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Having pets doesn't mean having a car

If you don't have a car or don't want to drive all the time, taking care of a pet can seem cumbersome. But transporting a small or medium pet without a car is easier than it sounds. As the proud servant to an 18-pound dog, I've learned how to take him around DC without a car.


Photo by jasmined on Flickr.

Of course, you can walk or bike to your destination with your furry friend in tow. But dogs, cats, and other small animals are also permitted in most taxis, Metro trains and buses, and Zipcars. Most of them require that you take your pet in a secure carrier.

I have a soft-sided airline on-board carrier for my dog, since I can use the carrier for anything and it has a shoulder strap for easy carrying. A hard-sided carrier would be difficult to manage with anything but very small pets, but is also a great multi-tasking option for very small dogs, kitties, lizards, snakes, and the like. There are even wheeled carriers now, some of which have backpack-like straps, that would be ideal for medium-size dogs that may be hard to lift or transport otherwise.

Metro may have the simplest rules for pets. WMATA allows animals on all trains and buses so long as they are contained in a secure carrier, except service animals. I take my dog in his carrier on the bus or train with some regularity. Some passengers object that I'm not allowed to bring my dog on board, but bus drivers and station managers always know that he is welcome and let others know the rules.

Zipcar rules are also straightforward: pets are fine so long as they're in a secure carrier. I know it's tempting to ignore this rule and just load your pet up without a carrier, but those of us with allergies thank you for following the rules. I am very allergic to most dogs and all cats, and spending time in a car with lingering pet dander would be a miserable experience for me.

Despite my dog being low-allergy, I still crate him if I'm using Zipcar to take him to the groomer, vet, or somewhere else. There's an off-chance that someone who uses the car after me might be so sensitive to pet dander that even my dog would bother them, and that is the spirit of the rule. Zipcar is also a decent option for transporting larger pets. Given a large enough vehicle to accommodate an appropriate crate, larger dogs are free to cruise.

Taxis are a bit more complicated. Of course, service animals are still permitted, but taxi drivers can refuse to take non-service animals. Title 31, Section 801.9(b)(1), (2), and (4) of the DC Municipal Regulations require passengers to bring pets in a secure carrier, but also allow cab drivers to reject a non-service animal if they have a medical condition, such as allergies.

When requesting a taxi, I always let the dispatcher know I will have a dog in a carrier with me. I've only once had a problem with this, at National Airport, which is not subject to DC regulations. A driver told me that I'd have to put my dog in the trunk or take another cab, but rather than objecting, I opted to just take a different taxi. Thankfully, the staff member handling the taxi line was able to get me a taxi driver happy to transport my crated dog promptly.

In some situations, you may need to street hail a cab with your pet. In order to refuse you, the cab drive must have a placard in the taxi saying they have an exemption. I sometimes take my dog in Uber sedans, and I've always followed their advice and called the driver as soon as he accepts the fare and let him know I have a dog in a carrier. I've never had an Uber driver refuse service on that basis, though the drivers do sometimes ask how big he is, so you may encounter problems with larger dogs.

There are also several pet taxi services in DC that can take your pet (with or without you) to vet or groomer's appointments or wherever else they need to go. These are the best option for folks with larger animals, as the vehicles are designed for pets and often don't require a crate. They are more expensive than regular cabs, but likely cheaper than owning a car, particularly if you don't need to regularly transport your pet by vehicle or your pet is small enough to take on the Metro.

Managing a pet without a car does present some challenges, but DC has resources to take your pet by public transportation, carshare, or hired vehicles. With the right equipment and knowledge, you can take great care of your pet without driving everywhere.

Toni Dach is an analyst for the Department of Commerce. She moved to DC after completing her Master's degree in 2007, and has lived in Brentwood since 2009. 

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Good points, though I'm not sure abut the biking with the pet thing.

by Crickey7 on Aug 29, 2013 11:08 am • linkreport

"Zipcar rules are also straightforward: pets are fine so long as they're in a secure carrier. I know it's tempting to ignore this rule and just load your pet up without a carrier, but those of us with allergies thank you for following the rules. I am very allergic to most dogs and all cats, and spending time in a car with lingering pet dander would be a miserable experience for me."
AMEN! It drives me crazy whenever I get into a rental car and find that a previous driver has been inconsiderate enough to let their dog ride shotgun, leaving me to suffer the consequences. This should be better enforced, IMO.

by Chris on Aug 29, 2013 11:10 am • linkreport

I live in Capitol Hill in easy walking distance of Union Vet. In the rare instances I've needed to take a pet to Friendship in an emergency situation, I've taken cabs. This has only ever happened with the cat. Cab drivers have never seemed to mind taking me with a cat in a carrier. I don't have a carrier for my dog right now, so I should definitely pick one up before the need becomes urgent.

by Lucre on Aug 29, 2013 11:20 am • linkreport

@Crickey--

Crazy as it sounds (and trust me, I know how crazy it sounds), my cat has only ever been around by bike. I only need to transport her for vet appointments, though, so it's been very infrequent over the past 2 years I've had her.

