Greater Greater Washington

Bicycling


GGW on the road: Citibike struggles with software glitches

When it opened on Memorial Day, New York's Citibike instantly became the nation's largest bikeshare system. But after an alternatingly fun and frustrating Saturday touring New York City on 2 wheels, I found that the system continues to struggle with crippling software glitches.


Photo by Omar Rawlings on Flickr.

"Excuse me, do you know how this thing works?" I turned to see two middle-aged women fiddling with the bike beside me at the Citibike station in Midtown Manhattan. "Well, this is my first time using Citibike," I replied, "but I use the system in DC regularly, so hopefully this is similar." I must have looked competent, because this was already the third such inquiry I had received that morning.

It's important to note that Citibike is less than 2 months old and is already wildly successful. But the problems that plagued the system early on are still widespread and need to be resolved before it can be a legitimate transportation option for New Yorkers.

One of the system's biggest drawbacks is its unreliable software. Reports say it's the result of a corporate dispute between operator Alta and its partner that led to a switch in software.

Of the roughly 2 dozen interactions I had with docking stations over the course of a 24-hour membership, I experienced more software problems than I have in 2 years with Capital Bikeshare. The first 3 times I attempted to purchase a one-day pass, I made it to the last step of the cumbersome touchscreen process, only to receive an error message, forcing me to cancel the transaction and start over.

After the third time, the line of would-be cyclists behind me had grown so long that I decided to step aside. I walked a couple of blocks to the next station, where I repeated the process, finally succeeding on my second try. My friend, who encountered the same problem, succeeded on her third try, repeating the same steps on each attempt.


Photo by Robyn Lee on Flickr.

With memberships secured, the next hurdle was obtaining a bike. As with Capital Bikeshare, day and weekly pass users must insert their credit card at the kiosk each time they want a bike. There, they'll receive a new, 5-digit access code which they can enter at individual docks to unlock a bike.

However, on several occasions, I had to enter the same code at multiple docks before the dock let me remove a bike. After a night out with friends, I entered my code at each of 5 full docks nearby, only to be rejected each time. I waited a few minutes, got a new code, and tried again with no luck.

Determined, I walked the few blocks to a nearby station, where I repeated the same process several times, again with no success. After a circuitous conversation with a pleasant, but ultimately futile customer service rep, I threw in the towel and hailed a cab back to my hotel, deprived of a leisurely bike ride on a nice night.

There are even more issues, however. Even when it works, the registration process is slow and confusing, taking several minutes per person to complete and resulting in long lines. In tourist areas around Times Square and Central Park, these queues have become prime targets for bike rental hawkers, who pose as Good Samaritans to mislead prospective bikers about the fees associated with Citibike.

Citibike's mobile app was great for finding open docks and available bikes throughout the city, but its information on bike lanes was poor. Hoping to avoid the pedestrian chaos of Times Square as I headed south on Broadway, I followed a bike lane shown on the app. I made a left on 48th Street, then a right on 7th Avenue, and found myself in the middle of 5 lanes of fast-moving downtown traffic with no bike lane in sight.

As a regular bike commuter, I shrugged off the honks and yells from motorists that ensued, but I can imagine the tourists I met earlier being put off by the same experience.

Overall, the system functioned more often than it didn't, and allowed my friends and I the freedom to explore the city at our own pace, while enjoying the beautiful weather and getting some exercise along the way.

And while the glitches were frustrating, the quality and quantity of bicycle infrastructure, everything from protected on-street lanes to recreational paths and bike-specific traffic signals, was impressive, a part of the larger transformation of the city's streets led by Mayor Bloomberg and his transportation commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan.

And the Citibike system continues to expand; despite the problems, underserved neighborhoods are already clamoring for stations of their own. As it grows, it can become what Capital Bikeshare is for DC: an integral part of the city's larger transportation network. But for that to happen, the system's operators need to iron out the software problems and provide users more reliable information.

