Greater Greater Washington

What if the new Metro map were to scale?

Graphic designer Peter Dovak has created a geographically accurate version of the new Metro map that WMATA released last week.


Map by Peter Dovak.

Peter's map matches WMATA's style as closely as possible, except it's to scale. It looks stunningly like it could be an actual WMATA-produced map.

While this map is wonderful and fun, it also strongly illustrates why Metro opts for a more abstract official design. There's so much empty white space in the suburbs, and the core is so cluttered, that a less accurate diagram is easier for riders to read.

See more at Peter's website.

Cross-posted at BeyondDC.

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Dan Malouff is a professional transportation planner for Arlington County, but his blog posts represent only his own personal views. He has a degree in Urban Planning from the University of Colorado, and lives car-free in Washington. He runs BeyondDC and contributes to the Washington Post

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Looking at the map this way makes me think we have a convincing reason to expand the Metro system. And then I remember about the quality of the existing system and think, "haha ... no way."

by varun on Sep 18, 2013 12:03 pm • linkreport

CAPTIAL != CAPITOL

Everyone living within 100 miles of the CapitOl rotunda should know this (but really all native English speakers, should, too).

The station is Capitol South. With an O. Because it refers to the building. The Capitol. With an O.

by Matt Johnson on Sep 18, 2013 12:13 pm • linkreport

But I do love the maps. They're very well done, except for the aforementioned typo.

by Matt Johnson on Sep 18, 2013 12:13 pm • linkreport

Agreed, I love the geographically correct Metro maps. I used to have an atlas that the Journal newspapers put out 20 years ago that had a similar one of the system to that time, and always thought it looked neat. (Though I still think the funky artsy ones that Metro actually uses should stay, because they're easier to read)

by NatsFanY2K on Sep 18, 2013 12:18 pm • linkreport

The map will look much more sensible when we can finally show the Purple Line alignment across the top of the map, connecting the red, green and orange lines.

by Wayne Phyillaier on Sep 18, 2013 12:19 pm • linkreport

It shouldn't be an 'OR" situation.

Metro stations arent lacking in space. No reason not to include both (and a 3rd, hyper-local map)

by JJJJ on Sep 18, 2013 12:21 pm • linkreport

I loaded up the GIS data set for metro from the DC GIS clearinghouse a couple of years ago and I was slightly surprised at how far flung some of the suburban stations are vs the official map. Obviously the Silver Line is now eclipsing even the Red Line.

by BTA on Sep 18, 2013 12:22 pm • linkreport

@Matt Johnson: Also, Captial != Capital

by Gray on Sep 18, 2013 12:25 pm • linkreport

@Matt Johnson

D'oh! I completely bungled that. Thank you for correcting, I shall quickly update it on my site.

(I'm embarrassed at how many typos were in there before folks pointed it out. Curse you, Wiehle-Reston East!)

by pdovak on Sep 18, 2013 12:27 pm • linkreport

It will also look better when the DC streetcar lines go in and provide some decent connections outside of downtown.

by BTA on Sep 18, 2013 12:31 pm • linkreport

Check out the link to the original site. There are some cool zoom-ins. Seeing the core stations version makes me realize that the Waterfront station on the current map is near the wrong water. It should be on the channel but instead it's closer to the Anacostia.

by recyclist on Sep 18, 2013 12:50 pm • linkreport

People interested in to scale subway maps should check out this link of networks around the world.

http://fakeisthenewreal.org/subway/large/

Sadly it has not been updated recently to include the drastic changes in Delhi and Beijing for example.

by Richard B on Sep 18, 2013 12:54 pm • linkreport

@ varun Looking at this map confirms that WMATA Rail has ventured into territory better served by commuter rails. How long, in terms of how-the-crow-flies and actual rail, is that gap between Spring Hill and Wiehle?

by Non LTR on Sep 18, 2013 12:57 pm • linkreport

@Non LTR

YES. Why don't more people realize this? Anything outside of DC and Arlington should really be commuter rail, and we should have a much more extensive system in the core. Metro has really done as much to encourage sprawl as the Beltway or the Dulles Toll Road.

by Eponymous on Sep 18, 2013 1:05 pm • linkreport

Richard B, that is a very interesting global scale comparison. I can't speak to most of those cities but I can point out that in Barcelona (where I lived for 3.5 years) regional trains (known as FFCC) are seamlessly integrated into the metro system in many places and are used to get around to lots of places in the city and its outer suburbs.