I have a large rear basket (the size of a grocery basket) on my bike. I put her in a soft-sided carrier, put the carrier in the basket (fits perfectly), cover the whole thing with a thick blanket for warmth/to muffle street noises/generally avoid overstimulation. The vet is about a 10 minute ride away and she's perfectly fine with this setup. Once, when she was a kitten, she even fell asleep during the ride.

They also make purpose-made pet baskets for bikes--mostly seem to be aimed at the small dog set, and I would not trust my cat to not jump out while moving (she's....special). Large dogs could be a real problem. But I wouldn't be above getting a child trailer for a dog!

by Catherine on Aug 29, 2013 11:26 am • linkreport

Once when waiting for the previous zipcar reservation to return, the driver pulled up in the car I was waiting for with a massive dog running around the car. It was a shaggy one and there was hair everywhere.

I promptly reported that to zipcar, my only question is does zipcar really go and fine the next person? (Which I'm totally fine with)

by Ryan on Aug 29, 2013 11:34 am • linkreport

I got a used Burley child bike trailer on sale at REI and put my 35 pound dog into it on occasion. We also have a car and default to that for trips to the vet, etc., but the bike cart is really nice for taking her downtown for the day, or to a picnic--places where we don't have time pressure and/or don't want to deal with parking. She gets the child seatbelts strapped through her harness for safety and so she doesn't jump out. She's not thrilled about the arrangement but she tolerates it pretty well, especially when she gets treats at stoplights!

by Kava on Aug 29, 2013 11:41 am • linkreport

Do bus drivers know that pets are allowed?

Granted, this isn't Metro, but a few years back I was riding a circulator bus and a couple had two cats with them secured in enclosed travel bags--the kind of thing you'd see on a plane. It was pretty hysterical because the cats were meowing quite loudly and their bags were sliding around as the bus moved.

After a few stops the bus driver heard the meowing (or someone complained) and freaked out and ordered them off the bus immediately.

Again, not Metro but seeing the Circulator is integrated within the larger Metro system fare-wise you would think the rules for this would be the same? Or is that a stupid question?

by dl on Aug 29, 2013 11:47 am • linkreport

While not exactly on-topic, many people are happy with home visit vets, and sometimes their pets seem to prefer it to going into the vet's office.

by OtherMike on Aug 29, 2013 11:59 am • linkreport

@Crikey & Catherine,

I was more referring to using a waist leash to have the dog run along side you while biking. Obviously that's not an option if you're speeding along, or using an on-street bike lane or cycletrack, and requires extensive training. However, my dog walker regularly bikes with her dogs, and some of her clients, in this manner. It's more an option for recreation/exercise than anything else, but, if my dog were trained for it, I could see walking to the MBT and biking the trail with a waist leash to get to various destinations nearby the trail. Unfortunately, my dog is also "special" ("SQUIRREL!"), so I don't see that happening.

But you make a good point about using a carrier on a bike. Sure, a child carrier would work for a larger dog, and the small-pet set has numerous options. I-Go2 makes a number of "convertible" carriers, which usually have wheels and backpack straps. They have several different options to carry pets up to 25 pounds. One of these is actually on my wish list.

by Toni on Aug 29, 2013 12:00 pm • linkreport

Some WMATA buses have signage that says animals are not permitted on board. Also, I was once asked to get off a bus when carrying my cat home from the vet (in a proper carrier). I'm not sure the policy is always consistent.

by Brian on Aug 29, 2013 12:29 pm • linkreport

@OtherMike, I began using a home visit vet when I moved into the District a few years ago and it works well -- but if the pet needs any testing done, then they need to be taken into the clinic that the vet is affiliated with anyway. I've found that cabs don't mind if I have one cat in a carrier with me.

by DC_Chica on Aug 29, 2013 1:07 pm • linkreport

The problem is that a significant portion of WMATA employees do not know the rules about bringing a pet in a carrier on Metro. Nearly every time I get on with my 35 lbs crated dog who never makes a peep, I am stopped by an employee informing me that only service animals are permitted. (My crate is FAA approved for the record.) My response is always to please call their supervisor. Most don't have radios though, so it requires a lot of waiting.