Jay Corbalis lives and bikes in DC, where he is the Manager of Planning and Communications for the Capitol Riverfront BID. Before joining the BID Jay worked to promote smart growth at LOCUS and NJ Future. He has a bachelor's degree in Urban and Regional Studies from Cornell University and is pursuing a Masters in Real Estate Development at Georgetown. 

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I had a similar experience using Citibike a couple weeks ago. One huge docking station was not accepting any bikes at all and I could not take out a bike from another docking station using my code and had to walk to the next one. I realize this occasionally happens with CaBi docking stations but I've never been affected by it in the 3 years I've been a member.

There are also huge swaths of Midtown where it is faster (and certainly safer) to walk rather than bike, and the stations in the middle of all that seemed to be little more than novelties for tourists. There is simply no room for improved bike facilities on certain east-west routes given the amount if pedestrian and auto traffic. The uptown-downtown lanes on the east side are fantastic and the Citibike stations along those routes do get a ton of use, but I noticed that salmoning appears to be much more common in NY than it is in DC.

Finally, I was frustrated that there are no stations above 60th street since I have friends up in the 90s. Determined to use the system as much as possible, I would bike to the last station then cab or walk the final ~30 blocks. I'm sure an expansion is in the works for Uptown but the system was not as useful for me as I'd hoped it would be.

by Dno on Jul 29, 2013 11:47 am • linkreport

Even ignoring for a second the ongoing technical problems, theres a big operational oversight as well:

As you mentioned, each and every time you need a bike, as a tourist, you must interact with the kiosk.

Having one, and only one kiosk for a 60 bike station is idiotic. If you have three people in front of you, each going through the 3 minute signup process, and you just need a number...

You might as well have walked.

But actually, one shouldnt ignore the constant ongoing technical glitches. Any other company would have been fined or sued after delivering a broken product over a year late, and smaller than promised. Alta? Their reward is a new contract in another city.

Meanwhile in Boston, it's late summer, and the spring 2013 expansion is nowhere in site.

And how about DC? Have those 50 Fall 2013 stations come in yet?

Its a constant legacy of over-promise and under-deliver. You'd think Alta was a military contractor.

by JJJJJJ on Jul 29, 2013 12:07 pm • linkreport

Don't the new Bixi docks have a credit card reader on them? Seems like once you sign up for a pass you should just be able to dip at the dock and go.

by MLD on Jul 29, 2013 12:24 pm • linkreport

I don't understand the need for a new code every time, but I think CaBi does this as well. Velib in Paris just issues you a code via email that's good for 24 hours. Having to print out a new code every time is a HUGE waste of paper and probably adds a decent amount of overhead to the system, particularly since the paper has to be replaced occasionally by a human.

Regarding the registration process, I didn't find it any more cumbersome than CaBi, meaning that both are cumbersome (admittedly, I've only used CaBi's daily registration once, since I have a yearly membership, so maybe it has changed). Just let people buy 24 hour passes on the website!

by MM on Jul 29, 2013 12:49 pm • linkreport

I was very excited to utilize Citibike on a trip to NYC last week but I left a little disappointed because of the software glitches enumerated in the article.

Out of the seven separate trips I attempted to take over a 48-hour period, I was only able to complete four of them. The major problem was that when I attempted to insert my credit card to get a new code, nothing happened. The screen didn't indicate there was an error but it continued, frozen, asking me to please insert my credit card. I thought it was my card at first but I was always able to print out my trip receipts just fine. I always tried about 5-7 times (canceling and re-going through the steps) and four times I ended up eventually getting a code. The other times (after trying at multiple stations), I just gave up. Their customer service line was not super helpful though they were able to extend my 24-hour pass to 48-hours which made the $10 cost and all the issues somewhat bearable.

Besides fixing the obvious software glitches, there seem to be two solutions to the long line issues. The best would be to use the app to generate a new code (as well as purchase the membership in the first place). The other is to install a secondary card reader on the side of the machine that simply prints out a new code. The Paris Vélib’ system has the secondary card reader and already allows you to purchase a 24-hour pass online (not to mention that it's far cheaper at 1,70 €).

