Greater Greater Washington

Breakfast links: Emancipation


Photo by Travelin' Librarian on Flickr.
A competitive general?: The November election in DC is often a forgone conclusion with Democrats cruising to victory, but might that not be the case this year with many dissatisfied voters? (Examiner)

Many reasons: Reason TV blames Metro's escalator troubles on in-sourcing maintenance 20 years ago that stifled competition. But they forget that the escalators are now 20 years older, difficult to maintain, and Metro still uses some contractors. (Post)

Conflicts go online: Maryland elected officials may soon be posting their conflict of interest statements online. This would modernize access in a state that watchdogs claim lacks transparency. (Gazette)

Bike bits: The Anacostia Riverwalk bridge over the CSX tracks will open next week. (TheWashCycle) ... A driver assaulted a bicyclist in Manassas. (Inside NOVA) ... Valets, the bike lane is not the place for signs. (TheWashCycle) ... Ask Fairfax to restore the bicycle program, which it cut last year. (WABA)

Taxes broken less often: In 2011, the District handed out fewer tax breaks to individual developments, perhaps because of new rules that demand more justification. (DCFPI)

Along the Purple Line: 6 businesses in Riverdale Park won't have to close to make room for the Purple Line. (Patch) ... But will the line affect some schools? (Capital News Service) ... A Bethesda development satisfied the Planning Board with the space it's leaving for an on-street Capital Crescent Trail. (DCmud)

Before the Old Post Office was old: Now the Old Post Office Building is slated to become a hotel, but its future was not always so certain. A post office for 15 years, the building became a target for multiple plans to tear it down. (Streets of Washington)

Bikeshare goes Hollywood: LA will get a privately funded bikeshare system with 4,000 bikes over 400 stations. The stations will concentrate in 4 neighborhoods: downtown, Hollywood, Venice Beach and Westwood. (Atlantic Cities)

Did sidewalks add to Trayvon tragedy?: The design of Sanford, Florida, makes anyone who is walking seem like a suspicious character. With good sidewalks and places to walk, there might have been "eyes on the street" that would have prevented Trayvon Martin's death. (Boston Globe, Ben Ross)

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Steven Yates grew up in Indiana before moving to DC in 2002 to attend college at American University. He currently lives in Southwest DC.  

Comments

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Frankly, the thought of urbanism and neighborhood design playing a role in the incident with Trayvon Martin makes me sick and it appears Youngerman is just using the attention for his agenda. Although I don't entirely disagree with ideas for better neighborhood design, this doesn't seem to be the right case to use it on. It is a townhome neighborhood with nature features being the centerpieces. From a neighborhood design standpoint, it may have been nice if sidewalks continued through all driveways, but the those were passed over for paths that go through open areas (the desired shared space in the editorial) or around water (that is also why driveways face roads instead of alleys). Also, the multiple 911 calls act as some sort of proof that there were "eyes on the streets" or paths (shared space) in this instance. I also don't see where the "sidewalk ends twice and becomes a no-man’s-land of grassy highway shoulder." Of course areas outside of the neighborhood are completely irrelevant in this case and are another reason I'm uncomfortable with the linkage.

by selxic on Apr 16, 2012 9:19 am • linkreport

I think you mean CSX, not CXX...

by Mark P. on Apr 16, 2012 9:35 am • linkreport

"Not a foregone conclusion", sourced from The Examiner. C'mon, it must be a very slow news day.

by Rich on Apr 16, 2012 9:37 am • linkreport

Without commenting specifically on the Zimmerman case it is important to highlight how design can hamper/hinder crime. There is mounds of evidence, broken windows theory, the debates we have here about security of federal buildings, Jane Jacobs talks about how the garden city courtyard designs hamper police because criminals have a lot more entry and exit points (watch the first season of the wire where they hang out in the courtyard for an albeit fictional example). Would better neighborhood design prevented the tragedy? That's impossible to say but its not something that should be dismissed.

by Canaan on Apr 16, 2012 9:52 am • linkreport

never ceases to amaze me how we as Americans can use these court cases that pop up (Rodney King, OJ, Duke Lacrosse, and now this) as a proxy for talking about race and then how we try to hang everything in the kitchen cupboard on them

by charlie on Apr 16, 2012 10:01 am • linkreport

@charlie

Oh, come on. The fact that this Martin/Zimmerman case happened to involve vigilantism in a gated community isn't relevant to how we build our cities?

