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Photo by thisisbossi on Flickr.
Businesses want streetcar: Arlington businesses of all sizes are enthusiastic about the streetcar, and want it as soon as possible. (Crystal City BID)

Road diet a success: 2 years after giving Lawyers Road a road diet, crashes and speeding is down while maintaining travel times. 74% of residents in a survey say the road is better than before. (FABB)

Bike lanes... for whom?: Many cyclists in Arlington aren't riding for recreation and aren't wealthy hipsters, but because they can't drive; it's too expensive or they can't get a driver's license. (Arlington Mercury)

DASH will cost more, do less: Alexandria's DASH is raising fares. The King Street trolley will also come every 20 minutes instead of every 15, along with a few other service cuts, while a few lines will see greater service. (Patch)

Weaver may run: Bryan Weaver is laying the groundwork to run for the Ward 1 DC Council seat currently held by Jim Graham. Brianne Nadeau is already running, and with Weaver in the race there is a greater chance both will split anti-Graham votes. (Post)

DC government runs on hot air: All DC government buildings are now wind-powered. The switch saves the equivalent of 32.8 million gallons of gasoline, enough to power 61,000 cars in a year. (Borderstan)

Traffic causes asthma: For the first time, scientists have found that traffic pollution causes asthma in children. Before, scientists knew pollution could trigger episodes in children who already had asthma, but weren't sure if it was a cause. (LA Times)

And...: Some cool stuff people are doing with open data. (Atlantic Cities) ... As Arlington has grown enormously in 15 years, traffic hasn't gotten worse. (WAMU) ... The Washington housing market is not in another bubble. (Post)

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Steven Yates grew up in Indiana before moving to DC in 2002 to attend college at American University. He currently lives in Southwest DC.  
David Alpert is the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Greater Greater Washington and Greater Greater Education. He worked as a Product Manager for Google for six years and has lived in the Boston, San Francisco, and New York metro areas in addition to Washington, DC. He loves the area which is, in many ways, greater than those others, and wants to see it become even greater. 

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The blurb on Dash is a little misleading to me. True, the fares are being raised (though only now hitting typical regional rates of other agencies) and yes, the very redundant "Trolley" (who thought that getting short, single door buses for that route was a good idea?) is being scaled back for the tourist crowd, but there is more than just costs more and does less.

Both the 8 and 10 lines have improvements, and I LOVE THE IDEA OF THE NEW AT9! Tying all these places together that were previously only on Dash "radials" is a great enhancement, and daring to cross the border for the great connectivity at Shirlington is a fantastic concept!

by Adam P. on Mar 26, 2013 8:41 am • linkreport

IN terms of open data, has anyone been able to get the information from the pepco smart meters -- aside from logging into your account?

by charlie on Mar 26, 2013 9:03 am • linkreport

As Arlington has grown enormously in 15 years, traffic hasn't gotten worse.

Except if you include congestion on the Orange line. In stead of being stuck on the road, you're now stuck in a train.

@ Adam P:the very redundant "Trolley" (who thought that getting short, single door buses for that route was a good idea?) is being scaled back for the tourist crowd

I would argue that scaling back from every 15 to every 20 minutes makes it unusable for tourists. Tourists spend money. Why not make that easy for them?

by Jasper on Mar 26, 2013 9:47 am • linkreport

Some cool stuff people are doing with open data.

Darn hipsters, wanting all their data in portable formats! Why can't they just look up the data they want in books...at the library?

by oboe on Mar 26, 2013 10:03 am • linkreport

How and where is DC generating wind power for the government buildings? Or do they mean they are buying electricity from a utility company that generates power from wind? If it's the latter, I'm not particularly impressed - if DC didn't buy it, someone else would, so DC's purchase of wind power doesn't reduce the amount of power generated by coal.

by Mike on Mar 26, 2013 10:40 am • linkreport

Presumably, DC is paying PEPCO to buy wind power from Washington Gas (WGES) that feeds into the grid. That is how those interconnects work.