All in all, excited for the future of Citibike but there are a lot of improvements to be made.

by Jeremy on Jul 29, 2013 1:10 pm • linkreport

I don't understand the need for a new code every time,

It keeps you from sharing the code with a friend. A 24 hour code would invite abuse.

by David C on Jul 29, 2013 1:56 pm • linkreport

JJJJJJ, CaBi has added about 40 stations since April 1.

http://www.cabitracker.com/status_history.php?d1=2013-07-01&d2=2013-01-01

by David C on Jul 29, 2013 2:00 pm • linkreport

It keeps you from sharing the code with a friend. A 24 hour code would invite abuse.

Weird, one would think it would work the same way as with the annual key - once that account has a bike out, it is locked from renting another.

by MLD on Jul 29, 2013 2:31 pm • linkreport

MLD. Right. But what if you're only going to use the bike for a little in the morning. But you know you'll be busy all afternoon. You could let a friend "borrow" your code during that time.

Heck, a clever entrepreneur could probably create an iPhone app and marketplace to let you "rent" your code for those times when you aren't using it. Making you log in at a station for a code that is only useful for a few minutes prevents that.

Also the machines only have like 3 numbers on it. So a unique code for each person each day would have to be pretty long.

by David C on Jul 29, 2013 2:41 pm • linkreport

@David,

Velib works just fine without the need for new codes every ride....also, uou can abuse a key the same way you can abuse the daily code, so I can't imagine that's the reasoning behind it. Also, there's a disincentive to that kind of abuse already built into the system: the fee for rentals longer than 30 minutes. I'm not giving out my code or my key, because it's my credit card getting charged if someone keeps the bike out for too long. No way am I going to entrust that to some random person.

by MM on Jul 29, 2013 2:53 pm • linkreport

I don't see why they make everyone physically interact with a kiosk. Let people with smartphones pay for and get their codes online.

by Chris S. on Jul 29, 2013 2:55 pm • linkreport

You could theoretically even request/distribute codes via SMS. No smartphone required.

by andrew on Jul 29, 2013 3:03 pm • linkreport

Exactly.

by Chris S. on Jul 29, 2013 3:09 pm • linkreport

Velib works just fine without the need for new codes every ride

Yeah, but they're an older system. This is a problem they noticed and so the bikes CaBi used were designed to address it.

You can abuse a key the same way you can abuse the daily code,

You can abuse it, but not in the same way. I can't share a key via email or over the phone. I can't make an infinite number of copies of it. If someone loses the one I lent them, then I don't have a key anymore - unlike with a code.

True the 30 minute limit is a deterrent, but not as good a one as the 15 minute, site-specific code.

I can't imagine that's the reasoning behind it.

Ok, but regardless of the limits of your imagination, that's the reason. I heard it from DDOT's CaBi manager.

by David C on Jul 29, 2013 3:22 pm • linkreport

I don't see why they make everyone physically interact with a kiosk. Let people with smartphones pay for and get their codes online.

Probably because the technology is older than the smartphone and they just haven't updated it yet.

by David C on Jul 29, 2013 3:24 pm • linkreport

@David C "Probably because the technology is older than the smartphone and they just haven't updated it yet."

Probably so, but they really need to catch up with 2013.

by Chris S. on Jul 29, 2013 3:48 pm • linkreport

I cant see sharing codes as a problem. Who wants to share out a code and hope their friend doesnt rack up charges or surprise you with a $1,000 unreturned bike fee?

Theres too much risk.

by JJJJJJ on Jul 29, 2013 4:07 pm • linkreport

I don't know, but key sharing is enough of an issue that CaBi has a warning not to do it on their website.

http://www.capitalbikeshare.com/faq#lend_key

by David C on Jul 29, 2013 4:15 pm • linkreport

Same glitches here, although strangely only when I first was trying to get a bike. I probably spent 20 minutes to get the first one, but from there on out my weekend went smoothly. Even got to play around with the languages some.

