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Breakfast links: Boxed in


Photo by sinchume on Flickr.
Show us the money: Dr. Gridlock effectively sums up the transportation funding problem: "Our transportation funding formula is in perfect balance: We are determined to win relief from congestion, and equally determined not to pay for it." (Post)

Must be really big Apple fans: Douglas Development is building some new apartments in DC without windows with only a skylight providing natural light. The units will be in an old skating rink making exterior windows impossible. (DCist)

Should Metro play more small ball?: There's a lot of focus on some big problems at Metro, but could there be some small things Metro can do, like better lighting or a shorter NextBus phone number, that would help the system? (Post)

Bike to Pittsburgh: A final segment of the Great Allegheny Passage between DC and Pittsburgh is set to be completed in May. When complete, cyclists and pedestrians will be able to make the entire 330-mile trip without interruption or detours. (DCist, Gavin)

Ray LaHood retrospective: Ray LaHood looks back on his last four years as DOT Secretary. He also thinks the next secretary needs to have a vision to put people to work. Meanwhile, bike advocates want the next secretary to be like LaHood. (Streetsblog)

Less parking equals livelier city: A UPenn study finds that cities with more parking are also less vibrant and vice versa. This rebuts common arguments that more parking is what downtowns need to thrive. (Atlantic Cities)

All doors opening: Seven months after implementing all-door boarding at San Francisco's Muni, dwell times at bus stops have been reduced and fare evasion has declined. (Streetsblog, H St LL)

Another GGWer gets attention: TranspoCamp South, held at Georgia Tech this weekend, included a packed session led by our own Matt Johnson on the history of MARTA. Good job, Matt! (Creative Loafing)

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Steven Yates grew up in Indiana before moving to DC in 2002 to attend college at American University. He currently lives in Southwest DC.  

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The Metro article discussed a rider's suggestion that escalators be marked to indicate which side is for standing and which side is for walking.

Appallingly, Metro's response is that they "don't encourage walking on escalators for safety reasons."

Apparently Metro believes its riders are too stupid to negotiate an escalator. Perhaps we should all be placed in protective bubbles before entering the system..?

So what do they encourage us to do when the escalators are inoperative? Stand there and wait pa

by dcmike on Feb 14, 2013 8:41 am • linkreport

The Metro article discussed a rider's suggestion that escalators be marked to indicate which side is for standing and which side is for walking.

Appallingly, Metro's response is that they "don't encourage walking on escalators for safety reasons."

Apparently Metro believes its riders are too stupid to negotiate an escalator. Perhaps we should all be placed in protective bubbles before entering the system..?

So what do they encourage us to do when the escalators are inoperative? Stand there and wait patiently for them to be repaired?

by dcmike on Feb 14, 2013 8:41 am • linkreport

Apparently at some point WMATA lawyers decided that if they make walking on moving escalators an official policy and somebody falls, they could be liable.

Of course it's dumb but markings on escalators isn't going to clue in clueless people as to which side they should stand on. It's just another passive-aggressive way of "fixing" things because people in DC are apparently unable to speak up and just tell people to get out of the way.

by MLD on Feb 14, 2013 8:45 am • linkreport

Rather reminds me of when the TSA hired Disney to help improve the experience of being forced to queue up to get back into your own country.

But yes, life is a game of details and it is very clear that WMATA doesn't care about their cattle.

by charlie on Feb 14, 2013 8:46 am • linkreport

I've always thought that one very simple and free thing metro could do to improve a rider's experience is to have classical or jazz playing in all the stations. The sound systems are already in place. All that have to do is turn on WETA. Would create a more pleasant way to pass the 20 minute headways.

by MJ on Feb 14, 2013 8:50 am • linkreport

But yes, life is a game of details and it is very clear that WMATA doesn't care about their cattle.