Given that WGES power is a bit more expensive that others, I'd say the lobbyist for Washington Gas won.

by charlie on Mar 26, 2013 10:47 am • linkreport

@charlie: I wish! I hate the format in which they provide all of that data, and wish I could play around with it on my own. I also always have to circle around the website a few times to find the data at all.

by Gray on Mar 26, 2013 10:54 am • linkreport

@Gray, I am playing around with a site called myenergy which claims to be able to pull in PEPCO data. Not having any luck, though.

by charlie on Mar 26, 2013 10:59 am • linkreport

"All DC government buildings are now wind-powered. The switch saves the equivalent of 32.8 million gallons of gasoline, enough to power 61,000 cars in a year. (Borderstan)"

- Of course you know that virtually zero buildings anywhere in the United States run on gasoline. Zero. You don't make electricity from gasoline (or almost any oil distillate for that matter). Its good they're no longer on coal, but the comparison shouldn't be to gasoline.

by Andrew on Mar 26, 2013 11:05 am • linkreport

Andrew - I agree that gas is a weird comparison for building power, but I suspect most people have a sense of what a gallon of gasoline is worth, unlike with coal. Personally, I don't know what kind of building power I'd get with a ton of coal, or how much it would cost.

by Austin on Mar 26, 2013 11:15 am • linkreport

Jasper,

My thought would be that Dash's Planning arm saw the need to increase connectivity through implementation of the new 9 line, and I can see where this could reduce a lot of backtracking and transferring, as well as to offer much improved access to Potomac Yard.

Given the obvious limited resources at hand in a small public agency, I can see where a trade off may have had to happen. Thus, I can't readily bemoan an increased wait of 5 minutes for tourists given that residents now have much improved shopping and job access and could see their own transit travel times improve by 30 minutes or more from the addition of the new crosstown route.

by Adam P. on Mar 26, 2013 11:32 am • linkreport

1. Arlco success should be trumpeted, as its a counter example to all kinds of "war on car" memes.

2. Ms Sturtevant's article does not mention interest rates. While I do not expect them to spike anytime soon, I don't see how one can even discuss if current conditions are a bubble or not without mentioning interest rates

3. Lawyers rd piece was interesting

4. Increased demand for wind power, will increase the premium for it, and encourage more to get built. The amount of wind power capacity available is not fixed

by AWalkerInTheCity on Mar 26, 2013 11:52 am • linkreport

Having attended hours of citizen meetings on the Del Ray Trolley (and Lord knows how many hours the Alexandria City staff spent on this never-to-be project), it’s a tad disappointing to see --not so much that a Del Ray Trolley will never ply Mt. Vernon Ave-- but that DASH management apparently didn’t learn a thing about the community’s needs in the process.

With all these changes being announced, it would have been a great time to bring the AT10 further into the Arlandria business district. That message came through loud and clear at the DRT community meetings. Another message: Re-route the southern end of the AT10 to take it past the independent businesses, I mean the Walgreens on the southern end of the Avenue. There’s already a vocal contingent of south end residents who complain about the noise of the AT10 in the evening; I can imagine how they’ll feel about extending the schedule an hour each night.

And while I'm shouting in the dark: DASH, please stop making excuses about not participating in NextBus. Even WMATA buses can get it right 90% of the time; that’s a lot better than provide 0% service. The recent brouhaha when the app stopped working is clear evidence that bus riders reply on real-time schedule information. If you want people to use transit, don’t make them work so hard to do so.

by SeanO on Mar 26, 2013 12:03 pm • linkreport

"As Arlington has grown enormously in 15 years, traffic hasn't gotten worse."
----
This assessment is limited to the Rossyln-Ballston corridor. It certainly doesn't take the congestion on 395 or 66 into account.

by ceefer66 on Mar 26, 2013 12:37 pm • linkreport

In my experience the King Street "trolley" hasn't run on schedule reliably, maybe 20-minute headways are just a reflection of reality. At least they brought in slightly less uncomfortable "trolleys" last year.

by alexandrian on Mar 26, 2013 12:38 pm • linkreport

It certainly doesn't take the congestion on 395 or 66 into account.