@MLD: Nope, the card-sized slots are for RFID/NFC cards (the same as the contactless CaBi key, just in a card format), not mag-stripe cards. In theory, you could use an RFID enabled credit card. So far, no Bixi systems use card-sized keys, but I thought I saw something about Vancouver specifying that their 2014 bike share launch should accept transit cards for payment.

by Payton on Jul 29, 2013 4:23 pm • linkreport

"JJJJJJ, CaBi has added about 40 stations since April 1."

David C, that includes the Arlington expansion, right? Considering CaBi was initially supposed to roll out 54 new stations in the District alone by the end of 2012, then supposedly by March, then supposedly 6-8 per week, the delays and lack of information about what's driving them is frustrating to say the least. Given weekend availability issues at nearby docks, I'll have to think about whether to renew this year, and I've been a big CaBi booster from the start. Too bad.

by Dno on Jul 29, 2013 4:28 pm • linkreport

They should have piloted the program in a small section of the city before rolling it out on such a massive scale with all the glitches. First impressions are huge and difficult to overcome.

by Falls Church on Jul 29, 2013 4:51 pm • linkreport

Based on my experience with the system, the remaining bugs seem to primarily be centered on the day/weekly passes. I've had a yearly membership, which gets you a RFID keyfob, since day one. The first two weeks were very rough, but since then I haven't had any significant issues other than the occasional dock that refuses to lock on the first try.

by Mike on Jul 29, 2013 5:54 pm • linkreport

I too had many problems with the citibike stations and was quite surprised, since the DC stations work great. Hope they get the bugs worked out.

by asfdfsadfasf on Jul 29, 2013 6:46 pm • linkreport

I don't know about all the CaBi but they added on on 3rd and Penn SE right next to the Library of Congress which was a surprise to me.

by ET on Jul 29, 2013 9:17 pm • linkreport

What's wrong with sharing your 24 hour code with a friend? You've paid for the 24 hours of usage?

by neutrino on Jul 30, 2013 4:42 am • linkreport

Like Mike, I'm an annual member of Citibike. I haven't had any problems using the fob.

In DC (where I live part time) I ride my own bike and/or walk when I'm downtown. But Citibike has been so great for me--I am lucky in that my neighborhood, and most of my destinations, are very well-served--I want to give CaBi a go.

by Linda on Jul 30, 2013 8:10 am • linkreport

@neutrino: mostly liability, since your friend hasn't "signed" the rental agreement: same reason why car rental companies make you pay a fee and check the license of each additional driver. Also, your friend should pay a separate access fee (a line has to be drawn *somewhere*), and you probably shouldn't be letting other people run around with your credit card, anyhow.

by Payton on Jul 30, 2013 8:54 am • linkreport

neutrino, also, it's their business plan. They want to get money from each user. If that bothers you then don't use their service. But when you agree to not share your key or your access number - and then you do it anyway - you're violating a contract (and breaking a promise). In some places in the world, that's still wrong.

by David C on Jul 30, 2013 9:15 am • linkreport

David C, problem with that "oh no you broke a contract!" talk is that theyre breaking the contract with you when you cant get a bike when the stations break. Its a two way street.

by JJJJJJ on Jul 30, 2013 9:54 am • linkreport

Just out of curiosity, does anyone know if annual members of Citibike are running into glitches? They receive a key which lets them go up to any bike and take it out without having to deal with the kiosks. How are they fairing?

by Gerald F on Jul 30, 2013 9:55 am • linkreport

" But when you agree to not share your key or your access number - and then you do it anyway - you're violating a contract (and breaking a promise). In some places in the world, that's still wrong"

lending a key to someone for a trip they wouldn't otherwise take, at a non peak time, is to contract breaking, as treating a stop sign as a yield sign while on a bike is to traffic violations.

IE its something where most people will substitute their own judgement of the social costs and benefits for the letter of the law. And where, as long as it creates no significant problems, no one really cares.