by Alex B. on Apr 16, 2012 10:07 am • linkreport

Is Ben Ross next to Boston Globe because he submitted the link? I had been meaning to ask that before and only noticed today because I thought I cited the wrong name in my post.

by selxic on Apr 16, 2012 10:09 am • linkreport

I'm surprised and somewhat disappointed that The Examiner's wishful thinking about defeating DC Democrats made it into the links.

by Ward 1 Guy on Apr 16, 2012 10:14 am • linkreport

@AlexB; sanford, Fl is a city? Looked very very sub-urban to me.

by charlie on Apr 16, 2012 10:16 am • linkreport

George Zimmerman is an example of how "eyes on the street" can go too far. (Eyes and prejudice and guns)

by Ward 1 Guy on Apr 16, 2012 10:17 am • linkreport

I grew up in Seminole County (where Sanford is located). Despite its rich history, the vast majority of the area's development and population are of a much more recent vintage, coming with the post-Disney growth of central Florida as a tourist destination. Like many areas communities built up in that era, it's a heavily car-dependent area. (Although over the last decade, there has been considerable expansion of sidewalks, trails, and buses, they're still marginal parts of the transportation mode-share in most parts of the area.)

I can't speak to the particular neighborhood, but there is definitely a sense of suspicion about people walking in much of the area: especially if they are young, and especially if they are black or Latino. I think that context is very relevant in understanding the case.

by Gavin on Apr 16, 2012 10:19 am • linkreport

@Charlie

sanford, Fl is a city? Looked very very sub-urban to me.

Irrelevant arguing of semantics. Suburbs are part of cities, you realize.

by Alex B. on Apr 16, 2012 10:29 am • linkreport

@Alex B.; no, they are sub-urban. Looking it up on wiki, the density is well below that of Fairfax County. At best you might say it is a "small town"

by charlie on Apr 16, 2012 10:34 am • linkreport

Charlie,

Density is not the same as design. There are suburban areas in DC and Urban areas in fairfax.

by Canaan on Apr 16, 2012 10:48 am • linkreport

@charlie
"City" is not a technical term. Suburbs are part of what could be called the greater extent of a city. Is it a center city? Or a dense urban center? No. But it can still be part of a "city."

Miriam-Webster: City: an inhabited place of greater size, population, or importance than a town or village

I wouldn't call it a "small town" since it has 50,000 people and is part of a bigger metro area.

by MLD on Apr 16, 2012 10:50 am • linkreport

WOW! Talking about jaw-dropping ridiculousness. I think it's rather insulting to use the death of a teen as some sort of silly justification as to why we need better street designs.

Flawed street design had NOTHING to do with Trayvon's death. The fact that grown man saw a child walking in a n'hood he was SUPPOSED to be in and decided to confront him is what caused his death.

Man + "suspicion" + firing loaded gun = death.

Come on GGW, out of all the stories on Trayvon you could have posted, you decided to minimize his death by discussing "street design?" This must be a delayed April Fool's entry.

On this one I can admit, I'm shocked.

by HogWash on Apr 16, 2012 11:16 am • linkreport

@HogWash

How does this discussion minimize Martin's death?

The whole point of the discussion is that Martin's behavior wouldn't have seemed suspicious at all (regardless of Zimmerman's motivations) in a different setting. As Gavin mentioned, context matters.

I don't think this is about street design per se, but more about the idea of a gated community. And, for what it's worth, this is a line of discussion that started well before Martin's death.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0815710038?ie=UTF8&tag=washpost-opinions-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=1789&creativeASIN=0815710038

by Alex B. on Apr 16, 2012 12:09 pm • linkreport

@Rich

Actually, it was a slow news day. But the editorial by Jonetta Rose Barras (who isn't your sterotypical Examiner columnist) isn't just "Republicans will do well." In fact, she said that progressives might have a shot unseating Michael Brown from his at-large seat. Now do I think any of those upsets will happen? Not really, and I find her claim that Ward 8 is still up for grabs to be particurally dubious.

by Steven Yates on Apr 16, 2012 12:09 pm • linkreport

@selxic

Yes, Ben Ross submitted that one. When you submit a link (using the link at the bottom of all link posts) there is a field where you can put how you would like to be credited. You are even free to leave the field blank if you wish to remain anonymous.

by Steven Yates on Apr 16, 2012 12:17 pm • linkreport

Thanks for the response, Steven Yates. His name is often next to the source (I don't recall the last time I saw anyone else) and I always forget to ask.

by selxic on Apr 16, 2012 12:53 pm • linkreport

The whole point of the discussion is that Martin's behavior wouldn't have seemed suspicious at all (regardless of Zimmerman's motivations) in a different setting. As Gavin mentioned, context matters.

