between downtown and not downtown; the Downtown BID, for instance, uses Mass Ave as its northern border along all but one block.

So while Spring Valley is also north of Mass Ave, NoMa is the place where downtown crosses north of Mass Ave.

by David Alpert on Jul 8, 2011 8:45 am • linkreport

1. Let's keep the vowels - it is English.

2. I don't think the icons are a good idea. They're too cuties for this map and would clutter it up needlessly. I've always appreciated its clean look.

3. NoMa, in my opinion, is a developer & real estate agent name and does not really speak to the hearitage or feel of the area. Well, at least no to me.

4. What about Stadium-Armory. Aren't there major plans for redevelopement of the area? If the stadium is razed, would it then just be Armory?

by John @ RI Ave Stn on Jul 8, 2011 9:36 am • linkreport

+1 to those advocating for "Petworth" as the primary name of that stop. I agree, Petworth is much better than just a street name "Georgia Avenue".

I wish my station was named something like "Edgewood-Brentwood" instend of "Rhode Island Avenue-Brentwood". It would be more aptly named "Home Depot Station" then RI Ave (that was a joke).

by John @ RI Ave Stn on Jul 8, 2011 9:49 am • linkreport

Good idea for the ICONS to include one of Ronald Reagan. Immensely admired and familiar to most Americans, Europeans, Asians etc. who will be visiting. (Yes, some soreheads still want to replay the 1980 and 1984 elections here...but I thought this was about what's good for Greater DC and METRO. The system needs some 'new thinking' and most of the shortened names are terrific. They make a lot more sense. Notice the new train cars will be blue and gray with ample new lighting and flat screens. These will be welcomed improvements.

by Pelham1861 on Jul 8, 2011 11:09 am • linkreport

Thank goodness they're finally dropping "Waterfront-Southeastern University" Given that "Southeastern University" ceased to exist two years ago!

by Sara on Jul 8, 2011 11:49 am • linkreport

Count me as one more vote towards dropping "Georgia Ave" from Georgia Ave/Petworth. The first choice in any station name should be the neighborhood name, not a street that crosses multiple neighborhoods and cities and is therefore meaningless as a location. Petworth-Park View would be ideal as the metro stop is on the boundary between the 2 neighborhoods. Georgia Ave isn't needed at all...just skip the subtitle.

by Susan on Jul 8, 2011 12:09 pm • linkreport

The name Golden Triangle always reminds me of some kind of Columbian drug dealer hangout.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Triangle_(Southeast_Asia)

by oboe on Jul 8, 2011 12:18 pm • linkreport

I agree with Dan Reed that calling the Rhode Island - Brentwood station simply "Brentwood" would be confusing. Brentwood MD is within a mile of the West Hyattsville stop, and many people walk or bike to the West Hyattsville from Brentwood. In fact if they're thinking of adding Mount Rainier to West Hyattsville's name, Brentwood is nearly the same distance from the stop.

by Bwood resident on Jul 8, 2011 12:52 pm • linkreport

Golden Triangle is also a Thai fried tofu appetizer.

I feel that Metro staff have adopted a "baby steps" mode which, in this highly politically charged region, is the safest way to move forward. It's very easy to get the Metro board and/or the public all riled up and upset over what might seem like the smallest thing. This approach will more likely lead to many successes in righting a lot of the madness that has plagued the Metro system for 20 years or more.

by MDE on Jul 8, 2011 2:05 pm • linkreport

So... in an attempt to shorten names, what we're gonna end up is shorter names with even longer fine print under them. Not U St, but U Street/Cardozo (African-Amer Civil War Memorial). Not Rhode Island Ave, but Rhode Island Avenue (Brentwood, DC). I guess I should have known that fine print is loved in a city of lawyers.

by Jasper on Jul 8, 2011 2:09 pm • linkreport

I've never heard anyone shorten the station name to "Georgia Avenue" but plenty of people shorten it to "Petworth." I will also vote for Petworth-Park View as a nice new name.
"Cardozo" may not be as much in use today, but maybe changing to station to simply "Cardozo" would revive it. People would get used to it soon enough.

by djdc on Jul 8, 2011 2:35 pm • linkreport

I don't like the NoMa name precisely because it seems like a marketing person's ripoff of "Soho" in NYC. "Soho" is at least a name that has been around for a long time, plus it rolls of the tong very easily. NoMa is neither of those things.