The code which can be distributed so much more easily raises other issues than the key. Its like the difference between "game piracy" as in letting your pal borrow your disk to make a copy for themselves, and uploading a copy of a game or music for thousands to copy. One could be ignored, the other could not be.

by SensibleScofflaws on Jul 30, 2013 10:01 am • linkreport

It's not wrong to break a contract. There are simply consequences for doing so. Honestly, I have no qualms with letting my wife or my brother borrow my BikeShare key and if they wish to lose a subscriber over it then that is their prerogative.

by neutrino on Jul 30, 2013 10:33 am • linkreport

Jjjjj, I'm confident the contract doesn't come with a guarantee of bike availability. Perhaps you can show me where?

by David C on Jul 30, 2013 11:20 am • linkreport

And where, as long as it creates no significant problems, no one really cares<\i>

Well, I'm not sure how often the scenario you've described is played out, but I suspect CaBi cares, since they have to pay to rebalance the system and for wear and tear. I care about people using the system for free.

by David C on Jul 30, 2013 11:49 am • linkreport

It's not wrong to break a contract<\i>
For some people their word is their bond and breaking that would be wrong. For others, it doesn't matter. I'm not going to argue the semantics or ethics with you.

by David C on Jul 30, 2013 11:53 am • linkreport

David C

Maybe. I know a friend of mine offered to let me borrow his key, just so I could take a bike out at lunchtime to try out the system. I never did take him up on it, and still do not belong. It would have been useful marketing. Is there any evidence CaBi is cracking down on key sharing (as opposed to code sharing)? If there is, that would show CaBi cares. I suspect that they are willing to live with the maintenance and the incremental balancing (which conceivably could be zero, if borrowers have different usage patterns than other users) in exchange for the marketing - but of course they can't advertise that they are okay with it.

by SensibleScofflaws on Jul 30, 2013 11:56 am • linkreport

"It's not wrong to break a contract<\i>
For some people their word is their bond and breaking that would be wrong. For others, it doesn't matter. I'm not going to argue the semantics or ethics with you. "

Ditto for abiding with all laws.

The ethical reason for keeping a contract or obeying a law that even when the social utility is negative, is the categorical imperative. If we all lie when its convenient, who will ever believe anything.

One can judge that breaking a trivial aspect of a contract, in a way that does no harm to the other party, cannot be generalized in such a way as to make it impossible to enter into contracts. Just as breaking an irrational law in only a sensible way, does not lead to the end of the rule of law.

One might also note that in the case of a monopolist, where there is no option to contract differently with another counter party, the ethical issues are different. A bike sharing system with docks is (unlike day rentals, or perhaps dockless bike sharing) a natural monopoly. That raises issues of what to do when offered a contract with an unreasonable clause.

by SensibleScofflaws on Jul 30, 2013 12:02 pm • linkreport

Different topic, but I'd be interested to hear where the admirably law-abiding commenters stand on sharing music files.

by Chris S. on Jul 30, 2013 12:32 pm • linkreport

What's wrong with sharing your 24 hour code with a friend? You've paid for the 24 hours of usage?

I guess I should start out by saying you might be asking the wrong question here. What's wrong involves an answer of ethics and that's a personal question. I can't really answer that for you. You should have asked why CaBi doesn't want you to do that, and for that the answer is that it will cut into their revenue. They're trying to provide greater mobility at the lowest reasonable cost, and allowing people to ride free drives up the cost more than it improves mobility.

But to answer the question you asked, let's start with the fact that you paid for unlimited use FOR YOU, not for anyone and everyone you might want to allow to use it. So your premise is wrong.

As an illustration, I'll point out that this is a little like buying a soda at a fast food joint with an unlimited refills. Would it be wrong to buy one soda and share it with your spouse, getting multiple refills for the two of you? Would it be wrong to buy one soda for your table of 4 and all drink out of that cup getting as many refills as the table wanted? Would it be wrong for your entire rugby team to get one soda and drink off of it for hours? Would it be wrong for you to sell soda to people waiting in line, getting refills from the machine to maintain your supply? I mean, what's wrong with sharing your soda, you paid for unlimited refills?

