Greater Greater Washington

Proposed MetroExtra bus route would serve all of Rhode Island Avenue in DC

A new MetroExtra bus route could connect the entire Rhode Island Avenue corridor between downtown DC and Mount Rainier for the first time. Unfortunately, there isn't any funding yet.


The proposed MetroExtra G9, based on this map from WMATA. Click for an interactive map.

At a Bloomingdale Civic Association meeting Monday night, WMATA unveiled a proposal for a route that would run along the Rhode Island Avenue corridor from downtown DC to Mount Rainier with a single-seat ride. Today, this can't be done without changing buses at least once, a holdover from DC's original transit system planned and built over 80 years ago.

The proposed MetroExtra route G9 is an outcome of the latest of several studies of major bus corridors, this one encompassing the G8 Metrobus, which runs between Michigan Park and Farragut Square, and the 80s, which run between the Rhode Island Avenue Metro station, College Park, and Calverton. (This study does not appear on the Metrobus Studies Website yet.)

The route would make more limited stops than the other bus routes along the corridor, stopping at about every half-mile. It would give residents of Ward 5 and Mount Rainier more frequent and more direct service to downtown, and offer them quicker connections with other major bus routes, such as the 70s, 90s and 80.

Today's bus routes are a legacy of DC's old streetcar

Today, most buses along Rhode Island Avenue follow routes set decades ago, when DC and its travel patterns were very different. A look at the 1958 map of the DC Transit system shows the 82 streetcar line, which went to Branchville (now part of College Park), followed its own right-of-way in Prince George's parallel to the B&O (now CSX) railroad tracks that now host MARC's Camden Line. From there, it turned south off of Rhode Island Avenue onto 4th Street NE, cut through Eckington onto New York Avenue, then south on 5th Street NW into downtown.

Today's P6 bus roughly traces this part of the old streetcar route. There were also E2 and F2 buses that came east on Rhode Island Avenue from downtown: the F2 took 9th Street NW, as does today's G8, and the E2 went around Logan Circle and took 15th Street NW. Both of these buses turned north from Rhode Island Avenue onto 4th Street NE into Edgewood and Brookland, right where the 82 streetcar turned south.


Section of the 1958 DC Transit map showing Rhode Island Ave and 4th St NE. Reprinted map available at the National Capital Trolley Museum.

Today, the G8 and P6 buses do the same thing. But there's still no bus route that continues on Rhode Island Avenue west of 4th Street NE. As a result, those traveling from Mount Rainier or Ward 5 into downtown must either transfer from the 81, 82, 83 or 84 bus to the Red Line, or take the P6 or walk about 1900 feet under the railroad overpass to get the G8 at 4th & Rhode Island NE to continue west.

The G9 route, as proposed, would terminate at Mont Rainier's former streetcar turn-around. WMATA should consider extending it further north into the rapidly developing Hyattsville Arts District, or perhaps to Route 1 and East-West Highway, where the new Whole Foods will go, or even into downtown College Park. This would make it more of a regional connector that, if it ran frequently enough, might attract a few more commuters out of their cars on this congested portion of Route 1.

It is unclear whether the proposed G9 bus would, like currently operating MetroExtra routes, only run during the day on weekdays and possibly Saturdays, or if it would be a more round-the-clock operation. That will likely depend on the level of funding that is available.

But it is good to see WMATA planners thinking outside the box of historical patterns of bus service to come up with a more sensible service along one of DC's major arteries.

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Malcolm Kenton lives in the DC neighborhood of Bloomingdale. Hailing from Greensboro, NC and a graduate of Guilford College, he is a passionate advocate for world-class passenger rail and other forms of sustainable transportation, and for incorporating nature and low-impact design into the urban fabric. The views he expresses on GGW are his own. 