Aren't they talking about roads they control? Not state/federal controlled highways? Isn't most of that congestion from farther out suburbs?

by thump on Mar 26, 2013 12:48 pm • linkreport

There hasn't been much new development in Arlington along I395.

by AWalkerInTheCity on Mar 26, 2013 1:06 pm • linkreport

In Arlington most people in 395 and 66 aren't from Arlington anyway. The traffic comes from beyond regardless.

by Drumz on Mar 26, 2013 2:25 pm • linkreport

@Ceefer

It certainly doesn't. The study is showing that, when done right, congestion can be averted. I don't think many here would argue that the numerous 5,000 home subdivisions in Stafford, Ashburn, Manassas etc is doing anything "right"

by Kyle-W on Mar 26, 2013 2:56 pm • linkreport

limited details so far, but pedestrians were struck while standing on the sidewalk along Gerogia Avenue today. from the Post:
According to Metro officials, a Metrobus was at stopped at a bus stop when a vehicle heading north on Georgia Avenue with a 79-year-old woman driving came up on the sidewalk and struck the pedestrians.

The vehicle then re-entered the road, cutting in front of the bus, but not hitting it, said Dan Stessel, a Metro spokesman. The woman’s vehicle then hit another vehicle before coming to a stop.

read the whole thing here: http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/pedestrian-struck-in-accident-involving-bus-in-northwest-washington/2013/03/26/10632f86-9634-11e2-894a-b984cbdff2e6_story.html

by Birdie on Mar 26, 2013 4:37 pm • linkreport

The Arlington article is about the Clarendon corridor and makes no mention of growth except for that area. So adding multi-family housing to a transit corridor doesn't increase vehicle traffic.

Remarkable, but very different from the sound bite that keeps getting repeated. I'd guess that something similar has happened in part of the District that have added new multi-family development along transit lines. What's probably more remarkable is that much of the new development comes with people who have cars.

by Rich on Mar 26, 2013 4:41 pm • linkreport

I don't think Arlington has added many new single family homes though, it's basically built out. If you look at the SFR areas it's pretty much built out, and new residents ~50,000 since 1990 have mostly been along the Metro. The point is though that adding density near transit doesn't really increase traffic proportionally. I would say that this is probably most applicable to peak travel, I'd guess that Ballston still has more vehicular traffic than say Columbia Heights on a Saturday.

by Alan B. on Mar 26, 2013 4:49 pm • linkreport

@ Adam P:Given the obvious limited resources at hand in a small public agency

It is only small by choice. Alexandria would count as a major city in many European countries. They have much better bus systems. It is all about choice.

Thus, I can't readily bemoan an increased wait of 5 minutes for tourists

@ ceefer66:It certainly doesn't take the congestion on 395 or 66 into account.Because that congestion is barely caused by the growth of Arlington.

It is easy to not care about the convenience of others. I just hope you realize this next time you are a tourist and have to wait forever for a bus, or get slapped with a ridiculous tourist tax, or an airport fee paying for a stadium. What goes around, comes around.

by Jasper on Mar 27, 2013 2:34 pm • linkreport

@ Jasper "It is easy to not care about the convenience of others. I just hope you realize this next time you are a tourist and have to wait forever for a bus."

True indeed. And personally as a tourist who may come down to Alexandria a handful of times a year at most and use the trolley, I'm actually appreciative that the limited resources at Dash are being placed into a new service that a number of residents can benefit from DAILY, saving them significant time in the process. If I have to wait a few more minutes for the trolley or take the 2 or 5 into town instead, it is a small inconvenience compared to the current routings of those whom the new 9 line will benefit. I may not ride the 9 for some time, if ever, but I'm glad to see a cross-town option emerge in Alexandria as I feel it could benefit a lot of people on a far more regular basis than the trolley does.

by Adam P. on Mar 28, 2013 2:51 pm • linkreport

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