In fact, the weekend before last on the way home from the vet, the bus driver refused to move the bus until she checked with her supervisor. After five minutes of waiting, I stepped off the bus rather than keep a full busload of passengers from getting to work on time and boarded the next bus operated by a driver who fortunately knew the rules.

by Jeff on Aug 29, 2013 1:12 pm • linkreport

@DC_Chica, A friend of mine who doesn't drive said that her home visit vet will handle transport when testing needed to be done elsewhere. They might not all offer that service. However, in an emergency, I drove her with her large dog to the emergency room at Friendship.

by OtherMike on Aug 29, 2013 1:33 pm • linkreport

For the clueless Metro workers, I would just bring with me a copy of Metro's rules, which are on the website.

by JDC Esq on Aug 29, 2013 1:42 pm • linkreport

DC should join more progressive cities like Boston and Paris where pets are allowed on transit vehicles without the need of burdensome crates.

"Bu bu bu (hypothetical reason why that doesnt work"

Right. Except it works just fine in most cities around the world. DC isn't a special pumpkin where it wouldn't work.

by JJJJ on Aug 29, 2013 2:03 pm • linkreport

"DC should join more progressive cities like Boston and Paris where pets are allowed on transit vehicles without the need of burdensome crates."

No.

I have had too many experiences with unleashed misbehaving dogs at public parks (where dogs are supposed to be leashed - not at dog parks) to trust people to be reasonable about this. I've had dogs run up and jump on me, run over to lick my face, and once a dog ran over and peed on my bag. The owner just apologized awkwardly and walked away (without leashing his dog). I can avoid that particular public park where dog owners feel that they are above common courtesy, but I take the bus and metro almost every day and really don't want to have to fend off a misbehaving dog that the owner feels is "just being friendly" on my morning commute. Not to mention allergy issues in confined spaces.

by MetMet on Aug 29, 2013 2:16 pm • linkreport

DC should join more progressive cities like Boston and Paris where pets are allowed on transit vehicles without the need of burdensome crates.

I bet this sounds like a reasonable idea if you're living in Spring Valley. I know a guy a few blocks away who walks a couple of 70 lb un-neutered pit bulls on makeshift leashes. If I see them coming, I usually cross the street. Would be fun on a crowded bus.

by oboe on Aug 29, 2013 2:30 pm • linkreport

No mention of bikes!

When my sister's Yorkie lived with me, I could just put him in a backpack with the lid open and he'd poke his head out while riding on my back. But if you really want to stay non-motorized and expand your dog-portaging radius, you need one of these:

http://www.amazon.com/Aosom-Elite-Bike-Carrier-Trailer/dp/B005CRZDQ2/

by Will on Aug 29, 2013 4:05 pm • linkreport

How far can one lug around a 150 lb dog in a secure carrier? That sounds like a tough slog to me.

by Chris S. on Aug 29, 2013 5:55 pm • linkreport

@oboe -in cities where dogs are allowed uncrated on buses and trains they are required to be muzzled for the duration of the ride. I think this is very reasonable and civilized.

However the metal slats on the escalator are hazardous to dogs feet; their pads get cut on the metal edges and stuck in the grooves and can be badly injured. For this reason London requires dogs to be carried on escalators.

by Tina on Aug 29, 2013 6:06 pm • linkreport

The vast majority of pet owners do not own 150 pound dogs, but some of these ideas work just fine for large dogs.

For example, in an SUV or minivan from Zipcar, one could easily use a crate to secure a large dog. I have a folding wire crate for household use that I could use for longer trips via Zipcar. I could pick the car up, go home and load the crate and dog and reverse to return home.

Pet taxis also provide an option for larger pets.

And the bike carrier linked to by Will has a maximum capacity of 99 pounds.