So...while it's technically accurate re the Metro alone, it's not totally accurate in describing in the transportation options in metropolitan and greater Barcelona.

I'm sure that is the case with other maps in that list (I'm especially thinking Tokyo which has TONS of regional trains) but it is perhaps worth noting.

Paxton

by Paxton Helms on Sep 18, 2013 1:06 pm • linkreport

They should put this next to the more schematic map in each train and station. The current map works as long as you are only taking metro. But if you want to mix it up with bike/walking, some sense of distances is very helpful.

by SJE on Sep 18, 2013 1:08 pm • linkreport

Paxton,
on that site, Seoul's map completely excludes subway line 1, perhaps because they consider it to be more of a regional line but it operates as a subway line downtown and even its further afield incarnation still has stops closer together than WMATA's suburban sections.

So I agree it isn't perfect but I found it very interesting to compare.

by Richard B on Sep 18, 2013 1:18 pm • linkreport

Non LTR: I meant filling out the existing white space between the lines.

by varun on Sep 18, 2013 1:21 pm • linkreport

Wow, I guess to get the beltway centered, we better extend the Blue to Annapolis, Green to Waldorf and Red to Mt. Airy... lol

by coneyraven on Sep 18, 2013 1:22 pm • linkreport

YES. Why don't more people realize this? Anything outside of DC and Arlington should really be commuter rail, and we should have a much more extensive system in the core.

People do realize this.

However, commuter rail in this country tends to involve the use of existing rail right of way. Building brand new tracks and stations is expensive, whether it's for Metro or for Commuter Rail.

There isn't a rail corridor going out through Tysons and to Dulles. There was one, once, that was pretty close. But alas, the W&OD is no longer a railroad, their right of way is no longer intact. And thus, American-style commuter rail isn't an option.

by Alex B. on Sep 18, 2013 1:23 pm • linkreport

What's up with the two western-most Loudoun County station names? For fun, GGW may want to start its own naming contest and maybe David Alpert can forward it to the Loudoun County transportation group. I doubt "606" and "772" will stick around and I strongly disliked the Fairfax County names prior to the survey work and public outreach they did back in early 2012.

Route 606: Lockridge Road or Moran Road
Route 772: Ashburn or Ashburn Village or Ryan Park

by Transport. on Sep 18, 2013 1:38 pm • linkreport

@Alex B.
I thought that, through the "rails-to-trails" program, the right-of-way *was* retained for rail to be reinstated?

by Rich on Sep 18, 2013 1:39 pm • linkreport

this is a few years old now, but my "Metro Distortion Map" at http://mvjantzen.com/metro/map.html lets you toggle between the two styles, albeit without the Silver Line - press 9 for standard map-style spacing and 0 for actual geographic coordinates (and see "about" for many other options)

by Michael on Sep 18, 2013 1:40 pm • linkreport

"I thought that, through the "rails-to-trails" program, the right-of-way *was* retained for rail to be reinstated?"

I beleive W&OD predates rail banking. Note A. There is no connection to the existing rail network - the section of Alexandria in Del Ray where the old RR did, was not retained, and houses were built on it. B. the connection between that part of Alexandria and the place where the trail MP zero now is was taken over for I395. C. There are places in Reston, etc where the trail runs over or under roads or highways, and the at grade crossings were removed. D. IIUC the full ROW was not retained for the park, and housing is now closer to the trail than it was to the original RR, or would be considered appropriate proximity to a working commuter RR. E. Even if all the above were not the case, W&OD runs a bit too far from Tysons to serve to create TOD in Tysons, which is one of the key motivators for the Silver Line.

by AWalkerInTheCity on Sep 18, 2013 1:47 pm • linkreport

@ varun on that we agree. (Didn't intend to put words in your mouth).

@ Eponymous my range would be a little wider. As a baseline, I would tend to support WMATA Rail expansion where the terminals served the beltway.

@ Alex B. Why couldn't a VRE line run a path that serviced the same areas as the Silver Line.

by Non LTR on Sep 18, 2013 1:54 pm • linkreport

Railbanking wasn't codified by Congress until 1983.

The W&OD's last gasp as a railroad was to help in the construction of Dulles in the 60s. When the W&OD officially went under, they sold off the right of way - some of it was bought for I-66 into Rosslyn.