He said in response to an article about a public meeting in which WMATA directly interacted with the public to ask them what they want.

by MLD on Feb 14, 2013 8:51 am • linkreport

RE: Muni Fare evasion

All-door boarding is a good idea, but I'm not sure I buy that fare evasion is down. Fare evasion is incredibly difficult to measure. It doesn't really matter either as long as your revenue doesn't tank when you institute proof-of-payment.

by MLD on Feb 14, 2013 9:19 am • linkreport

Is it legal to build an apartment without windows for egress? Even if it is, I just can't imagine living in one.

by rdhd on Feb 14, 2013 9:25 am • linkreport

Several ideas I have for improving Metro that would have little or no cost:

More musicians - Metro infrequently has live performers in or around its stations. In other cities, musicians are much more frequent in subway stations and bus depots. Immediate, cheap, and frequent access to art /music is one of city life's greatest pleasures, and I wish that steer performers were more welcome in the Metro system.

Whatever rules/licensing is in place to allow street performers in Metro, they must be lessened to increase the supply. If there are to enoug applicants, Meyro should reach out to local performing arts schools and performing groups, and invite them and facilitate the application process.

Public art: Metro's stations are universally drab and uninteresting to view. The vaulted brutalist ceilings of the Metro stations can be awe-inspiring, but quickly lose the rider's interest if they use the system with any frequency. Why not feature more art displays? These create a sense of place, and allow each station to develop its own identity, especially desirable if it can reflec the local community that the station serves.

Artists are so hungry for publicity, I bet you could get a lot of new art for display for free.

Station cleanliness: Aboveground metro stations, especially those towards the ends of the one, are frequently marred by piles of leaves, discarded newspapers, and litter. This is an eyesore. Metro should have all efforts to ensure their properties are kept clean. If this is too much of a burden, perhaps a metro station adoption program could be organized, the way tha state highways and other roads often are adopted by churches, Boy and Girl Scout groups, and other community legs, who then perform litter pick up, etc. A metro station that is not kept clean is not one we can be proud of. The system should be operated efficiently and reliably, but Metro also needs to realize that riders also base their experience on their experience in and around that station. A station tha provides an unpleasant view will affec the rider's perception of the entire system, and affect a tourist's perception of the safety/quality of the entire city.

by Adam on Feb 14, 2013 9:34 am • linkreport

Lots of complaints in the methodology of the parking study. But it seems the problem is with people assuming that this must mean that parking is bad. Then of course people start repeating that corellation is not causation over and over again.

I get that, but when you have a really strong correllation about something that is talked about a lot then its reasonable to assume that what people have been assuming (you need parking to attract people) is counter intuitive more often than its not.

Now obviously you need to replace the parking with something worth going to but at the margins where a city is deciding between that incremental parking lot or allowing something else to be built then you can make a safe bet on the latter.

by drumz on Feb 14, 2013 9:34 am • linkreport

Regarding walking on Metro escalators, I seem to remember that years ago there actually were signs on the escalators instructing riders to stand to the right and walk on the left. On one trip back I noticed they were gone and I asked a resident about it. He said Metro had taken them off due to liability concerns - if someone following the instructions to walk on the left side should fall, Metro could be sued for a lot of money. It was a long time ago - it could have been another system, but I think it was Metro.

by ksu499 on Feb 14, 2013 9:38 am • linkreport

How is an apartment with no windows, only a skylight okay from a fire code perspective?

by The Dawn of a New Gray on Feb 14, 2013 9:39 am • linkreport

@MJ:

I've always thought that one very simple and free thing metro could do to improve a rider's experience is to have classical or jazz playing in all the stations. The sound systems are already in place. All that have to do is turn on WETA. Would create a more pleasant way to pass the 20 minute headways.

That's not exactly free, since ASCAP has gotten very good at finding ways to go after people (like restaurant and store owners) who play music for customers or other groups of people.