Well sure. That's if you're willing to believe that had Trayvon been a white 17yr old, Zimmerman would have been just as suspicious as the "setting" the silly author suggests contributed to Martin's death. I'm not willing to believe it and suggest that "race" had much more to do with the suspicion than a poorly planned streetscape. Gavin alludes to that in his post.

This silly discussion is no different than me writing an article asking the question, "Did Angela's skimpy outfit contribute to her rape." I mean really, for what purpose does that serve other than to make my point about women needing to be fully-clothed like the Amish.

by HogWash on Apr 16, 2012 1:03 pm • linkreport

Burkas, HogWash. Amish clothing is way too suggestive.

by selxic on Apr 16, 2012 1:14 pm • linkreport

hogwash

Do you really think what happened to Martin could have happened, in, say, Clarendon? If not, is that only a function of the ideologies of people who live in Clarendon?

Its quite possible that race AND urban design played a role, and that they interacted.

I like to walk (you may have gathered) I do NOT like to walk by myself, on suburban residential streets in the evening, despites their sometimes lovely appearance. I think the folks with their suburban mindset may think I'm up to no good. Now when I walk with my wife, thats different. Does that mean its only a question of gender? Or also urban design?

I can well imagine that in a place where everyone is white, where there is racialist thinking, AND where no one walks, seeing someone walking is suspicious, and seeing a young black male walking is more so.

The discourse since the shooting has covered the aspects relating to being a young black male, as it should. Is it wrong to ALSO discuss the urban design angle? If so, I am not sure why.

by AWalkerInTheCity on Apr 16, 2012 1:52 pm • linkreport

HW and SE

I am confused - would blaming city authorities who fail to light an area for a rape be equivalent to "blaming the victim"?

by AWalkerInTheCity on Apr 16, 2012 1:54 pm • linkreport

Do you really think what happened to Martin could have happened, in, say, Clarendon?

No I don't. I also don't think it relates to the ideology of the people who live there. Idiots are found in every city. Zimmerman happens to be one who decided to profile and persue. I think the stand your ground law contributed to this moreso than anything else. I don't think Zimmerman had a "suburban" mindset...just ignorant.

Moreover, the write-up here suggests that had there been a better sidewalk design, Trayvon might be alive because there would've been "eyes on the street" which seems like very odd logic.

Is it wrong to ALSO discuss the urban design angle?

Yes I think it is because it marginalizes this teenager's death. This "design" argument would be better supported had Trayvon been killed crossing the street or something similar. Here, he was walking on a sidewalk so I don't get what "better" design could've changed the outcome of some lunatics actions. According to the timeline, Zimmerman initially made the call to police @7:11 claiming to have seen a suspicious male lurking around the clubhouse, walking in the rain w/a hoodie (go figure) by 7:17, Martin had been shot. I don't get how better design could have altered those events.

I am confused - would blaming city authorities who fail to light an area for a rape be equivalent to "blaming the victim

I don't think city officials should be blamed for Trayvon's death at all. Zimmerman should. If a rape happened at the "original spot" city officials shouldn't be blamed for that either.

by HogWash on Apr 16, 2012 3:08 pm • linkreport

"I don't think city officials should be blamed for Trayvon's death at all. Zimmerman should. If a rape happened at the "original spot" city officials shouldn't be blamed for that either."

well I know if a rape happened in my community in a place that was poorly lit, I would want to discuss lighting conditions, and doing so would not mean I was blaming the victim, nor would it excuse the perpetrator. Similarly, I think conditions that discourage walking, and make ANY walker look suspicious, are worth mentioning when someone is killed by someone who claimed he looked suspicious because he was walking around.

You may beleve this could have happened in a more pedestrian friendly place in florida due to the law, and thats fair. I think the "skimpy outfit" thing has nothing to do with this, as thats blaming the victim, and no one in blaming Treyvon Martin for the state of the community.

by AWalkerInTheCity on Apr 16, 2012 3:15 pm • linkreport

I think this could have happened at those townhomes near Rosslyn if Zimmerman had moved east on 66 to Arlington from Manassas instead of down to Florida.

by selxic on Apr 16, 2012 3:29 pm • linkreport


View Larger Map

by HogWash on Apr 16, 2012 3:38 pm • linkreport


View Larger Map

by HogWash on Apr 16, 2012 3:39 pm • linkreport

@Hogwash,

In the medical field and how airplanes are built, people study how bad design contributes to how will-intentioned people make mistakes that cause lives to be lost. Seeing someone walking out in the exurbs is out of the ordinary. I usually think "that poor guy's car broke down" and have to avoid the temptation to pull over to offer him a ride. Otoh I would never think something is amiss when I see someone walking in DC.