Larger pets obviously present a greater hurdle, but it's surmountable should one desire to do so. Just presenting some options to those who feel their pet's needs require a car, or their lack of a car precludes owning a pet.

by Toni on Aug 29, 2013 6:42 pm • linkreport

I hesitated to bring up the cities that allow dogs uncrated on public transit because it is controversial. However, I have lived in Boston, and it seems to work fine there. Pets must be leashed and are prohibited during rush hours. Of course the major difference for DC is the carpet in the cars. I don't see a leashed, uncrated dog policy getting any traction until the carpet is 100 percent gone. Even then, I'd probably still crate, since even in his crate, my dog has attracted some attention from children. He likes kids and is very tolerant of them, but it only takes ticking off one parent who doesn't want their kid near the dog to cause a confrontation.

by Toni on Aug 29, 2013 6:54 pm • linkreport

How can we get Amtrak to allow the same pet policy?

by Xavier on Aug 29, 2013 6:59 pm • linkreport

yes, being able to travel by Amtrak with a pet would be wonderful

by Tina on Aug 29, 2013 7:03 pm • linkreport

dl, yes, pets are allowed on Circulator under the same rules as Metro (http://www.dccirculator.com/Home/FAQs.aspx). I'm disheartened to hear so many people have had trouble with Metro/Circulator. Granted, we all have our routes and stations we frequent, so I expected that not *every* staff member would know the rules, but I've encountered so many that do that I assumed staff that didn't know the rules were infrequent. Hopefully some publicity (and possibly having those FAQ pages handy if you encounter a staff member that doesn't know your pet is allowed) will help.

by Toni on Aug 29, 2013 7:20 pm • linkreport

We at Dog Paws n' Cat Claws provide Pet Taxi Service as low as $15 but no more than $35 an hour. I have driven a woman who was pet sitting from her apt in South Arlington to her friends place off of H st. and it was a very nice time and she was very happy with our service.

by Jay Wasserman on Aug 29, 2013 7:24 pm • linkreport

We took a bus to an area in Arlington to adopt our dog last year. We checked the metro rules to make sure we could bring her back via bus and train, but the driver didn't let us on. As new dog owners, we were too intimidated to argue with her. Our dog was in a small, hard-sided carrier...which we had with us the entire time on the way to get her via train and bus without any issues.

Now, we have a soft-sided carrier. It is much easier to carry, and it looks very similar to a woman's handbag. We never have any issues taking our dog on public transportation, but very few people realize that we're carrying a dog.

by Michelle on Aug 30, 2013 8:49 am • linkreport

Lived for years in the UK without a car and a large (75lb) dog. It was great because he was allowed on the bus and we even took him on the train several times when we went on vacation. He was never muzzled and often he was showered with attention by other passengers and the conductors. His longest ride was over 5 hours on a train. Our vet was within walking distance and, like most of our groceries, we had his food delivered.

by Thad on Aug 30, 2013 8:51 am • linkreport

@Tina,

In cities where dogs are allowed uncrated on buses and trains they are required to be muzzled for the duration of the ride. I think this is very reasonable and civilized.

That sounds reasonable, but I'm skeptical as to how many will comply. Plus inevitably someone like Barry will demand the muzzle requirement be stripped from the bill as it's an unfair burden on working class folks. #thistown

by oboe on Aug 30, 2013 9:29 am • linkreport

@oboe, I guess in places where there is a tradition of peer pressure it works better like in places where you buy your ticket and board and no one checks it, except for the occasional times when a controller boards and checks everyone's ticket.

In Basel Switzerland that was the system. You had to have a ticket for your dog, who had to be muzzled. Dog's ticket was half price, or the same as for a child 12 and under.

by Tina on Aug 30, 2013 9:36 am • linkreport

@ Toni - "Larger pets obviously present a greater hurdle, but it's surmountable should one desire to do so. Just presenting some options to those who feel their pet's needs require a car, or their lack of a car precludes owning a pet."

Sure, I was just saying that best practices for an 18 lb dog may not be widely applicable to the general dog population.

Anyway, you're right that car ownership should not be a factor in dog ownership. Dogs normally don't need to be transported anyway. All they need is to walk around the neighborhood, and occasionally visit the local park and vet, both presumably within walking distance.

by Chris S. on Aug 30, 2013 10:07 am • linkreport

Completely useless article to those of us with medium and large size dogs. It would have to be a pretty big SUV (like an Escalade or Hummer, which zipcar doesn't have) to fit a crate big enough to fit a dog over 50 lbs. This is just another anti-car article from this pro-bike, yuppie site.

by SJ on Aug 30, 2013 4:08 pm • linkreport

@SJ - what?

by Tina on Aug 30, 2013 4:10 pm • linkreport

@Tina, do you need me to translate into another language? This site is very pro-bike and every other article seems to be about bike lanes, which in reality, only yuppie transplants care about that. I see very few articles about the much needed improvements in the bus system or what can be done to reduce traffic congestion along major arteries in the city. The editors and writers of this site need to be honest about the agenda they are pushing and not mask it in fakery.

by SJ on Aug 30, 2013 4:56 pm • linkreport

SJ,

Lol. Ignore the multiple articles posted this week about bus service.