One simple thing they could do is fix how they use the sound system. Repeated messages about calling a special number for the transit police or about elevator outages on stations far away annoy riders and make it hard to get across actual information about emergencies or problems on the lines. Simply reducing this auditory clutter could help all around.

by The Dawn of a New Gray on Feb 14, 2013 9:50 am • linkreport

Silicon Valley getting new 16 mile BART extension to San Jose. While CalTran is doing OK, light rail through the area is a failure.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-02-12/silicon-valley-where-mass-transit-goes-to-die.html?cmpid=hpbv

by Tom Coumaris on Feb 14, 2013 9:51 am • linkreport

"Silicon Valley getting new 16 mile BART extension to San Jose. While CalTran is doing OK, light rail through the area is a failure. "

Indeed - thats why a light rail line from say, Tysons, out the tech corridor up Rte 7 past Dulles, would be a poor idea in my opinion. Or even, (what Ive seen some suggest) a light rail line up rte 7 from Dulles Town Center to Leesburg. Folly, complete folly.

by AWalkerInTheCity on Feb 14, 2013 9:56 am • linkreport

Fire code for the interior apartments with only a skylight: Looking at the cross section diagram on UrbanTurf, looks like there might be 2 doors to the interior loft apartments. A main front door and a back door on the other end to the other corridor. Or maybe the apartments will come with a pull-down ladder for escaping through the skylight. But that likely would not be code compliant.

A city should have unusual funky apartments squeezed into an existing space. Should not all be boring cookie cutter condos or apartments.

by AlanF on Feb 14, 2013 9:57 am • linkreport

@The Dawn of a New Gray

So find some recordings that are in the public domain, or licensed for free commercial use (eg CC-By; CC-By-SA; CC-By-ND).

Actually I really dislike the idea. More buskers maybe, but no piped in muzak, thanks.

by Lucre on Feb 14, 2013 10:09 am • linkreport

I'm ok with the apartment as I actually live in an English basement right now with only two small windows (plus a the front door has another small pane) and I find it doesn't bother me at all. I mean hell it's usually not that bright out when I get up in the morning anyway and unless I come straight home after work it's probably already dark in the winter. I think the skylight would be sufficient and you avoid that awful afternoon sun exposure. That said obviously it needs to be up to code.

by Alan B. on Feb 14, 2013 10:10 am • linkreport

Low hanging fruit Metro improvements: No, playing music through the sound system would only be annoying. Cutting between the music and announcements would be even more annoying.

Art work and live music in stations - good idea. Given the dim lighting and desire to keep clutter down in the main platform areas, would not put art work there. But in the mezzanine and access areas in the busiest city stations, more artwork and live musicians (who would have to be approved and licensed) would make it more interesting.

My suggestion for the escalators would be to speed them up a notch. I know the speeds were set lower many years ago because of safety concerns, but I think most other US transit systems have faster escalators than the DC Metro. Come on, make them just a little faster. Well, when the escalators are working.

by AlanF on Feb 14, 2013 10:13 am • linkreport

I always though more art and performers should be in metro. There should be a way to contribute to a general fund to ensure they all get like minimum wage plus whatever tips because a lot of us dont carry around a lot of cash most of the time. Same thing with public art, there should be a small fund to pay for expenses incurred by artists for temporary displays. Lots of stations have enough space but obviously priority shoudld be given to circulation and there shouldnt be anything past the farebox. I absolutely adore the installation on the platforms on the 14th St - 8 Ave station in New York. Maybe I'm overthinking it but it would be great to have a local artists clause that required participants to be from DC or one of the surrounding counties.

by Alan B. on Feb 14, 2013 10:18 am • linkreport

Apparently Metro believes its riders are too stupid to negotiate an escalator.