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I like it - Metro Extra buses should not have to precisely mimic the routing patterns of the local buses they are approximating, and this is a great example of that!

by A. P. on Feb 26, 2014 1:10 pm • linkreport

Improving bus services are a no-brainer, but I'd be shocked if anything gets done here. The 80 bus (the North-South equivalent to the G8) is in much greater need and recently completed a study with a series of modest but useful recommendations. Crickets. And who is accountable for this? GGW I wish you guys would get more political- you act as if you can just point out good ideas and expect them to happen. In my experience, that's rarely the case. We need to organize if we want these sorts of things to actually happen.

by 11luke on Feb 26, 2014 1:15 pm • linkreport

If only it went out a little further

by Richard on Feb 26, 2014 1:18 pm • linkreport

Rhode Island Avenue is a neighborhood street that pretends to be a highway for Maryland drivers during rush hour. If funding can be found, this would be a good corridor for this bus mode as well as a (back to the)future streetcar line. (Page 7)

http://dc.gov/DC/DDOT/Publication%20Files/On%20Your%20Street/Mass%20Transit/DC%20Streetcar/DCTF/DCTF_4_p31-p38_PHASE2.pdf

by Randall M. on Feb 26, 2014 1:20 pm • linkreport

The lack of this exact route has frequently puzzled me at least as rush hour service. Not only that why hasnt PG demanded it out to Hyattsville or College Park yet as mentioned in the article. I've always wondered about the lack of a complete Mass Ave express line. (I suppose NY Ave falls into that category too but it might just be too far gone.) There is an inability to plan robust crosstown service for some reason. I guess they decided to dump everyone on the red line when it opened and never looked back.

by BTA on Feb 26, 2014 1:22 pm • linkreport

This would be great for Mt. Rainer, and even better if it were extended north on Route 1. When I was house searching recently, I considered the Mt. Rainier, Brentwood, Hyattsville area. Those towns are nice because they are walkable, have a nice street grid, etc. But the transit connections north of Mt. Rainier aren't great--I don't believe the 82 has night or weekend service north of Mt. Rainier. For young professionals in their 20s who want to go out on the weekends(like myself), that doesn't make the area very attractive. The lack of a metro in walking distance being the reason why frequent bus service is key.

by Paul on Feb 26, 2014 1:23 pm • linkreport

On the Maryland side, Prince George's County has recognized the relative lack of bus service on Rhode Island Avenue north of Mt. Rainier. This led to the creation of the county-operated Route 1 Ride service, a branded service of TheBus. Unfortunately, the new service isn't all that useful for a couple reasons:

(1) The service ends at the DC line, rather than going all the way to the Rhode Island Avenue metro station. (Probably necessary given that the bus is county-operated, but it would be great if the service ran express across the county line. There's some precedent for county buses operating outside of their county, such as RideOn buses that extend a short distance into PG).

(2) No apparent attempt was made to coordinate the WMATA schedules with the county bus schedules. For example, a WMATA bus and a county bus will leave within 3 minutes of each other, and then no buses will run for 20-30 minutes. Not useful.

by jms on Feb 26, 2014 1:53 pm • linkreport

Agreed that the lack of this kind of route is puzzling. Moreover, the service in the core of the area would be helpful given how much crowding goes on on the G8 at rush hour.

Were this not to happen, metro should consider removing a couple stops from the G8 between 4th St NE and Shaw metro, where they are unnecessarily close together and the frequent stops and crowded buses make commuting a slow and nightmarish process.

by JPC on Feb 26, 2014 1:59 pm • linkreport

@jms: And, as I just noticed recently, the Route 1 Ride buses can't carry bicycles.

by 20712 on Feb 26, 2014 2:05 pm • linkreport

Great idea -- take it all the way out to the IKEA turnaround, in my opinion. The Route 1 Ride buses are already making a difference. This would add to the momentum of creating a truly transit friendly development corridor, to keep car traffic down.

by Greenbelt on Feb 26, 2014 2:05 pm • linkreport

Randall,

The cruel irony is that the "Back to the Past" 82 streetcar played a pretty important role in Rhode Island becoming such a highly used commuter artery, both by fueling the rise of the suburbs in Maryland along Route 1, and later supplying real estate along some of the Maryland portion of US1 for widening to a higher speed artery when the streetcar was converted to bus.