I think most people would view all of these scenarios as wrong. I do. If you don't then we just have different values, so, like I said, it may be the wrong question to ask.

Honestly, I have no qualms with letting my wife or my brother borrow my BikeShare key

OK, but again, that's not what you bought. You may have no qualms with allowing them to have something that no one paid for, but that's really about you. In my opinion, if you like the program and you both use it, the cool thing to do is to support it by both being members. We're talking about $75 (or less) here.

Is there any evidence CaBi is cracking down on key sharing (as opposed to code sharing)?

Nope. But it is against their rules. So I don't know why it matters.

Ditto for abiding with all laws.

I would say that signing a contract is more proactive than living someplace with laws.

One can judge that breaking a trivial aspect of a contract, in a way that does no harm to the other party...

There's the rub. It does harm CaBi. It increases their costs, just as sharing your refillable soda cup increases costs to the fast food joint.

...cannot be generalized in such a way as to make it impossible to enter into contracts.

I never claimed it did. I claimed it was wrong.

bike sharing system with docks is (unlike day rentals, or perhaps dockless bike sharing) a natural monopoly.

Anyone who wants to set up a competing bike-share system in DC is free to do so. And bike-share users are free to use other bikes, rent bikes and use a host of other transportation systems. I don't think this constitutes a monopoly at all.

That raises issues of what to do when offered a contract with an unreasonable clause.

Well, there's nothing unreasonable about the clause, and the answer is to not sign up for bikeshare as most people in DC have chosen to do (and as everyone did before 2008).

I'd be interested to hear where the admirably law-abiding commenters stand on sharing music files.

Perhaps I just knew too many struggling musicians in Austin, or maybe my brief stint as a professional entertainer warps my judgement, but I think it's wrong except in those cases where musicians have given permission. [Though I do think copyrights have been extended way too long for the public good, but that's a different subject and no excuse]. However, I think it's less wrong. You're keeping money out of the musicians' pocket, same as not buying a key; but you're not taking money out of their pocket as you do when you use bikeshare without paying for it. The musician will not have to pay to maintain their music. In addition, there's some indication that it also increases concert going and the purchase of things like t-shirts. Still, it's wrong and I don't do it. And I don't buy pirated DVDs for the same reason.

by David C on Jul 30, 2013 3:49 pm • linkreport

The reason it matters is this that I suggested its like Idaho stops in that no one cares, and you suggested CaBi does. I am skeptical that they do. I know if they've lost revenue (cause I know if my ride as a borrower was a substitute for paying or not) and I suppose I could make sure to only take out a bike at an almost full station - hence no rebalancing. That would leave only the small cost for maintenance. I suspect in that instance, if the ride is a test ride, to see if I like it, CaBi may really, really not only not care, but may be happy about it (but of course they can't suggest key sharing is a good idea, as it really would be abused)

I would also suggest (as you hinted earlier) that there are natural limits to key sharing.

I also think you may be confused as to what a natural monopoly is. Sure anyone can set up a network of bike stations, but the fixed costs are quite high (as we have discussed here before). So much so that it will rarely be economical to have two competing systems.

That may be less true for dockless bike share systems, and of course its not at all true for traditional bike rentals. But those are fundamentally different services than bike sharing with a dock. (and BTW, I am not aware of any dockless systems successfully operating in places that have dock systems, though I am sure there must be some somewhere)

as for the soda, I would say it some different - someone who has never tried a flavor of soda, and takes advantage of the free refill policy to try it for free, is doing a taste test for the soft drink maker, NOT for the restaurant. So there is no marketing gain to them. In the case of bike share, if the tester converts to a buyer, the benefit DOES flow to CaBi, and not just to say Bixi. The better analogy would be to certain game companies (a minority to be sure) who don't come down too hard on piracy, on the belief that many pirates do convert to buyers.

by SensibleScofflaw on Jul 30, 2013 4:08 pm • linkreport

to clarify

That there are competing products does not nullify that something is a monopoly, either in antitrust law, in the econ literature, or in common usage. When JD rockefeller established an oil monopoly, there were many other sources of energy in use. The existence of the US mail did not avert the antitrust case against ATT. Over broad definitions of markets would mean there are NO monopolies - but that is not realistically the case.

