Greater Greater Washington

Learn about transit networks and network around TRB

The massive Transportation Research Board annual conference is coming up in January, which means tens of thousands of transportation professionals descend on DC. Even if you're not going, there are a number of worthwhile events at or around TRB that are open to the public.


The event matrix at TransportationCamp 2012. Photo by justgrimes on Flickr.

Jarrett Walker is giving a 2-day course in transit network design that will teach a lot to professionals and amateurs alike. TransportationCamp gets people talking about innovative technologies in an "unconference" before the stuffier main conference, and a YPT networking reception connects transportation professionals young and old.

TransportationCamp: The day before the conference starts, Saturday January 12, is the TransportationCamp "unconference" focusing on how innovative systems like information technology, bike sharing and more are transforming transportation.

An innovative theme gets an innovative format: In contrast to the structured sessions where people present papers they submitted many months ago, an "unconference" lets people propose their own sessions, and if folks want to attend, they do!

TransportationCamp is 9:30 am to 5 pm at GMU Founders' Hall, 3351 Fairfax Drive, Arlington (Virginia Square Metro). It costs $20. Register here.

Jarrett Walker's network design course: On the other end, right after TRB, transit guru Jarrett Walker is giving a 2-day course in how to design transit networks. Walker writes,

The course builds an understanding of network design by working in small groups on specific network design problems in a fictional city. The whole course is about 65% fun and interactive exercises, 25% discussion, and 10% me lecturing.

People come out of the course with a much clearer sense of what transit can and can't be expected to do in various situations, and the questions it requires communities to ask. It also builds your understanding ofexactly how other areas of activityincluding transport policy, development, and land use planningprofoundly determine public transit outcomes.

The course costs $495 for the 2 days, minus 5% if you register before December 28, 10% for full-time students, and 10% for a group of 5 or more. Register here.

Young professionals' reception: The Young Professionals in Transportation and TRB Young Members' Council are having a reception during TRB that's open to everyone, TRB participants and not, young and not so much. The focus is helping young professionals network with each other and with their more established counterparts.

The event is 5:45-7:15 pm on Tuesday, January 15, on the mezzanine level of the Marriott in Woodley Park. The event is free.

Are there other events you know of during TRB that are open to folks not going to the conference? If so, post them in the comments!

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David Alpert is the founder and editor-in-chief of Greater Greater Washington. He worked as a Product Manager for Google for six years and has lived in the Boston, San Francisco, and New York metro areas in addition to Washington, DC. He now lives with his wife and daughter in Dupont Circle. 

Comments

The TRB is a good and informative event. I was a speaker several years ago and especially enjoined interacting with the attendees. Many interesting ideas are exchanged.

by TMT on Dec 19, 2012 10:06 am • linkreport

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