by A. P. on Feb 26, 2014 2:25 pm • linkreport

I understand why a TheBus route would end at the border but I'm not sure why the WMATA routes all end at Rhode Island Ave.

by BTA on Feb 26, 2014 2:28 pm • linkreport

As a recent graduate of UMD, I think running the proposed line to downtown College Park is a great idea. Students rarely, if ever, utilize WMATA buses and instead take the UM Shuttle to the metro station, which is inconveniently located in relation to campus. Providing a reliable and cheaper alternative accessible via Route 1 to get into DC for internships and social life could be marketed very easily to students.

by Tyler Grote on Feb 26, 2014 2:28 pm • linkreport

Noting what Tyler has to say, I have always long felt that the UMD shuttles should disappear all together. He is right UMD students don't ride the public buses because they have their own extensive bus systems. Things like the Georgetown or AU shuttle that only connects transit to campus is one thing, but the UMD system has many routes that serves quite a large area. This takes away ridership from the public system which harms the chances of improvements. Where I went to college part of our student fees went to the public bus system which we could ride for free with a student ID, I think this is a good solution.

by nathaniel on Feb 26, 2014 2:45 pm • linkreport

Nathaniel,

Agreed - I noticed how extensive public transit usage among college students was in Pittsburgh, which has this arrangement. It makes good use of the system and guarantees revenue to the transit agency while developing transit riding habits and breaking phobias among college populations.

Bus use is pretty poor here among college students. It's even worse in Baltimore, which actually has Collegetown Shuttles that sadly overlay the MTA #11 line and only furthers stigmas and isolation.

by A. P. on Feb 26, 2014 2:56 pm • linkreport

hmm, That map shows Home Depot/Giant are built on top of Harmony Cemetery.

by Tom Coumaris on Feb 26, 2014 3:39 pm • linkreport

Tom, interesting catch, and I had to do some digging...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Columbian_Harmony_Cemetery

by A. P. on Feb 26, 2014 4:03 pm • linkreport

I bike or walk to work down Rhode Island Ave from 14th St to M St. This proposed line does not cover my commute at all. The headline of this article should be updated to say: "Proposed MetroExtra bus route would serve all of Rhode Island Avenue in DC east of 14th St NW".

by Atlas on Feb 26, 2014 4:13 pm • linkreport

Egads a whole half mile...

by BTA on Feb 26, 2014 4:16 pm • linkreport

Noting what Tyler has to say, I have always long felt that the UMD shuttles should disappear all together. He is right UMD students don't ride the public buses because they have their own extensive bus systems. Things like the Georgetown or AU shuttle that only connects transit to campus is one thing, but the UMD system has many routes that serves quite a large area. This takes away ridership from the public system which harms the chances of improvements. Where I went to college part of our student fees went to the public bus system which we could ride for free with a student ID, I think this is a good solution.

If by disappear you mean get re-branded or follow existing WMATA routes then yes. I use to take a bus from UMD to new Carrolton MARC station. It was awful, the UMD and WMATA stops were never near each other, so it was impossible to wait for which ever one came first and their schedule did not complement each other, the UMD 126 and the WMATA F6 often came within 5 minutes of each other and then had no service for the next hour.

If UMD is going to run buses, they should run them as extensions/express/local/truncated versions of WMATA buses. The 126 could follow the F6's route east of campus closely, making a few extra stops where there are more students and a few less where there are less students. This would be far preferable to the current arrangement.

by Richard on Feb 26, 2014 4:23 pm • linkreport

jms actually provides the foundation of a solution that can be implemented relatively quickly: Expand and extend the Route 1 branded bus from Prince George's County to include the within DC running route proposed for the MetroExtra bus.

Let PG County run it.

I am a big fan of branded buses. I think the Rte. 1 bus people have done a reasonably good job with marketing. Part of the problem with ridership is that Rhode Island Ave. east of 4th St. NE is relatively underpopulated.

I thought that I had blogged about this service, but I guess I haven't. I have some photos somewhere and some of their marketing materials.

