Greater Greater Washington

Zoning


Support a growing city and join Pro-DC

Want to see the District of Columbia become even better than it is? I'm pleased to announce Pro-DC, a group formed to organize residents to support positive change in DC's zoning update and beyond.


Photo by Samantha's Photography on Flickr.

Pro-DC is a project of the Coalition for Smarter Growth and Greater Greater Washington. We believe in helping DC grow, thrive, and become more livable for everyone. I hope you will join the email list today.

The zoning update is helping make DC more inclusive, livable, and walkable through some very important policies, such as accessory dwellings, corner stores, and removing outdated parking requirements. These changes will help older residents age in place, help newer residents afford to live and stay in DC, encourage more retail, and make streets safer.

Members of Pro-DC don't need to agree with every element of the zoning update. I don't. But we also believe that DC will grow and change regardless of public policy, and that our zoning should shape that growth in a positive way that improves the quality of life, increases amenities, and strengthens affordability for all residents.

In coming months, there will be some major battles over the zoning update that cut to the heart of how people see DC's future. These positive changes won't become reality unless decision makers hear from residents who share the vision. I hope you will join the email list, and ask your friends to do the same.

David Alpert is the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Greater Greater Washington and Greater Greater Education. He worked as a Product Manager for Google for six years and has lived in the Boston, San Francisco, and New York metro areas in addition to Washington, DC. He loves the area which is, in many ways, greater than those others, and wants to see it become even greater. 

Comments

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In Michigan Park/Woodridge there are way too many churches taking up valuable corner store space. Where do you all stand on this?

by jason on May 16, 2012 10:35 am • linkreport

There's a notable group missing in this description... residents who have been here for years and want to stay in DC.

by selxic on May 16, 2012 10:48 am • linkreport

Selxic: you might've glossed over phrases like "everyone," "all residents," and "help older residents age in place."

by bill on May 16, 2012 11:05 am • linkreport

I intentionally did not mention age in my comment, bill.

by selxic on May 16, 2012 11:15 am • linkreport

I intentionally did not mention age in my comment, bill.

By definition, anyone who has been here "for years" is older.

by JustMe on May 16, 2012 11:32 am • linkreport

residents who have been here for years and want to stay in DC.

The traditional desire of longtime residents of DC has been to move to Prince George's or Montgomery County. I'm a bit offended that you're not respecting this desire of longtime residents by ignoring their needs and their traditions, which have been part and parcel of DC culture for decades.

by JustMe on May 16, 2012 11:34 am • linkreport

JustMe, that's all good and true if the post was referring to "older" as relative to "newer residents," but I doubt you believe the post was not referring to the age of the resident.

by selxic on May 16, 2012 12:04 pm • linkreport

There's a notable group missing in this description... residents who have been here for years and want to stay in DC.
by selxic on May 16, 2012 10:48 am

That's because this blog has written those people off as NIMBYs, oops, I mean "anti neighbor."

by Jazzy on May 16, 2012 12:30 pm • linkreport

since it was about older residents aging in place, whom else would it refer to?

55 YO empty nesters from the suburbs, new to DC, who need help to stay in their empty nesting spot? That seems a fairly tortured reading.

Im pretty sure the vast majority of elderly in DC are long time residents.

by AWalkerInTheCity on May 16, 2012 12:31 pm • linkreport

Well, then I'm baffled about what the post could've possibly said that would've made you happy. It's almost like the words "everyone" and "all" are offensive to you because you want to explicitly exclude certain people.

by bill on May 16, 2012 1:01 pm • linkreport

There's a notable group missing in this description... residents who have been here for years and want to stay in DC.
That's because this blog has written those people off as NIMBYs, oops, I mean "anti neighbor."

I thought it was because we already have dozens of DC government programs (funded with tens of millions of dollars per year) doing exactly that. As we should.

by oboe on May 16, 2012 1:03 pm • linkreport

JustMe, that's all good and true if the post was referring to "older" as relative to "newer residents," but I doubt you believe the post was not referring to the age of the resident.

People get older as they age. I'm almost 40, and I've lived in DC for 5 years. Presumably someone who's been here for 20-30 years is older than I am.

Unless you want everyone who's been here 10-15 years to receive the benefit of some kind of polocy to ensure they can stay.

by JustMe on May 16, 2012 1:52 pm • linkreport

I thought it was because we already have dozens of DC government programs (funded with tens of millions of dollars per year) doing exactly that. As we should.

Slow day for me but I didn't get this either?

by HogWash on May 16, 2012 1:57 pm • linkreport

Bill, I'm specifically referring to the following:
These changes will help older residents age in place, help newer residents afford to live and stay in DC, encourage more retail, and make streets safer.
Perhaps we're arguing over poor verbiage. I interpret "older residents" as seniors since the next portion of the sentence is allowing them to "age in place." That's a strange choice of words if it's meant to include a 20-something who has been in the city their entire life.

I'm not opposed to making the city better or even updating zoning codes, but whether by oversight or omission the post did not include residents who are not new to DC or families. Those are the groups likely affected the most by changes and the groups that have the greatest fears (affordability, displacement, services, etc.). Those groups should explicitly be mentioned if the hope and intent is to move people to support.

by selxic on May 16, 2012 2:09 pm • linkreport

Presumably someone who's been here for 20-30 years is older than I am.

Insert large question mark.

But seriously, are you joking???

by Jazzy on May 16, 2012 2:44 pm • linkreport

I thought it was because we already have dozens of DC government programs (funded with tens of millions of dollars per year) doing exactly that. As we should.
Slow day for me but I didn't get this either?

http://housingforallblog.org/2012/05/big-housing-wins-in-todays-budget/

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/dc-politics/dc-council-revises-gray-budget-restores-human-services-funds/2012/05/15/gIQAoNp1RU_story.html

by oboe on May 16, 2012 3:12 pm • linkreport

But seriously, are you joking???

If they moved here 20-30 years ago as adults, they're likely older than I am. Maybe selxic feels that people who were born here deserve special protection and consideration outside of simply improving the jobs and economy situation? I don't know.

by JustMe on May 16, 2012 3:24 pm • linkreport

aka yimby? i am in.

by h street landlord on May 16, 2012 5:32 pm • linkreport

Please re-read the post and my comments, JustMe.

by selxic on May 17, 2012 12:56 am • linkreport

@ Jazzy

The comment Presumably someone who's been here for 20-30 years is older than I am is usually accompanied by the comment nobody lived or moved here before people like me moved in, we really turned this dump of a neighborhood around.

But srsly, somebody help me out here: Is someone who is opposed to a big daycare center in a new development in a booming neighborhood with growing elementary school enrollment and lots of young families a NIMBY or a YIMBY?

by Trulee Pist on May 26, 2012 5:15 pm • linkreport

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