I doubt that Zimmerman was well-intentioned. However, poor Trayvon's death is an opportunity to explore how suburban design affects how a resident or a passing driver sizes up a stranger walking around. I am sure that there have been similar situations in which an innocent person walking along in a development (not normal behavior in Florida) causes a well-intentioned bystander to call the cops, who then come by and hassle and/or arrest him for very little reason. How much is the traffic-sewer suburban street design responsible for this sort of needless conflict?

by goldfish on Apr 16, 2012 3:46 pm • linkreport

well I know if a rape happened in my community in a place that was poorly lit,

But where are you getting this information from that it was poorly lit? He was standing in front of the clubhouse.

I just you are stretching reason to argue that the "conditions" made Martin look suspicious. The conditions didn't make Zimmerman believe that Martin looked like he was on drugs and up to no good. Sorry folks but "conditions" didn't have anything to do w/Zimmerman's suspicion. This is one instance where the urban planners have no platform on which to argue.

I think the "skimpy outfit" thing has nothing to do with this, as thats blaming the victim, and no one in blaming Treyvon Martin for the state of the community.

You're right. It was a bad analogy. I should have at least posited "Gap, Inc. should be blamed for contributing to Angela's rape since they manufactured the suggestive clothes she wore"

by HogWash on Apr 16, 2012 3:47 pm • linkreport

BTW, I know that people love to think that (thanks to poor design) everyone in the south drives. But it's not true. Despite how many want to make Trayvon "walking" as an anomaly, I highly doubt that it was..especially when a school is directly across the street from the development.

by HogWash on Apr 16, 2012 3:50 pm • linkreport

hogwash

I was not suggesting that the area where trevor martin was shot was badly lit, I was trying to bring up a rape analogy that was more parallel than the clothing analogy which has nothing to do with this matter, for reasons that should be obvious.

Also, what people do or don't do elsewhere in the south is not necessarily applicable to the more autocentric cities of Florida.

by AWalkerInTheCity on Apr 16, 2012 4:17 pm • linkreport

However, poor Trayvon's death is an opportunity to explore how suburban design affects how a resident or a passing driver sizes up a stranger walking around.

Considering what we do know, urban design does not seem to have played any role in Zimmerman's "suspicion" no more than the multiple other times he called the cops.

I am sure that there have been similar situations in which an innocent person walking along in a development (not normal behavior in Florida) causes a well-intentioned bystander to call the cops

So Floridians don't believe in exercising, take the dog for a walk, a child for a bike ride? I think we've gone way overboard to suggest that people in that community didn't walk at all so Trayvon must be an anomaly.

Also, what people do or don't do elsewhere in the south is not necessarily applicable to the more autocentric cities of Florida

Most of the south is autocentric. That doesn't mean that it's "odd" to see people walking in their own n'hoods..which is what happened here.

by HogWash on Apr 16, 2012 4:44 pm • linkreport

@Hogwash; exactly on point.

When urbanism turns into kultur-war, this is what happens. The old line about when all you have is a hammer...

In most parts of the south, I think it is safe to assume that is only poor (mexican and/or blacks) who walk. In fact, that is why I think PW county freaked out 10 years ago when mexicans started showing up on the streets.

if Sanford was a city, would it be an different? Not a great example, but a funny story. A former gf got transfered to dallas for her advertising job (working with AA). As a former resident of paris, New york, London and BA, she tried walking to lunch. A co-worker picked her up in the car car and gently explained that white women don't walk around here...

by charlie on Apr 16, 2012 4:51 pm • linkreport

@Hogwash, please review my comment that "I doubt that Zimmerman was well-intentioned".

So Floridians don't believe in exercising, take the dog for a walk, a child for a bike ride?

After dark? No -- call the cops and let them sort it out like Zimmerman does. Why do you think he has so much support?

by goldfish on Apr 16, 2012 5:08 pm • linkreport

@Charlie, I wouldn't safely assume that. Most of my family is in the south and those who live in communities similar to this one, would be quite accustomed to seeing people walk w/in their n'hoods..especially those in close proximity to a school/shopping center.