But again, using the concept of network breadth and depth as well as the necessity to push "the region" and WMATA to reconsider and expand cross-border bus service between DC and MoCo and PGC rather than to truncate it at the DC line (the 80s buses do go to Rhode Island Metro but bus service on Connecticut and Wisconsin Avenues is truncated at the border), doing an expansion of the Rte. 1 bus into DC solves the problem, and allows a new service to be piloted and tested much more quickly.

(Note also that RideOn service goes into DC at Takoma Metro and in a couple other places along Western Ave. too.)

by Richard L. Layman on Feb 26, 2014 4:26 pm • linkreport

To be technical it does not "connect the entire Rhode Island Avenue corridor between downtown DC and Mount Rainier" Rhode Island Ave goes pass 14th Street NW where this bus turns off at so it does not connect it entirely when Rhode Island Ave ends at Connecticut Ave.

Anyway everyone that is speaking about Metrostations a better question to ask is why don't all buses there terminate near a Metrorail Station just end at the station instead ? Mt Rainer is near two Metrostations West Hyattasville & Deanwood) that would only add about 10 minutes to trips if the right route was taking.

Deanwood is especially striking when it takes less than 15 minutes or (less than 10 minutes with no traffic) to drive between Mt Rainer & the station but if you took transit you would have to take a long trip that could be more than 1 hour B2-X2-V7/8 or F1/2 to Metrorail. Then to make matters worst there is a new development that includes housing and a shopping center that people would be sure to visit either for work or shopping.

---------------

Another thing that should be done is some type of transit on New York Ave. There are many routes that cross New York Ave or use it for a few blocks (less than 5) nothing goes on it really. It creates real hardships for anyone trying to get to anywhere along New York Ave especially the NE side.

Five to 10 minutes off of New York Ave in any direction you Metrostations or places that receive lots of transit use both not a single damn bus uses New York Ave.

--------
@ jms

Actually the Bus does cross county lines a little bit to b fair; the 25 and 33 routes go in to DC (Southern Ave)though your point is taken DC Circulator, Montgomery County Ride On, Fairfax Connector, and Dash all go into other counties/jurisdictions far more than the Bus

by kk on Feb 26, 2014 4:29 pm • linkreport

I would surmise that UMD runs the service more cheaply than WMATA could.

by BTA on Feb 26, 2014 4:43 pm • linkreport

wrt kk's point about Metro station connection points for bus service, many years ago at a Gateway CDC meeting I was talking about "my" idea for a streetcar on RI Ave. and a board member suggested it go to/from Dupont Circle.

by Richard L. Layman on Feb 26, 2014 4:45 pm • linkreport

@ Richard L. Layman

The 23 Ride On goes to Sibley which is well into DC further than Takoma.

That Route 1 line only helps if you are going to Ikea; instead of trying to get PG County to add bus service that goes into DC why not try to get them to add Saturday and Sunday service first!

If Rhode Island Ave is underpopulated why not use Bladensburg RD which definitely is not in Ft Lincoln.

Why not have a route that is the same as this to Rhode Island Ave Metro then along Brentwood Rd, New York Ave, Bladensburg Rd, Eastern Ave to Mt Rainer

http://www.mappedometer.com/?maproute=258769 as an example with a map

by kk on Feb 26, 2014 4:49 pm • linkreport

@kk

I like your idea for a New York Ave NE bus connecting Mt. Vernon Square with the Costco/Fort Lincoln. The route could be (from west to east):

New York Ave NW to New York Ave NE to a right on Florida Ave NE to a left on to 4th or 5th St NE (through Union Market) then following around the north end of Galludet University to Mt. Olivet Rd to West Virginia Ave NE to Fenwick St passing the transfer terminal for D3, D4, E2 and E3 buses in Ivy City, and east on New York Ave NE to Bladensburg Rd NE to V St NE (V St NE is currently a bus-less business area) to South Dakota Ave NE to Fort Lincoln and Costco.

These buses, maybe call it the "D7" (or "D9" if limited stop), could share the existing route 74 Convention Center turn-around area near Mt. Vernon Square.