That, along with many other interurban lines are unfortunate casualties in our transportation history. However, what's done is done - and though the distance to Dulles makes sense for commuter rail, the other context makes Metro an understandable choice.

by Alex B. on Sep 18, 2013 1:56 pm • linkreport

@Eponymous--Metro has really done as much to encourage sprawl as the Beltway or the Dulles Toll Road.

That's a very astute point you make, and certainly this map-to-scale is visual proof.

by MJ on Sep 18, 2013 2:00 pm • linkreport

I seem to recall that London produced a map that was more accurate downtown to encourage people to take less common connections/walk by showing how close some stations were really together which is not apparent on the schematic version.

Hmm or maybe it was just a private individual that did it, either way something like this http://www.london-tubemap.com/walking_links.php

by BTA on Sep 18, 2013 2:02 pm • linkreport

Why couldn't a VRE line run a path that serviced the same areas as the Silver Line.

It could - there's no technical reason it couldn't. However, it's not like it would be cheaper to do so.

For a VRE line to work, it would need to connect to other VRE lines - which means building new tracks not just to West Falls Church, but all the way to Crystal City.

by Alex B. on Sep 18, 2013 2:03 pm • linkreport

Well Metro is also a reaction to sprawl that was already happening. Remember that the alternative proposal was to build even more highways including downtown and in the burbs a la what exists in most of middle America/LA.

by BTA on Sep 18, 2013 2:13 pm • linkreport

It is Capitol South, and that is correct, since the station name is referring to the area immediately south of the US Capitol building. Please stop trying to mislead people into thinking it should be Capital.

by DaveG on Sep 18, 2013 2:16 pm • linkreport

wow, going from the ends of the lines to core for <$5 sure is an inexpensive ride.

by guest1 on Sep 18, 2013 2:20 pm • linkreport

But, in London, the fare structure is such as making those walking connections don't increase your fare above the preset daily rate of £8.40 peak (for most of central London). So, when I lived in Oxford and commuted into London, I knew that I could make as many separate trips as needed for no more than that peak rate. If Metro offered some type of daily fare (aka, like the Oyster pay-as-you-go cap above or travelcards), it would be different and knowing those walking distances between stations would be more important.

by Thad on Sep 18, 2013 2:23 pm • linkreport

Metro has really done as much to encourage sprawl as the Beltway or the Dulles Toll Road.

So wrong. Metro has increased investment in the core, since it makes jobs in the core convenient to outlying places. The Beltway especially encourages commuting from one suburban area to another.

Just because a transportation mode connects far-flung places doesn't mean it generates sprawl. The real sprawl problem is sprawling jobs, which results in people moving even further out. Concentrating jobs in the core (which Metro has resulted in) makes a metro area more compact than the alternative, because people are only willing to travel so far each day for a job.

by MLD on Sep 18, 2013 2:28 pm • linkreport

They don't really need to make a daily rate, they can just make virtual transfers like at the Farraguts and only count the actual mileage you use on the train toward your total fare.

by BTA on Sep 18, 2013 2:37 pm • linkreport

I don't think Metro encourages sprawl in the least, but it doesn't really matter because there's no money to expand it anyway, and that's not even addressing the issue of capacity. Every once in a while you'll read some ignorant comment online saying "Extend the Orange Line to Haymarket" or some "study" by an elected official (see: political posturing), but other than that I think most have accepted the reality of the situation.

The closest thing to expanding rail service in NoVA following the Silver Line at this time is an extension of the VRE to Gainesville. At least some of the infrastructure is already there, the biggest issues are funding (surprise) and working out the agreements with NS to allow more cars on their lines. I still think it's a 2020 if not later kind of thing though, which is a shame because I always enjoyed riding it and western Prince William would be a cashcow for them.

by Joe on Sep 18, 2013 2:40 pm • linkreport

When I look at this map I'm immediatley struck by is the dichotomy of the MD vs. VA lines. Despite have four lines, there are basically only two Metro "corridors" for all of NoVA. Meanwhile, in MD there are six "corridors" that make Metro a nearby transit option for a much larger share of the population. I knew this generally, but this map, with an accruate geographic layout, really illuminates the issue.

by G-man on Sep 18, 2013 2:58 pm • linkreport

@Richard B: Thanks for the link!

I think part of Line 1 is included on the Seoul map. It also includes the Jungang Line, a loop off of Line 1 along the river that--at least when I lived there--wasn't really part of the subway network. I was always confused about Line 1 and it's various bits; I guess it's part urban rail, part commuter rail, and part national railroad. Line 4 is kinda like that too, in that it changes operators at the city border (and I think trains switch from running on the right to running on the left...).