Or the fact that pretty much everyone has a pet. Rich/poor/black/white etc (or rides a bike for that matter).

Or what should go into your decision about what size of dog is appropriate for your lifestyle. (Activity level for a breed is also important to consider as well).

by drumz on Aug 30, 2013 5:13 pm • linkreport

@SJ

This is just another anti-car article from this pro-bike, yuppie site.

Sure, folks in bikes are yuppie elitists, and the folks in the Escalades and Hummers are just the salt of the Earth.

Heh heh.

by oboe on Aug 30, 2013 5:37 pm • linkreport

@drumz the articles about BRT in MoCo? I don't live there so I don't care. There is a significant lack of articles about bus service in DC but soo many about bike lanes which are rarely used. Did I make a comment about certain people having pets? No, I have one. My point is its ridiculous to have an article about transporting a small pet because its easier to to transport and conceal them. I've seen them in the grocery store. The writer should challenge herself a bit more to consider the challenges of medium and large dog owners who live in the city without cars. Don't write another lame, anti-car, uninformative article just to push your agenda.

@oboe yuppie elitist only care about bike lanes. If you don't understand that them you really know anything about poc or urban communities. Sorry that fact challenges your privileged existence.

by SJ on Aug 31, 2013 9:26 am • linkreport

SJ,

Then all I can say is start writing. They will probably publish it as long as its clear and the facts are right.

But still, bus service gets written about a lot. Moreover, based on usage I'd say people of all stripes care about bike lanes. Claiming that bikes are a yuppie concern is low level trolling.

by drumz on Aug 31, 2013 9:45 am • linkreport

@drumz your trolling is my reality, but thanks for the tip.

by SJ on Aug 31, 2013 4:35 pm • linkreport

Well, I'm not really interested in swatting down stereotypes. Rather, what issues do owners of large pets face? Let the yuppies on bikes debate wait until one of the alparenty too numerous bike threads.

by drumz on Aug 31, 2013 6:15 pm • linkreport

And this is why I hesitated to mention how big my dog is so upfront...people don't read and digest the whole thing before saying "nope, won't work" if their dog or any dog they've ever met is even a pound larger. Of course, Metro-ing a large pet is not an option. But please explain to me how Zipcar and pet taxis are not viable options. I have friends with dogs up to 100 pounds, and none of them have or use Hummers or Escalades to transport them. Any mid-size SUV or minivan can accommodate a larger dog (crates for dogs over 100 pounds are smaller than I think you're picturing...the dimensions for up to 110 pounds are 48" L X 30" W X 33" H). Even a hatchback sedan would probably work for a dog 50-70 pounds with the back seats down (36" L X 23" W X 25" H). My dog's "big" household crate only takes up half the backseat of a small sedan, and is actually the one for pets up to 40 pounds (the one for dogs up to 25 was out of stock and I really needed a crate). It's especially easy to put one of these in a car if you get the folding variety, which doesn't demand the door/hatch dimensions fit the open crate (put it in folded and then pop it open...after setting my crate up/tearing it down a few times, I got it down to about a 15 second job).

Good point about the *decision,* drumz. I had already gone car-free when I decided to get a dog. I looked at my home, its location, my lifestyle, and chose a dog that I could properly care for under the circumstances. Not just getting him to the vet (not every neighborhood has one - my vet is Atlas, a short bus ride away, and the closest I could find - and emergencies that require a trip elsewhere can and do happen), but wanting to bring him with me to appropriate locations (rec sports games, restaurants that *welcome* dogs in outdoor areas, etc.), activity level and the space I had to accommodate that, and more.

