Greater Greater Washington

Weekend video: How bike shops encourage bicycling

Many factors affect whether people bicycle, from access to bikes, to topography, to bike lanes, to parking and showers at work. One other important yet less often discussed factor is access to bike shops.

In this video, Milwaukee's Keith Holt discusses how bike shops, especially in low-income communities and communities of color, can help children and adults start bicycling and then make it a regular activity.

Support us: Monthly   Yearly   One time
Greatest supporter—$250/year
Greater supporter—$100/year
Great supporter—$50/year
Or pick your own amount: $/year
Greatest supporter—$250
Greater supporter—$100
Great supporter—$50
Supporter—$20
Or pick your own amount: $
Want to contribute by mail or another way? Instructions are here.
Contributions to Greater Greater Washington are not tax deductible.

David Alpert is the founder and editor-in-chief of Greater Greater Washington. He worked as a Product Manager for Google for six years and has lived in the Boston, San Francisco, and New York metro areas in addition to Washington, DC. He now lives with his wife and daughter in Dupont Circle. 

Comments

Add a comment »

Holt specifically says that low income and communities of color are not the same thing. So, why do bike shops in colored communities promote biking more than in non colored communities?

This video is too damn disjointed.

That being said, more bike stores promote cycling in ANY community, regardless of economic or ethnic makeup.

by TGEOA on Jul 31, 2011 2:13 pm • linkreport

And by including "bike shops" in the headline, what should also come to mind are public bicycle workshops that provide access to tools, technical advice, transportation planning, and other resources...right?

by Critical Chris on Jul 31, 2011 3:01 pm • linkreport

@Chris

When will Metro provide classes and tools so riders can fix the escalators?

by TGEOA on Jul 31, 2011 5:19 pm • linkreport

@chris

Bike shops should provide the services you list. Good ones do anyhow. It's in their interest.

by Erik on Jul 31, 2011 9:18 pm • linkreport

@Erik

Not too many shops provide tools or work areas. Some offer classes, but for real education adult education classes are the better option.

by TGEOA on Jul 31, 2011 9:49 pm • linkreport

@TGEOA, this is a service which we at BicycleSPACE provide. We'll teach you whatever you'd like to know each Tuesday at 7.15, free. Admittedly that's rare, but I can't say I understand why. More people working on bikes = better bike culture, and that's good for all of us.

by Erik on Jul 31, 2011 9:59 pm • linkreport

@Erik

Good on you and the rest of the BS crew. Most of the local LBS shops charge way too much for service or intimidate buyers that don't want to spend 2k for a new bike.

Way too many people are turned off of cycling because they think they have to drop a lot of cash, when in fact if you do it old school you can do it on the cheap.

by TGEOA on Jul 31, 2011 10:47 pm • linkreport

@TGEOA, I think it's important to keep the old bikes running. What kind of culture are we creating if it's only brand new bikes? What's that say about us?

For cycling to really take root there needs to be a certain charm, history, empowerment. We're always happy to see older bikes in operation. A robust bike culture should include old, new, DIY, and everything in-between.

For those who can't afford or don't want to have their bike fixed we're happy to teach them how to do it because we believe in bikes as a solution to many problems we face as a society.

by Erik on Jul 31, 2011 11:01 pm • linkreport

Thanks for posting this! It brings up a lot of important issues that are usually overlooked by bike advocates. If bike advocates can partner with equity advocates and highlight the obvious common interests, perhaps we can change the negative perceptions associated with biking.

by Lou on Aug 1, 2011 9:09 am • linkreport

Add a Comment

Name: (will be displayed on the comments page)

Email: (must be your real address, but will be kept private)

URL: (optional, will be displayed)

Your comment:

By submitting a comment, you agree to abide by our comment policy.
Notify me of followup comments via email. (You can also subscribe without commenting.)
Save my name and email address on this computer so I don't have to enter it next time, and so I don't have to answer the anti-spam map challenge question in the future.

or