@Goldish, it was 7:11pm..hardly the dead of night.

Why do you think he has so much support?

If I were honest?

The relics (or not) of racism.

That would explain how people were able to ignore the fact that Zimmerman called the police and less than 6 minutes later shoot an unarmed child and offer no viable defense other than..."well, I was following him, lost sight of him, then felt his fist pummel my nose."

It also explains how he miraculously recovered from near loss of consciousness w/in 10 minutes of being "attacked" by Martin. It also explains how people ignored the fact of the sheer physical challenge of yelling "Help, Somebody Help Me" while simultaneously having your head BASHED repeatedly to the ground.

Now imagine that scene? Imagine having your head bashed and mouth covered but still have the physical capacity to yell loud enough to be heard over the phone.

It's ingrained.

by HogWash on Apr 16, 2012 5:28 pm • linkreport

@Hogwash, a blog is a nice place to discuss these matters, but nothing will be settled until the trial (which looks to me like Zimmerman is guilty btw). I understand your outrage; so I am trying to move the discussion to something we can settle, that is, how suburban design contributes to "the relics of racism" -- if you recall, this was the reason it was included in the links in the first place.

That is why is asked the question I did. Let me rephrase it: you see a kid you don't like the looks of -- probably up to trouble -- wandering around in your neighborhood. What do you do? Give me an honest answer, and then compare that to what many people (not Zimmerman) do in Fl.

by goldfish on Apr 17, 2012 9:26 am • linkreport

@Goldfish, please don't mistaken my exasperation for outrage. I responded to your question about "support for Zimmerman" which I consider striking because supporting him means you've accepted his version of events and that Martin really did perform a sneak attack on him and caused near brain injury. It also means you support/understand the notion that he fully recovered from near brain-injuring combat in about half and hour. Now FWIW, it's a stark difference between saying that you "support" Zimmerman vs. support "justice" in this case.

WRT to "relics of racism" I don't think suburban design has anything to do w/the relics of racism. The relics I mention refer to the racial bias that has been ingrained into our consciousness. So I don't think we really can settle "design" since there is no evidence that "design" was a contributing factor in the case.

But in keeping with that, my second map shows the entrance to the community...including the sidewalk he likely used when entering it. Looking at the 2nd map, Trayvon would have entered north from Oregon onto Twin Lakes. He then went south and ended up near/in front of the community center (Zimmerman's first sighting) which is located near the 1110 block of Twin Trees. This is also where Zimmerman must have left his truck. According to Zimmerman's own 911 call, he reports that Trayvon is "running away" using the back entrance. The first map suggests that the only back entrance he could've used would have been to travel west on Twin Trees and use the "side entrance" (near what appears to be a pedestrian crosswalk @the 1210 block) and then take the sidewalk south between the first two rows of homes. This is where the fatal incident occured..about two buildings north of where Martin's dad lived.

by HogWash on Apr 17, 2012 11:20 am • linkreport

Let me rephrase it: you see a kid you don't like the looks of -- probably up to trouble -- wandering around in your neighborhood. What do you do? Give me an honest answer, and then compare that to what many people (not Zimmerman) do in Fl.

If I were honest? Oh how I love honesty..:). First, I live in SE DC. So I'm accustomed to seeing kids who fit the mold of "looking like" they're up to no good. In fact, I'm sure I "look like" I'm up to no good when I'm wearing an A-shirt, hoodie, timbz, sneaks, sweats, saggy pants etc.

Knowing this, I'm less inclined to assume ill-intent among groups of people I see walking in my n'hood. And that's real talk. I think it's easier to not ascribe ill-intent towards others when you've been faced with the same. I have no doubt that people of all races have assumed things about me that are the farthest thing from the truth.

Then I chuckle when the nice lady seems surprised that I held the door open for her to enter before doing so myself.

by HogWash on Apr 17, 2012 11:49 am • linkreport

@Hogwash: please re-read what I wrote -- I think Zimmerman is guilty, and I do not support him in any way whatsoever.

I note that you did not answer my question. You see a stranger that looks like she/he is up to trouble wandering around in your neighborhood, what do you do? Suspicion has little to do with clothing; it has to do with what person is doing.

I also live in SE, and I recognize that neighbors have to look after each other.

by goldfish on Apr 17, 2012 12:55 pm • linkreport

@Hogwash: please re-read what I wrote -- I think Zimmerman is guilty, and I do not support him in any way whatsoever.