He's a rescue, BTW, so no need to go shelling out big bucks for a purebred or designer dog...even real cuties (if I do say so myself) with some desirable traits (low-allergy...plus housebroken and with some basic training) are waiting for good homes. You might have to go through a rescue if you're looking for something specific (there are also numerous purebred rescues), but the fee is worth the free vetting you get. For $200, he came to me fixed, UTD on shots, and with a medical eval and health guarantee (they'd pay for any vet needs for the first month). After shelling out for a few illnesses (who knew a simple ear infection was so expensive to treat), that's a solid deal.

by Toni on Sep 2, 2013 3:56 pm • linkreport

[This comment has been deleted for violating the comment policy.]

by Tina on Sep 3, 2013 11:15 am • linkreport

"There is a significant lack of articles about bus service in DC but soo many about bike lanes which are rarely used. "

They are heavily used. If you want to write a piece about local buses in DC, have at it.

"@oboe yuppie elitist only care about bike lanes. If you don't understand that them you really know anything about poc or urban communities. Sorry that fact challenges your privileged existence."

In fairfax county there are lots of working class hispanics who rely on bikes for transportation. There are also middle class african americans who bike for recreation. Do they not count as POC?

And I would suggest most elitists in the region care far more about their BMWs than they do about bike lanes.

by AWalkerInTheCity on Sep 3, 2013 11:21 am • linkreport

@SJ

@oboe yuppie elitist only care about bike lanes. If you don't understand that them you really know anything about poc or urban communities. Sorry that fact challenges your privileged existence.

Two things: First, if you don't realize there are throngs of poor folks riding bicycles in this town, you've either never ventured out of the far Northwest quadrant, or you've got some sort of cognitive blindness. They deserve safety and support as much as your poor Escalade driver.

Second, as someone who has recommended "an Escalade or Hummer" as a viable option for dog owners--as opposed to a municipal bus or a $20 bicycle--I hardly think you're the best qualified to judge what is and what is not "yuppie elitism" or "privilege."

What's next? Critique an article on how poor folks can make their dollar stretch further by eating canned beans because beans are an elitist luxury good, but eating at Morton's Steak House is how real working class folks spend their money?

It is to laugh.

by oboe on Sep 3, 2013 12:10 pm • linkreport

@oboe- ...make their dollar stretch further by eating canned beans... omg you elitist. Dried beans are SO much cheaper than canned beans.

by Tina on Sep 3, 2013 12:17 pm • linkreport

@Tina,

Poor people don't have time to prepare dried beans--soaking, cleaning, etc... If you weren't living in your elitist bubble, you'd know poor folks either heat their canned beans on their Viking ranges or just dump them straight into their Vitamix and puree them.

by oboe on Sep 4, 2013 8:49 am • linkreport

@Toni, the first paragraph of your reply would have been really useful to include in the article.

@AWalkerInTheCity @oboe
What you don't understand is that poor/working class people bike out of necessity. Bike lanes didn't become an issue until DC started to gentrify. Poor/working class people bike because they have to, they take the bus because they have to; I bet if you ask them they would prefer to have a car if they could afford one. This is the crux of the difference. They bike out of necessity, you bike because you want to.

"Second, as someone who has recommended "an Escalade or Hummer" as a viable option for dog owners--as opposed to a municipal bus or a $20 bicycle--I hardly think you're the best qualified to judge what is and what is not "yuppie elitism" or "privilege."

Please go back and reread by post for context. My point was that it's difficult for a medium or large size dog to fit into a crate that can travel on a bus.

"Two things: First, if you don't realize there are throngs of poor folks riding bicycles in this town, you've either never ventured out of the far Northwest quadrant, or you've got some sort of cognitive blindness. They deserve safety and support as much as your poor Escalade driver."

I don't live in NW, but nice try, bro! [Deleted for violating the comment policy.]

by SJ on Sep 5, 2013 1:02 am • linkreport

So only people who bike because they "have to" are qualified to weigh in on bike policy?

A: lol, no
B: this is an auto centric view because it assumes that biking is always a less preferred option to driving.
C: definitely a straw man argument in an article about pets. Large dogs do fce unique challenges but ultimately there is a line somewhere. It may be possible that unless you have a lot of certain things in walking distance a large dog may just not work. But that doesn't mean that parts of the article can't work for many, many other people.

by drumz on Sep 5, 2013 9:51 am • linkreport

What you don't understand is that poor/working class people bike out of necessity. Bike lanes didn't become an issue until DC started to gentrify. Poor/working class people bike because they have to, they take the bus because they have to; I bet if you ask them they would prefer to have a car if they could afford one.

Ah, I get it now: people who "bike out of necessity" don't deserve any sort of protection (e.g. "bike lanes"). Because they'd rather be driving Escalades. Or something.

Much clearer now.

by oboe on Sep 5, 2013 9:58 am • linkreport

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