A simpler option may be to extend the D4 route from Ivy City to Bladensburg Rd/V St/Fort Lincoln/Costco in NE.

by Transport. on Feb 26, 2014 5:04 pm • linkreport

Another Avenue that desperately needs a single, continuous bus route is Massachusetts Avenue, especially between Dupont Circle and Union Station, and from Wisconsin Avenue to Stadium-Armory would be even better.

by Frank IBC on Feb 26, 2014 5:08 pm • linkreport

I would surmise that UMD runs the service more cheaply than WMATA could.

Sure, but it means UMD should coordinate around WMATA's schedule so that they are sharing stops and spacing buses out so you don't have a WMATA bus immediately followed by a UMD bus that taking a similar route.

by MLD on Feb 26, 2014 5:11 pm • linkreport

kk -- better to use the idea of an extended route to do both, extend the line in DC to be more useful, and add weekend service.

wrt costco service, maybe like how WMATA used to have a special bus that would serve Lorton on weekends back when it was a prison, so that people could visit their loved ones, you could try weekend service. Between Florida Ave. and Costco there's not much going on as of yet.

Even so, it'd be damn hard to carry lots of purchases on such a bus.

too bad that DC/DDOT didn't try to push Costco to do a delivery service over a certain transaction amount, as I proposed wrt Walmart. That being said it's still hard to get to.

by Richard L. Layman on Feb 26, 2014 5:20 pm • linkreport

... I forgot about that Sibley run, but yes. It's a decent precedent.

by Richard L. Layman on Feb 26, 2014 5:20 pm • linkreport

@ Transport

WMATA already tried to extend the D4 to Ft Totten and cutting the E2 there; it didnt work out.

@ Richard L. Layman & Transport

After looking at the Metrobus Map & actually maps for DC, & PG County I would do this (its long and complicated)

New 81 route as all day Limited Stop bus between Shaw Metro & Greenbelt Metro skipping College Park which is basically the same as the G9.

This would be followed by two additional new routes a B3 and B4. The B3 would run between Mt Rainer & Union Station via Bladensburg Rd, New York Ave, 1st St & North Capitol St with limited-stop along portions of route. The B4 would run between Brookland & Deanwood via Avondale, Mt Rainer, Ft Lincoln & PG Hospital this would take portions of the G8 east of Brookland & the H6.

Discontinue the 82, F2, H6 & R4 routes. The 82 duplicates many routes so does not lose passengers, F2 is the same as the F1 except for a mile and would keep the F1. H6 & B8/9 are the same route except one starts at Brookland while the other Rhode Island Ave. R4 would be broken up and portions taken by the G8, 86 & F8.

To have the same levels of service and cover all areas previous covered I would run and extended 83 to Beltsville route more often this combine with an 81 Limited Stop route and the 86 route that is rerouted to also serve West Hyattsville (replaces R4) and extended northern portion to Columbia Pike and a extend the G8 to West Hyattsville Michigan Ave & Queens Chapel Rd takes care of the R4 being discontinued.

A newly routed B9 to run between Ivy City & Ft Lincoln via New York Ave, Bladensburg Rd, V Street NE, Ft Lincoln, Franklin Street, 14th St, Brookland Metro, Edgewood, Bloomingdale, NOMA Metro, Gallaudet University, Noma Metro.
Also extend the E2/3 from Ivy City to Noma via West Virginia Ave & Florida Ave due to there being no reason to go to Ivy City at the moment though there is development happening in the area.

by kk on Feb 26, 2014 8:51 pm • linkreport

Paul: This would be great for Mt. Rainer, and even better if it were extended north on Route 1. When I was house searching recently, I considered the Mt. Rainier, Brentwood, Hyattsville area. Those towns are nice because they are walkable, have a nice street grid, etc. But the transit connections north of Mt. Rainier aren't great--I don't believe the 82 has night or weekend service north of Mt. Rainier. For young professionals in their 20s who want to go out on the weekends(like myself), that doesn't make the area very attractive. The lack of a metro in walking distance being the reason why frequent bus service is key.