Both the San Diego and Lisbon, Portugal transit systems use logos and names to "brand" their lines. So you have the Blue Line but you also have the line with the ocean wave symbol in San Diego or the "Seagull" line in Lisbon.

If you really want something uniquely Washington, maybe lines named after presidents? So the Blue Line could be the George Washington line, etc? Though that might get too controversial (i.e. do you name the Blue or Yellow line the Reagan line since they goes past Reagan Airport?)

http://www.sdmts.com/trolley/trolley.asp
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lisbon_Metro

by Marc on Jul 8, 2011 3:49 pm • linkreport


"Convention Center" makes more sense for the primary name of that station than "Mt Vernon Sq". No one goes to Mt Vernon Square as a destination, and I've encountered multiple tourists who come up the escalator at that station wondering where George Washington's house is.

The college names only add clutter and serve no useful purpose (other than free publicity for the schools). Everyone headed to a college knows where it is -- most of them took exams, wrote essays, and paid thousands in deposits before they even arrived in town.

Focus on keeping it simple and sensible for visitors.

I like the idea of naming the lines after presidents. If you take the first six, four of them came to DC from Virginia, and the other two came from a state starting with "Ma" and went right back:
Yellow Line: Washington
Blue Line: Jefferson
Orange Line: Monroe
Silver Line: Madison
Red Line: Adams
Green Line: Quincy
New lines could then be added in order (if Purple happens it would be Jackson, then Van Buren, ...)

by Novanglus on Jul 11, 2011 12:32 pm • linkreport

I like the idea of naming the lines after Presidents.

by LuvDusty on Jul 11, 2011 3:58 pm • linkreport

My thoughts:

U St
Georgia Ave
Convention Center
Stadium
Waterfront
National Mall
Gallery Place
Brentwood
Brookland
NoMa
Woodley Park
Clevland Park
...

In general, ditch ALL university names--if a University wants advertisement and noteriety they can do it with ads on the trains and buses. No subtitles. I think it's fine to list the intersection or other major locations near a station on the map, but not in such a manner that people continue using the ungodly long names. Instruct operators as to the correct station name and ensure consistancy until such time as automated station announcements are in place throughout all rail cars. DO NOT--LET ME REPEAT--DO NOT PUT NAMES OF TEAMS OR OTHER COMMERCIAL ENTITIES, OR ANY LOGO, IMAGE, OR UNPRONOUNCABLE SYMBOL IN A STATION NAME!!! That means no effing curley w - BAD idea that opens a pandoras box for a ton of future bad ideas!!! Finally, with regard to silver line station names, let's be a little more creative WMATA, there should never be a two stations with any part of their name in common (i.e. only one station name should have Tysons except if they decide to do a Tysons North, Tysons South type of thing like the Farragut stations); and actually even the Farragut stations should probably be renamed if they're not going to be connected in the future.

by Matthew S. on Jul 13, 2011 2:21 pm • linkreport

What Matthew just said.

And I see NoMa is winning ground as it should, for a clear station name..to the point, accurate and easy to remember.

by LuvDusty on Jul 13, 2011 3:19 pm • linkreport

I'd love to see West Hyattsville Station add a -Mount Rainier next to it. The Gateway Arts District as a whole is not close enough to PG Plaza or West Hyattsville, but the Mount Rainier circle, Brentwood, North Brentwood, and Hyattsville would all benefit greatly from Mt. Rainier's name being proposed as its circle is the spot everyone remembers most who come up/down Rhode Island ave.

by Justin on Aug 5, 2011 11:40 am • linkreport

All stations should be named with unique four-character alphanumeric abbreviations, like airport abbreviations, but one character longer - plus a short, simple name, generally reflecting a neighbrhood or nearby location (not an organizational name, which could move).

For example:

MTRO - Metro Center
SMSN - Smithsonian
FDTR - Federal Triangle
LFNT - L'Enfant
FCSW - Federal Center SW
14NI - McPherson Square
FANO - Farragut North
FAWE - Farragut West
FOBO - Foggy Bottom
CASO - Capitol South
EAMA - Eastern Market
and so on...

Drop the free advertising for ephemeral local attractions like sports venues and educational institutions...let them pay for the publicity.

by citizenw on Sep 14, 2011 3:57 pm • linkreport

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