If you ride the Metro during the height of tourist season, you'd be inclined to agree.

by Resident on Feb 14, 2013 10:18 am • linkreport

RE: signs on the escalators instructing riders to stand to the right and walk on the left. If this is true, it was before 1980. That's when I started riding the system and I've never seen them.

by Juanita de Talmas on Feb 14, 2013 10:24 am • linkreport

Following up on Adam's post, two important things that Metro could do for station and train cleanliness are:

1) ban distribution/boxes for the free tabloid papers within x feet of a station entrance. I've been riding Metro for a long time and when the cleanliness of Metro started to deteriorate a lot was after the advent of those free papers. When riders carried the Post or other papers that they paid for, they usually took them with them or put them in the recycling bin.

2) Ban coffee cups, expecially the disposable ones with the flimsy lids. Metro says they're ok if you don't sip, but that's not the point (and rides sip). If a train lurches or when subway surfers can't balance bag/briefcase, iphone and coffee, the cups get dropped and passengers and train interiors get splattered with a hot beverage. It's not just a cleanliness issue, it's a safety one.

by Jasper on Feb 14, 2013 10:26 am • linkreport

Am I the only person who doesn't care for buskers? I'd rather metro just focus on making sure trains run on time and more frequently than devoting resources to figuring out how to make sure some guy with a guitar can play easy-rock classics in the station. Or worse, some bucket drummer who has no conception of dynamics or syncopation.

by drumz on Feb 14, 2013 10:29 am • linkreport

@MLD; new in DC? There is a huge difference is ASKING for input and then doing it.

by charlie on Feb 14, 2013 10:32 am • linkreport

drumz, I feel the same way you do. I don't want or need buskers or public art or piped in music. I want a functioning system that can reliably get me from A to B, without regular delays, escalators out of service for 6+ months, and stations that look like war zones for years on end (Farragut North).

by Birdie on Feb 14, 2013 10:38 am • linkreport

The point of asking about the low-hanging fruit at a meeting is that they are working on the big problems (delays, breakdowns, escalators) but that will take a long time.

I don't know if it's low-hanging fruit but brighter lighting in the stations would be a welcome improvement.

by MLD on Feb 14, 2013 10:52 am • linkreport

It's just another passive-aggressive way of "fixing" things because people in DC are apparently unable to speak up and just tell people to get out of the way.

And all saints shall say, AMEN! Whether it's lack of courage or indifference, people tend to NOT ask. What's wrong w/tapping the person on the "passing" side and asking them to move? Throughout all my years in DC, I've never had anyone not move out the way or allow me a seat. Yet, I often hear people complain about just that. Sure, I've gotten snarls but so what! Open your mouths folks.

1)No music over the Metrowaves
2)Performances should be limited to main transfer points like L'Enfant, Metrocenter, and Gallery Place. Not sure I would for UStation
3)Artwork can make it look nicer, where would it be positioned?
3)Better lighting
4)Better announcements
5)If they ban distribution boxes..shouldn't they do the same for MetroExpress, Examiner hand distributions?
6)Banning coffee cups might cause I riot. I don't drink it but can honestly state that I've never seen it spilled.
7)Do something about closing doors on crowded platforms before a reasonable number of people are allowed to get on.
8)Train operators to make announcements as if they want people to actually hear them

by HogWash on Feb 14, 2013 10:55 am • linkreport

Oh, come now.

Even at its absolute worst, Farragut North looks better than every single underground rail station in the US, outside of DC. Let's keep some perspective here.

I agree that some of the station improvements have been inexplicably slow (seriously, how long does it take to replace a false ceiling or re-tile a platform?). However, we've still got the nicest and cleanest subway stations in the nation.