Not sure what schedule you looked at, Paul, but Mount Rainier and Brentwood have excellent bus service (82, 83, 84, 86 and T18) all go from 34th Street to the Rhode Island Avenue Metro. At rush hour it's about 3-7 minutes between buses and evening (10-15) with weeknight service running till 1230 and weekend service running until 230a. You are right that north of MtR and Brentwood, transit service isn't that great - Hyattsville does not have great transit service given its walkable urbanity. But from downtown Mt Rainier you have an existing, albeit slow bus to downtown (G8), multiple RI Ave buses (81-86, T18), and a one seat ride to H Street (B2). Not to mention the ability to park a car2go right at the District line and walk over.

What else are you expecting or looking for?

by aa on Feb 26, 2014 10:03 pm • linkreport

kk -- I don't know what you do, but you should be a transit operations planner. A very interesting restructuring.

2. Note that separately I wrote a post which mentioned contra-service on the MARC line to Brunswick, so that people could commute from DC-Silver Spring to White Flint, Rockville, Gaithersburg, and Germantown (I was thinking about applying to a job in Gaithersburg but it's so long to get there by traditional transit).

With the Camden line, it already has reverse commuting capability, but the Riverdale Park station is so poorly placed, and the stop barely used, that having a station in Hyattsville would make a lot more sense, especially as the corridor there re-intensifies. It's $4 to get from Riverdale Park to Union Station on MARC and takes 10 minutes. With a monthly pass (which includes free Metrobus, RideOn, and MTA) its even cheaper.

Adding a Hyattsville MARC station ought to be an element of a restructuring of transit in the Rte. 1 corridor, not unlike the addition of a White Flint station is part of the plan for the Rockville Pike corridor.

by Richard L. Layman on Feb 27, 2014 9:24 am • linkreport

The other thing I was thinking about the Costco is some form of taxi collectif/jitney service using vans having carrying capacity. You could have a few routes, covering different sections of the city, maybe limited hours of service, but providing access. Ideally, Costco would subsidize it. (E.g., years ago, a private "delivery service" was created to buy stuff at Costco and deliver it to NYC customers. DK if Costco does delivery there now.)

I wouldn't make it on-demand, like Montreal, but test it and run it during certain hours of likely high usage.

- http://www.stm.info/en/info/networks/bus/collective-taxi

I'll try to do a write-up.

kk -- you would also find this interesting, http://joelcayford.blogspot.co.nz/2011_12_01_archive.html, one of my correspondents sent it to me. Some real good, pointed slides.

by Richard L. Layman on Feb 27, 2014 9:53 am • linkreport

Mount Rainier does have amazing bus service, but much of it terminates at Rhode Island Ave Metro. Residents have been asking for an extension into the city for a long time so this outcome from the study is welcome news.

We have two full block redevelopments coming to 3200 and 3300 Rhode Island Ave over the next 2-3 years so this increased level of service into DC is well -timed. Most city residents frequent the corridor from Bloomingdale to Hyattsville for retail and entertainment and increased transportation options will only benefit businesses along Rhode Island Ave. Next up: Prince George's bikeshare!

by Brent Bolin on Feb 27, 2014 10:49 am • linkreport

but the outcome is sub-optimal. Great for you in Mt. Rainier, not so great for points north of Mt. Rainier, for either Maryland or DC residents.

by Richard L. Layman on Feb 27, 2014 11:48 am • linkreport

As a resident of Mount Rainier, I would LOVE this route. I take the G8 quite a bit (both during the week and on the weekends), but a more direct bus route to the heart of DC is something I've been hoping for for a long time. I hope the funding for this proposal is abundant. Great read!

by Maurice on Feb 27, 2014 12:56 pm • linkreport

@ Richard L. Layman

That site does bring up some unique points; transit in the US is built in a way to maximized money saved or earned. This can be seen with Metrobus routes that all end at stations where no one is going to and thus requires a transfer to either another bus or rail.

Almost all of the outer stations fit with this and some of the inner ones Rhode Island ave, Anacostia, Pentagon, Silver Spring, and Friendship Heights when they could go further into the areas but no that wouldn't make money from metrorail transfer. Another way to look at it would be look at how many Metrobus routes cross any of the rivers or bridges in the area.