The Hong Kong map also leaves out the part of the MTR network that used to be the Kowloon-Canton Railway. The KCR was originally an intercity line; then it became more of a regional/commuter line, and is now more-or-less fully integrated into the urban rail network. Actually, before it merged with the KCR in 2007, the MTR was a lot like Metro, I guess.

Beijing's subway system is bigger now, but I think the part on the map in your link does a good job of showing what the rest of the system looks like now... a grid encircled by square-ish rings, just like that city's road network.

by Steven H on Sep 18, 2013 3:00 pm • linkreport

I Love It! I don't find it harder to read, and I find it easier to relate to.

Can I get it as a shower curtain?

by Tina on Sep 18, 2013 3:05 pm • linkreport

Metro does encourage exurban sprawl. People will drive a certain distance to the farthest-out stations. New suburbs are going up in West Virginia because of the Silver line.

We should have concentrated on an inner-beltway urban transit system instead. And we need to improve transit between existing urban cores (Baltimore) before laying lines for new exurbs.

What we've done is just pander to developers and let them decide our planning (as usual).

by Tom Coumaris on Sep 18, 2013 4:51 pm • linkreport

"New suburbs are going up in West Virginia because of the Silver line. "

evidence for this? There is new development in WVa already, the logical route from there to DC is via MoCo. There may be a few more people going from WVa to Tysons because of the silver line - but they will still have to deal with the problematic mountain passes (in winter) into Va as well as the sheer distance across west loudoun, and either the use of relatively slow rte 7 or the expensive Greenway. Some of those may find the benefits of metro to tysons vs driving on DTR enough to incent moving to WVa, but I dont think its many.

"We should have concentrated on an inner-beltway urban transit system instead."

Who is this "we" kemosabe? The non-federal share of silver line funding comes from Va, FFX County, Loudoun County, Tysons developers, and DTR toll payers.

by AWalkerInTheCity on Sep 18, 2013 5:06 pm • linkreport

MLD - I think you may be taking my point differently than I meant it.

I didn't say that sprawl is the ONLY effect or even the largest or most important effect of Metro. But when you think about it - the trend of people moving to the suburbs and exurbs had its limits, because most jobs were still located in the core and only so many people could fit on the highways. Thanks to our ever-increasing expansion of Metro far, FAR outside the core, though, more and more people can expedite their exurban commutes, expanding the geographic range of where they are willing to live. They have those 1/2 acre lots, and they drive everywhere else (some people's car commutes to and from Metro are much longer than my bike commute to work!).

This is not vibrant urban living, it's possibly not any more environmentally friendly than simply not having Metro at all, and it's sad to think of how much MORE vibrant closer-in locales would be if this investment had happened there instead. It also impedes the region developing community - how often do you visit a friend in Vienna if you live on H Street? What do you do if you work in Silver Spring and your spouse works at Tyson's?

by Eponymous on Sep 18, 2013 5:56 pm • linkreport

A couple more comparison links (first from radialcartography.net)
http://radicalcartography.net/subways_2.pdf
Second, of course, xkcd:
http://xkcd.com/1196/

by David F-H on Sep 18, 2013 9:11 pm • linkreport

So how far is Wiehle from Spring Hill in minutes and miles? And why aren’t there any stations in-between them.

The biggest question this map leaves me with is why some stations so close together and others far far apart. Ones that come to mind are Minnesota Ave, Benning Rd, and Deanwood (they could have gotten rid of Minnesota Ave); Waterfront, Navy Yard, Capitol South, Federal Center, L'Enfant Plaza (these stations are all almost on the same streets just blocks apart) and Metro Center, Gallery Place & Judiciary Sq. (could have gotten rid of one and shift trains to another or moved one station further east or west)
What’s with almost every Red Line station on the eastern side twice the distance between stations as on the western side? (pre Noma) Both areas had populations back when the system was built so what gives (was redlining, income or race a factor)

@ BTA

We still didn't win out on that one; there should have been Metrorail on every spot there was supposed to be a planned highway meaning that there should be about 4 more lines that go through DC outside of downtown. There should be Metrorail lines on North Capitol, New York Ave, Florida Ave, and Military RD if we were following the highway plan.