The repetitive announcements are also apparently deliberate. Metro apparently believes that they help improve safety and security. Personally, I'd like to see them spaced out a bit further when the lines are running on long headways (which is a far bigger problem than the escalators or cleanliness)

by andrew on Feb 14, 2013 10:56 am • linkreport

More lighting would be nice (or painting the undersides of the mezzanines white which helps a lot.) I'd like to spend my time waiting for the train reading which would be nice to do without eventually going blind over strain.

by drumz on Feb 14, 2013 10:56 am • linkreport

I'm with drumz & Birdie, I don't want extra noise in the Metro. If I want music, I'll pop in some ear buds and listen. The stations are noisy enough without having to be forced to listen to canned or live music. Can you imagine one of the plastic bucket drummers setting up inside? Ick.

by Moose on Feb 14, 2013 10:57 am • linkreport

The article suggesting that, "Cars and Robust Cities Are Incompatible" sounds like a whole lot of 1+1=6 1/2.

While I get the point about sampling smaller cities, it would've been nice had the findings proved that cars hindered the growth of Chicago, NYC, Philly, DC and even Atlanta. But that's not the case. I don't think we should discount the migration from the inner cities to the suburbs.

by HogWash on Feb 14, 2013 11:00 am • linkreport

Pretty much agree with everything that Hogwash wrote. Re: positioning, some stations have an abundance of space. In Courthouse there is about a ~900 sq foot central atrium that would be perfect for a small installation. Plenty of room in Columbia Heights. A mini jazz program in U St station would be cool. I would definitely not put musicians or art anywhere where access is primarly through long narrow corridors. It should be easy enough for Metro to come up with a dozen pilot stations keeping in mind geometry and also preferally higher ridership.

by Alan B. on Feb 14, 2013 11:13 am • linkreport

@MLD, I always start with a polite "excuse me" but when the situation calls for it, I have no reservations about using my 6'4" 230lb frame to force my way through people blocking the train doors or escalators.

@Adam, I agree about street performers/artists. Oddly enough WMATA allows racist, offensive advertising and those annoying free newspapers to junk up the trains - both under the guise of free speech. I would think street performers have the same right..

by dcmike on Feb 14, 2013 11:15 am • linkreport

Another note about painting escalator steps to show where to walk and where to stand: what happens when the escalator gets reversed for whatever reason? What happens when the steps from one escalator that's always used for "up" get moved to another that's always used for "down." Definitely let's keep paint off of escalator steps.

I believe Metro will make some inroads on some of the smaller improvements as they work to build up a head of steam for getting support for Momentum. You can't get the public and elected officials to support a multi-billion system expansion plan if they don't have confidence in your ability to spend a few dollars to replace a light bulb.

by recyclist on Feb 14, 2013 11:17 am • linkreport

@dcmike: Oddly enough WMATA allows racist, offensive advertising and those annoying free newspapers to junk up the trains - both under the guise of free speech. I would think street performers have the same right..

WMATA doesn't allow racist, offensive advertising. The US courts do. Metro just complies.

by recyclist on Feb 14, 2013 11:19 am • linkreport

How about just a stripe down the middle of the escalator steps and an occasional note to "share the way" or something?

by Alan B. on Feb 14, 2013 11:30 am • linkreport

Regarding walking on Metro escalators, I seem to remember that years ago there actually were signs on the escalators instructing riders to stand to the right and walk on the left.

There's a fine distinction here. Metro used to run automated audio announcements where they talked about the escalators. These were framed at tourists. They went something like this:

"Hi, welcome to Metro. First time riding with us? You'll find we have lots of escalators in our system, and most people stand on the right side."

They never mention walking on the left, merely that riders should stand on the right.

by Alex B. on Feb 14, 2013 11:32 am • linkreport

@ by Jasper on Feb 14, 2013 10:26

Hey, hey, ho, ho. That ain't me.
Can you please choose a different name?

by Jasper on Feb 14, 2013 11:49 am • linkreport

I wish I hadn't read the comments on the dooring bill being shot down in VA. Makes me want to take my U-lock for a spin tonight and I promised I wouldn't be a dick for Lent.

by thump on Feb 14, 2013 11:54 am • linkreport

@AlanF. With respect to the building code, there are two separate issues. The unit must have a means of egress (provided by the door obviously). A separate provision of the Code requires Emergency Escape and Rescue from sleeping rooms. Many times, windows a maximum of 44" off the floor are used for this purpose, but not universally. The door complies with this requirement because the "sleeping room" is coterminous with the main room of the space. Typically, residential units of less than 2000 sf can have only one means of egress. I'm guessing the door on the second level of the loft is a walk-in closet.

by Paul on Feb 14, 2013 11:54 am • linkreport

The sound systems are already in place.

they are working on the big problems (delays, breakdowns, escalators) but that will take a long time.

we've still got the nicest and cleanest subway stations in the nation.