Take for example these stations Pentagon, Anacostia, Shady Grove how many people do you think live or work in those areas that are using the bus.
For the Pentagon many people work there but many people also only go there to take buses that terminate there, this was shown after 9/11 when those routes were rerouted to Pentagon City.
With Anacostia many of the routes use to go over the Anacostia River into DC but were cut in half when the Green Line opened making you transfer to the train. This caused many people's fares to go up by half or double many complained and that is why the special Anacostia Fare was created. There is no reason why most people would go to Anacostia except for to transfer to another bus or the Green line.

Shady Grove would be another example; most routes terminate there though many people continue one somewhere else such as DC, Bethesda, Rockville and so on. Almost of the buses from Shady Grove go north except for maybe 4. One of those 4 terminates there and goes south the others stop in Shady Grove and terminate somewhere else. Why not have more do that also ?

If I was DDot or WMATA I would go out into each neighborhood where buses run and see exactly what places people might go to shopping centers/malls, clinics/hospital, schools/colleges, library, post office, movie theaters, office buildings, nursing homes etc. From that draft routes that would reach those areas.

In the case of getting people to work DC has the data from the Tax and Revenue Office on where people work and where they live; if that was plotted on a map with transit routes you would see where people work, live and if the bus routes match that which would also determine why or why not people using a route. If they don't reshuffle some routes all of this would be assuming there is a high number of people working in one place or general area.

by kk on Feb 27, 2014 12:58 pm • linkreport

"That site does bring up some unique points; transit in the US is built in a way to maximized money saved or earned. "

The Fairfax County Bd of Education asked for a 5% budget increase, to make up for years of pay freezes, competition with other jurisdictions, and issues with growing numbers of kids from homes afflicted by poverty or related issues. The Bd of Supervisors gave them a 2% increase. Every local jurisdiction (maybe even DC?) faces budget constraints.

by AWalkerInTheCity on Feb 27, 2014 1:04 pm • linkreport

I deal with Geographic Information Systems focusing on retail planning or basically where to locate stores based on the makeup of the area in terms of geography, roads and transit, ethnic demographics, income, others stores in that area etc.

I've also dealt with Social Work and Anthropology in the past abroad

by kk on Feb 27, 2014 1:14 pm • linkreport

@ Richard L. Layman

That last statement was direct at you.

by kk on Feb 27, 2014 1:15 pm • linkreport

(sure, I know about RTAs and stuff... Makes sense.)

by Richard L. Layman on Feb 27, 2014 1:23 pm • linkreport

Re: UMD Buses

Shuttle-UM is paid for entirely by student fees. Anyone affiliated with UMD College Park rides for free. Given a choice between a free ride or having to pay each day, I don't think the schedule matters, nor your comfort level on public buses- If you're taking the bus to campus every day, you're going the free way.

While I agree it's an ideal age for people to get used to public buses, the vast majority of students ride on Shuttle-UM buses that are heavily subsidized by apartment complexes they live in, and/or the SGA, or they live very close to campus. The amount of students riding to/from campus on public buses is negligible. Plenty of students use Metrorail to get to campus. Plus, Shuttle-UM a closed system, so there is no reason to coordinate with other bus systems. And the university likes having control over things (such as locking the campus down every night).

Because of the limited number of vehicles, the route schedules are dictated by the length of the route. That is why headways at rush hour are sometimes longer than at off-peak. There is no way to properly coordinate UMD bus schedules with any other system.

Re: G9/PG

With regard to the G9, there isn't nearly the demand north of Mt. Rainier terminal as there is south of it, at least not yet. All of those routes south of Mt. Rainier get really good ridership, each and every one. A route like the G9 is not going to be at all on TheBus' priority list right now. As someone else said, try coordinating the 17 with WMATA routes, or try starting with weekend service. Although I've heard that weekend service might be starting in a limited fashion.

Also, public transit from UMD/College Park to downtown DC already exists- it's called Metrorail. May not be a one-seat ride, but it's a lot faster and more reliable than a bus!

by mociab on Feb 27, 2014 6:45 pm • linkreport

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