@ MLD

Would there be the same sprawl outside the beltway if all Metrorail lines terminated inside of the beltway with absolutely no plans to expand outside the beltway?

by kk on Sep 19, 2013 3:19 am • linkreport

While incredibly interesting, I'd stick with the existing one. It's abstraction somehow makes it more memorable and understandable. Maybe becasue simplifying the information makes it easier to hold in one's mind.

by Thayer-D on Sep 19, 2013 6:10 am • linkreport

@kk: there's nothing between spring hill and wiehle because...there's nothing between spring hill and wiehle. Really, go out there--it's low density subdivisions and park land. Much better for everyone for the train to just stay at max speed than dwell there. There was some talk about putting in a station at wolf trap, which would basically then be an enormous commuter lot most of the time, but 1) you've got NPS, 'nuff said and 2) it's not clear that the strategic goals of the silver line are met by putting an enormous commuter lot there. (It would basically be for people trying to get into DC, but without improvements at the rosslyn tunnel, there isn't enough capacity anyway.)

by Mike on Sep 19, 2013 7:22 am • linkreport

@Eponymous
I didn't say that sprawl is the ONLY effect or even the largest or most important effect of Metro. But when you think about it - the trend of people moving to the suburbs and exurbs had its limits, because most jobs were still located in the core and only so many people could fit on the highways. Thanks to our ever-increasing expansion of Metro far, FAR outside the core, though, more and more people can expedite their exurban commutes, expanding the geographic range of where they are willing to live. They have those 1/2 acre lots, and they drive everywhere else (some people's car commutes to and from Metro are much longer than my bike commute to work!).

This is not vibrant urban living, it's possibly not any more environmentally friendly than simply not having Metro at all, and it's sad to think of how much MORE vibrant closer-in locales would be if this investment had happened there instead.

I think you are comparing the wrong things. And I think your characterization that the current situation might not be more environmentally-friendly than NO Metro is entirely wrong. Here's why:
1. Do you think Metro has resulted in more job centralization than the no-Metro alternative? I think it's clear that it has; looking at other large metro areas without transit as robust as Metro shows this - Houston, Atlanta (has heavy rail but not as extensive), Dallas, etc.

2. Given that Metro has resulted in more job centralization than the alternative of no Metro, what that means is that a portion of those jobs that are now close-in in DC or Rosslyn-Ballston would instead be in Tysons, the Dulles corridor, etc. So while yes, there are people who now drive a long distance to Metro and then ride transit into a job in DC, they represent a small set and, in fact, if jobs were spread out further then MORE people would live further out than currently do. Those people who travel very far for jobs would live even further out, and those that live in Fairfax and commute to DC would live in Loudoun and commute to FFX.

You can't just say that Metro somehow allows people to extend their commute because they can drive to Metro and then take it. Commute preference is based on time and travel time willingness has been based on the constraint of a 24-hour day since... forever. 30-35 minutes one-way (~1hr of total commuting) is the ideal travel time for people, with a distribution around that; some people will travel further, some will only accept traveling for less time. Those people who drive for half an hour to Metro and then Metro for 45 minutes to their job would still be on that end of the distribution in the alternative scenario. Except if more jobs were in Tysons/Dulles then that would allow those people to live even further out than they do now with their job closer in.

The fallacy is in thinking that if there were no Metro, everyone would be forced to live closer-in. This isn't true, because the jobs would just move out to where the people are, since there would be no big incentive (Metro) to keep them in the center. And then people would distribute around those jobs as they do now.

In a way, I agree with your assessment that if there were more transit investment in the core then things would be more centralized. It is unclear to me that things would be better if Metro had been built from the beginning as a robust core-only system though. If you could take things as they are right NOW and flip a switch to remake Metro then that would be an obvious benefit. But would Metro have been as effective at revitalizing DC if it didn't reach into the suburbs in the 70s when center cities were undesirable?

by MLD on Sep 19, 2013 8:32 am • linkreport

It would be nice to have the W&OD back, but the silver line does serve much of the same territory. The W&OD trail and the silver line are adjacent through Falls Church, and no farther apart than about a mile out through Herndon, as I recall. The W&OD crossed Shirley Highway (now I-395) at grade just east of Shirlington. That was a problem in the 1960s. Imagine it today! Also, while the kind of commuter rail that serves the airports in Newark and Philadelphia might be suitable for Dulles, I don't think VRE levels of service (basically weekday rush hours only) would work well.

by Steve Dunham on Sep 19, 2013 9:09 am • linkreport

@kk:
"So how far is Wiehle from Spring Hill in minutes and miles? And why aren’t there any stations in-between them."