I believe Metro will make some inroads on some of the smaller improvements

Hahahahahahahahahahahahaha.

by Bitter Brew on Feb 14, 2013 12:01 pm • linkreport

I don't know if it's low-hanging fruit but brighter lighting in the stations would be a welcome improvement.

The low hanging fruit part is replacing light bulbs that are not working...like they're supposed to do but don't actually do. One step above that would be cleaning the covers on the light fixtures because they're so dirty that light has a tough time passing through them.

by Falls Church on Feb 14, 2013 12:02 pm • linkreport

Atlanta's MARTA system has classical music in many of its stations, which was a nice touch. It's probably easy to find public domain classical music.

I like buskers outside of stations, but would veto them in station. No one is going to be pleased with the musical choices and there's enough panhandling as it is.

The parking study is just confounded. Of course carbound cities will have more parking and less life, and sections of cities riddled with car lots 9esp. the surface kind) will be less lively. they're also comparing struggling central cities with not-so-struggling, relatively dense, streetcar era suburbs, which is apples and oranges. Hartford's downtown was dead in the 80s when I lived there and New Haven's was in somewhat worse shape, although there are more signs of life now than in the past.

by Rich on Feb 14, 2013 12:13 pm • linkreport

The low hanging fruit part is replacing light bulbs that are not working...like they're supposed to do but don't actually do.

It's funny you mention this as an example. Watching a crew apparently in Archives to change lightbulbs was one of a half-dozen or so experiences that convinced me that Metro may be beyond repair. The answer to "how many personnel does it require to not change a lightbulb" turned out to be 3, plus 2 Metro PD officers, plus the station manager, plus a pair of passengers who they spent an entire Yellow Line headway flirting with.

When I returned two hours later from U Street, the 3 workers, and the station manager, were still in exactly the same spot. Thankfully, the police officers were back on duty...

by Bitter Brew on Feb 14, 2013 12:13 pm • linkreport

Yes, train annoucements should certainly be clearer. How about pre-recorded, clear announcements of station stops, for a start? (Like the 'doors closing' announcement.) It's hard to see station signs through tinted windows in dark underground stations, and clear announcements would help visitors and other occasional Metro riders. And when drivers do announce, please speak clearly and e-nun-ci-ate. Some announcements are so slurred, they sound like Marion Barry on one of his more strung-out days.

by JasperJ on Feb 14, 2013 12:15 pm • linkreport

"I always though more art and performers should be in metro. There should be a way to contribute to a general fund to ensure they all get like minimum wage plus whatever tips..."

Hey, I'm all for the minimum wage and increasing it, but don't you think that Metro administering a minimum wage scheme for buskers is taking the nanny state a little to far? (As if Metro didn't have enough challenges) Mary Cheh, call your office!

by JasperJ on Feb 14, 2013 12:21 pm • linkreport

WMATA could use

1 Better way to navigate their phone system I dont want to hear 5 minutes of annoucements everytime I call.

2 Fix their speech system; the phone dont understand most people I tried this with friends from here and from around the world the could not navigate the voice system it did not understand them

3 Nextbus fix the damn thing its to sensitive; if you are at a bus stop every damn car/bus/truck driving by, person speaking, dog barking makes the system stop and ask you what did you say or starts over.