And I would argue from the ethical POV in this instance, thats relevant.

by SensibleScofflaw on Jul 30, 2013 4:15 pm • linkreport

The reason it matters is this that I suggested its like Idaho stops in that no one cares, and you suggested CaBi does.

Or it could mean the barriers to enforcement are really high.

if the ride is a test ride

They probably don't care. But that was not what I was talking about.

And I would argue from the ethical POV in this instance, thats relevant.

I disagree. The requirement is by no means onerous. It is totally reasonable and pretty standard to limit "unlimited" use to the person who is buying it (see unlimited soda). So whether or not CaBi is a natural monopoly (which it isn't) is totally irrelevant. It doesn't make it ethical to ignore the terms of your agreement - especially in a way that harms them. I am not talking about the special case where you let someone test ride a bike (which shouldn't even require taking it for very long or going from one station to another).

by David C on Jul 30, 2013 4:39 pm • linkreport

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_monopoly

CaBi is definitely a natural monopoly.

I agree the requirement is not onerous, and so would not justify regular violation of it. But there may be instances where an individual can judge that the social utility of the violation is high, and the cost to CaBi is trivial. In that case, I would feel no guilt about violating the provision.

by SensibleScofflaw on Jul 30, 2013 4:46 pm • linkreport

that the barriers to enforcement are high would mean little enforcement, but other evidence that CaBi cares could still be presented - like statements from them.

by SensibleScofflaw on Jul 30, 2013 4:48 pm • linkreport

Given weekend availability issues at nearby docks, I'll have to think about whether to renew this year, and I've been a big CaBi booster from the start.

Can't please everyone. Enjoy your time on the bus.

but other evidence that CaBi cares could still be presented - like statements from them

It could. Why don't you call them and ask.

by David C on Jul 30, 2013 4:52 pm • linkreport

Obviously they cannot give their permission. Then no one would obey the rule.

The point here is that there can be a rule that is good, that is not unjust, but there may be occasions where violating it is not unethical. In that case changing the rule is not the right thing - but violating it is.

by SensibleScofflaw on Jul 30, 2013 4:59 pm • linkreport

Whatever. I'm not talking about the trivial cases. I'm trying to talk about in general. And in general, it is unethical to share your key.

by David C on Jul 30, 2013 5:20 pm • linkreport

"Can't please everyone."

No you can't, but I don't think it's too much to ask why the expansion is half complete and yet 8 months behind schedule (and counting). Was hoping CaBi would a more accountable government entity and at least describe whateever the issues are that are impeding them from meeting their objectives.

"Enjoy your time on the bus."

Well, I've got a few personal bikes and a scooter so I won't be bussing. Still, I really like bikeshare in concept and hope CaBi will be more responsive to customers than WMATA is or David C suggests.

by Dno on Jul 30, 2013 5:24 pm • linkreport

Sorry about the typos above - tapping this out on my phone.

by Dno on Jul 30, 2013 5:26 pm • linkreport

One can still realize the unethical action and choose to proceed anyway.

by drumz on Jul 30, 2013 6:03 pm • linkreport

"I don't think it's too much to ask why the expansion is half complete and yet 8 months behind schedule (and counting)"

Ok. Have you asked anyone? At CaBi? At DDOT?

by David C on Jul 30, 2013 8:03 pm • linkreport

While I'm at it, they announced 54 stations by the end of winter. So that puts them 5 months behind. I'm not sure how many of those they've installed, but there were 2 more today.

by David C on Jul 30, 2013 9:20 pm • linkreport

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