It's about 8 miles and 8-10 minutes along the Toll Road, depending on how fast you're going.

The reason there are not any stations between them right now is that this is a heavily residential area with little room to develop the kind of station the area would require (ie, a commuter type, with lots of parking). The one possible future addition is a station at Wolf Trap, but that's really not that far from the Spring Hill station.

by NatsFanY2K on Sep 19, 2013 9:44 am • linkreport

@Steve Duhnam:
"The W&OD crossed Shirley Highway (now I-395) at grade just east of Shirlington. That was a problem in the 1960s. Imagine it today!"

Not the best picture, but it certainly made me do a double-take the first time I saw it:

http://www.geocities.ws/pem20165/wodph330ShirleyHighway.html

by NatsFanY2K on Sep 19, 2013 9:55 am • linkreport

I actually still have a 1985 Metro foldout pocket map. At that time, the lines were drawn to scale.

by RF on Sep 19, 2013 10:32 am • linkreport

The map looks kind of like a squashed spider.

Does anyone know if any of the farecard machines still only return dollar coins but don't accept them? It means you can't use your change to buy another card.

by Jack Cochrane on Sep 19, 2013 10:46 am • linkreport

@NatsFanY2K, a Wolf Trap station would be about 2.5 miles from the Spring Hill station. The total distance from Spring Hill to Wiehle-Reston East will be ~5.8 miles. Sand Box John could provide exact numbers if he sees this post.

Yes, the entire stretch from Spring Hill to Hunter Mill Road is suburban residential housing, so other than Wolf Trap, there is no viable dense enough spot for a station. However, the provisions to provide for a future station at Wolf Trap were dropped from Phase 1 to cut costs.

As for the scale map, I think WMATA should provide a filled in version of this type of map on their website for travel directions and distances. Fill it in with the major roads and towns.

by AlanF on Sep 19, 2013 10:57 am • linkreport

Correction: a Wolf Trap station would be about 1.5 miles from Spring Hill.

by AlanF on Sep 19, 2013 11:09 am • linkreport

@AlanF:
"However, the provisions to provide for a future station at Wolf Trap were dropped from Phase 1 to cut costs."

Right. I think this was a wise move because it would have been difficult/expensive to develop and might not serve area residents any better than the Wiehle Avenue station, given constraints by NPS. (Except perhaps during Wolf Trap events)

Wiehle will have a good amount of parking available, so perhaps that will draw cars away from the Tysons Corner area - a Wolf Trap station with parking might have encouraged people to drive toward TC.

by NatsFanY2K on Sep 19, 2013 1:11 pm • linkreport

@AlanF:
As for the scale map, I think WMATA should provide a filled in version of this type of map on their website for travel directions and distances. Fill it in with the major roads and towns.
They already have a google map version of the metro map on the website--just click "Google Map" in the upper right here.

Is that what you're looking for?

by Gray on Sep 19, 2013 1:26 pm • linkreport

@ Gray

Perhaps he meant something that could be used offline.

Almost every system on the planet has two versions of their map available one non geographically accurate and the other geographically accurate.

WMATA used to have paper version of the regular map and a geographically accurate version but i haven't seen them in 15 years if not more.

by kk on Sep 20, 2013 2:28 am • linkreport

makes you realize there should be an inner ring belt line connecting outer stations together so people don't have to go all the way and then all the way out.

by Art R on Sep 23, 2013 4:56 pm • linkreport

If you're going to blame sprawl on something, blame it on the beltway. As it stands, Metro needs to reach to more areas between 5-10 miles outside of the beltway - specifically to areas east and south of DC - the whole point is to ease road congestion for commuters, is it not? There is a vast swath of land from South of Alexandria counter-clockwise clear up to the red line where the Metro barely extends beyond the Beltway, if at all. But of course, these areas are less affluent, and therefore have less of a voice.
Development has been influenced by the Beltway, especially when it comes to residential development. But the jobs for so many are in the city. Areas such as Mt. Vernon and Fort Washington have no option but to fight the heavy traffic on Rt. 1 and 210/295. Extending lines on major thoroughfares cuts down on traffic. Never mind the economic opportunities inherent in connecting National Harbor to the Metro system.

by Voron Xarya on Oct 7, 2013 1:40 pm • linkreport

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