4 Fix the hours of system operation they are wrong Metrorail does not close at 3am on Friday and Saturdays it close 3am on Saturdays and Sundays

5 Update the website in a timely manner.

6 Bus Schedules that are not just PDF's on the site, have a webpage for each bus line, with list of all stops, route map, schedule etc.

7 Make info such as delays for rail and bus more visible on the website, you see rail delays upon going to the home page but not the buses both should be equally displayed.

8 Dedicated number for Nextbus I should not have to dial main number then press 6, then enter stop, then say bus route. I should be able to call dedicated number, and enter or say stop id thats it. I should have the ability to get info on stops such as ones across the street or two blocks if bus routes cross each other.

9 There should be someone updating the site about delays on bus and rail 24/7. I have waited for buses that have been detoured at 2am due to accidents and or police issues but WMATA's site says nothing of it so I miss the last bus. As long as the system is operating there should be atleast 1 person there to update the site, twitter account or phone system about delays/detours.

10 I would rather not have music its annoying rather have quietness, art as in paintings or statues etc are fine as long as they dont block anything.

by kk on Feb 14, 2013 1:29 pm • linkreport

Music? No. Buskers? No.

If you want music while riding Metro, bring an iPod with headphones. Don't force the rest of us to put up with it.

As for changes I would like to see, how about enforcing the rules? I routinely see people eating on the Metro and making a mess (with the most egregious recent example being a woman eating fried chicken and throwing the bones on the floor). There's also a lot of very aggressive panhandling (aggressive enough that an easily intimidated person might view it as a mugging rather than just panhandling). But I've never seen any rule-breaker ticketed or even asked to stop.

by Rob on Feb 14, 2013 1:41 pm • linkreport

"The answer to "how many personnel does it require to not change a lightbulb" turned out to be 3, plus 2 Metro PD officers, plus the station manager, plus a pair of passengers who they spent an entire Yellow Line headway flirting with."

Ha! Although I haven't seen it lately, it used to be pretty common to see three or so Metro employees, probably supervisors, standing with their clipboards on a station platform. When a train arrived, they would all write the time on their clipboards. I wondered, did they all have to confer, like NFL referees on a challenged call? It seems that one could have done the job, or better yet have used automated sensors.

by JasperJ on Feb 14, 2013 1:53 pm • linkreport

The answer to "how many personnel does it require to not change a lightbulb" turned out to be 3, plus 2 Metro PD officers, plus the station manager, plus a pair of passengers who they spent an entire Yellow Line headway flirting with.

When I returned two hours later from U Street, the 3 workers, and the station manager, were still in exactly the same spot. Thankfully, the police officers were back on duty...

I'm not so sure. Two police officers flirting with two passengers, all gone away, no?

by David R. on Feb 14, 2013 2:02 pm • linkreport

Gabe Klein for transpo secretary?

by Gavin on Feb 14, 2013 4:01 pm • linkreport

Silicon Valley getting new 16 mile BART extension to San Jose. While CalTran is doing OK, light rail through the area is a failure.
VTA's version of light rail is a prime example of how to NOT build a system. You do NOT permit ANY single tracking. One should also avoid building automobile thruways that would encourage car use over transit.

The other two NorCal light rail systems - SFMuni's and Sacramento's - are much stronger. Granted, SFMuni makes plenty of mistakes but has a good ridership base. And Sacto. is expanding their system with links to major nodes like a college campus ("Blue Line to Cosumnes River College" on the "Planning & Construction" page).

SFMuni
Sacto. Regional Transit

by Ted K. on Feb 17, 2013 9:44 pm • linkreport

P.S. My phrase "makes plenty" includes a long history of errors of both commission and omission. Part of what's wrong with the Central Subway (aka T-Third Phase II) project can be traced to design choices in the first phase of the T-Third light rail line.

P.P.S. San Jose / Santa Clara VTA

by Ted K. on Feb 17, 2013 10:11 pm • linkreport

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