I never suggested otherwise. Again, I responded to your question about those who "support" Zimmerman.

WRT to your question, I'm not sure what answer you're looking for. DC isn't Sanford but unless the person is actually peeking through windows, mailboxes or something similar...No I can't say that I would call the police if I saw a stranger wandering aimlessly around in my n'hood. If I were part of a n'hood watch and lived in a private community, I likely would.

Suspicion has little to do with clothing; it has to do with what person is doing.

I know that we would like to believe that. And in shangri-la, maybe people really don't judge a book by it's cover. But this is america. Clothing actually does has a lot to do w/it. I imagine that if you saw someone walking through the airport during a "N'Orleans summer" outfitted with a trench, skully, and combat boots, someone's suspicions would be raised and the person could've been only walking...nothing but walking.

OTOH, I can say from own experiences that people perceive me differently based on what I'm wearing. I notice it most weekends when I'm dressed down and people don't seem comfortable sitting beside me. I have the "look" and while it doesn't offend me much, I do realize that it exists.

I don't think the idea is foreign to most though.

by HogWash on Apr 17, 2012 2:07 pm • linkreport

Dag, I meant to add the initial "support" for Zimmerman was the result of racial bias against Martin

by HogWash on Apr 17, 2012 2:40 pm • linkreport

I think the thrust of the article was this: To Zimmerman Trayvon looked suspicious. Trayvon's attributes of being black, male and young were the primary triggers arousing suspicion in Zimmermans mind. However, another attribute added to Zimmermans suspision; the fact that Trayvon was walking. We know this from Zimmermans 911 call. He said, "He's walking", and implied that this was an activity that aroused his suspicion. The question then is "why is *walking* an activity that arouses suspicion?"

In order to explore this question further hypothetical questions are posed, such as: if the community had been designed differently so that *walking* in and of itself was not atypical and thus someone walking would not stand out as behaving atypically, would the Zimmermans of the world still have their suspicions aroused to the point of following the kid? What if Zimmerman was accustomed to seeing black teenagers walk around in his community - Trayvon would have been just one more. We know its a mixed race community, so if walking were more normative certainly kids of all races would be seen walking regularly.

Our thoughts are shaped by our environment. There is an integral relationship between environment, perspective and behavior. No one is immune to the influences of his/her environment. I think @goldfish's question (about car-dependent suburbs contributing to vestigial racism)is legitimate as is the question in the article: did the built environment contribute to the outcome? That Trayvon was walking, an atypical behavior, contributed to Zimmermans total suspicion. What if Trayvon had passed Zimmerman while driving? We know Zimmerman would have noticed him b/c he was a busy-body watching everything. But b/c driving was normative where as walking was not, would his level of suspicion been as heightened? Its a rhetorical question b/c we'll never know. The question is worth asking nontheless and asking it does nothing to diminish the tragedy.

by Tina on Apr 18, 2012 11:04 am • linkreport

@Tina, reasonable thoughts but irrelevant to what actually occurred.

In order to move the "design" conversation, I posted both the maps of the community as well as route Trayvon took. If the author or (for that matter) those here who think design "could" have been a contributing factor in the tragedy, were interested in exploring the facts as we know them, then you should at least refer to the map...the actual "design" of the community. No one has.

IMO, the article and those here have assumed things that have never been discussed as a factor. Sure Zimmerman is guilty but even he nor those who've defended him have suggested that "walking" was atypical. No one has said he stood out because he was walking. I've just seen a lot of people here talk about the "oddity" of people walking in the south.

Don't take my word for it. Look at the map. I'm not an "urban design" guy, but what could developers/officals have done w/the design in that gated (again gated) community that would have possibly changed the outcome?

You just can't (well shouldn't) conclude that "what about the design" is a worthy question to ask but then refuse to talk about the actual design. Even if I didn't think there was merit to the argument, I would be more receptive had Trayvon been killed trying to navigate an unmarked crosswalk, on a dark n'hood street w/o sidewalks or otherwise. That wasn't the case.

This design idea seems like an opportunity for designers, and those interested, to toot their own self-aggrandizing (see how important we are) horns. Otherwise, they would have (at a minimum), used the community's design as a framework. No one has. Why is that?

We have the theoretical discussion about design...and the actual map of the community. It seems atypical for us to discuss one w/o the other.

JMO

by HogWash on Apr 18, 2012 4:08 pm • linkreport

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