Greater Greater Washington

Links


Breakfast links: Mo' MoveDC


Photo by Brett Weinstein on Flickr.
What about drivers?: MoveDC includes new cycling and transit infrastructure, but it will also benefit drivers. Without toll lanes and a cordon charge, higher population would lead to unbearable congestion. (City Paper)

Lessons from Amsterdam: Decades of effort to promote safety and non-automobile modes led to Holland's integrated transportation system. Replicating that here will also require a culture shift, starting with young parents. (Post)

Remaking Little Washington: Jim Abdo, a prominent developer in Logan Circle and on H Street in DC has set his sights on Washington, VA. Despite its famous inn, the town has been languishing, but will redevelopment bring success? And at what cost? (Post)

Metro opens (restroom) doors: The new Silver Line stations will feature multiple public restrooms. But most existing stations already have restrooms; passengers just have to ask a station manager. (Post)

The highest wage in the land: Seattle's city council unanimously passed a $15/hour minimum wage, the highest in the nation. Small-business groups lent support, as higher-paid workers have more money to spend locally. (Next City)

Building for resilience and livability: A proposed barrier along New York City's Lower East Side will not only protect an electrical substation and apartments from flooding, but will also bridge over a highway and provide access to the river and parks. (NextCity)

No drunk driving without driving: Drunk driving deaths in Arizona fell 46% after the state required in-car breathalyzers for all offenders, but further decreases could be made by promoting alternatives to driving, such as transit and taxis. (CityLab)

An ISO standard for cities: The International Standards Organization has standardized city performance indicators, such as amount of pollution or percentage of residents in slums. This should permit fair comparisons and lessen manipulation of data. (CityLab)

And...: A new laundry service uses bicycles that can carry 300 pounds of clothes. (Post) ... Tysons developers minimize traffic impacts to lure tenants. (Post) ... What are smart cities for? One goal should be increasing the quality of democracy. (NextCity)

Have a tip for the links? Submit it here.
Matt Malinowski is a consultant advising government clients on improving the energy efficiency of consumer electronic products, but is interested in all aspects of sustainable infrastructure and community resilience. He lives with his wife in the Truxton Circle/Bates neighborhood of DC. 

Comments

Add a comment »

Yates fails to explain the reasons for the differences in biking culture between the US cities and Amsterdam. When you are commuting short distances, in mostly segregated bike infrastructure, you can ride slowly, and the other things - simple upright bikes, normal clothes, and riding without helmets, flow from that.

Take away the infra and make people bike in mixed traffic (or in bike lanes protected only by white paint) - so that people often need to go fast just to more comfortably mix with traffic - and have a sprawled region, so that for many a bike commute, to not be too long in time, must be fast - and add a hills such as are not found in Amsterdam. You have get a much greater demand for speed, for road bikes, for bike clothes, and for helmets.

Yates does seem to recognize that to become more like Amsterdam we need more segregated infra, and good bike signals. Nowhere does he mention that a denser region, where more people could live within 5 miles of their work, would also make it more amenable to a Dutch style biking culture.

by AWalkerInTheCity on Jun 9, 2014 9:14 am • linkreport

Drunk driving deaths in Arizona fell 46% after the state required in-car breathalyzers for all offenders

So 46%+ of all drunk driving deaths in 'Zona are a result of repeat offenders?

.......

by Richard on Jun 9, 2014 9:25 am • linkreport

a culture shift, starting with young parents.

Holland has no school buses. Kids bike to school. That's where the safety concerns come from. People want their kids to bike to school safety. That means they want protection for bikers, but also that they drive more carefully; their kid is on the road as well.

passengers just have to ask a station manager.

If you dare to. Most of the time, they will deny it's there, or say it's closed for some BS reason. WMATA needs to start working on making toilets more accessible. If necessary, let patrons pay for them as they do in Europe.

Seattle's city council unanimously passed a $15/hour minimum wage

The key word is 'unanimously'. Well done Seattle.

Drunk driving deaths in Arizona fell 46% after the state required in-car breathalyzers for all offenders

Should be standard in all cars. Combine voluntary use with technology so that cops know not to stop you during sobriety stops. Mandate use for DUI offenders.

by Jasper on Jun 9, 2014 9:26 am • linkreport

"but it will also benefit drivers"

That's a hoot.

by charlie on Jun 9, 2014 9:29 am • linkreport

Yeah I think the speed thing is the crux of the issue. People don't move that fast in Amsterdam. The trams move slowish, bikes aren't racing around, cars move slowly, and there are a LOT of pedestrians in more mixed traffic. Culture is important but there was I suspect already a very different built environment to start with like an extensive tram network and mixed use paths. People focus on bikes, which are definitely omnipresent, but first and foremost Amsterdam to me is eminently walkable.

by BTA on Jun 9, 2014 9:37 am • linkreport

Lol to the comment section of the WaPo story on Tysons. Every single one of them is complaining about traffic on the way OUT of Tysons. Ie Route 7 exit on their way home. I drive from one end of Tysons to the other end of Tysons every day on my commute, it takes less than 10 minutes. So clearly, it's not "Tysons traffic" that's bad, its "Tysons commuter traffic" that is, which is an indictment on the lack of multiple access routes back to the burbs and lack of options.

The story is spot on, perception and misinformation about what is the actual cause of traffic. Smh

by Navid Roshan on Jun 9, 2014 9:43 am • linkreport

Gee whiz, The Washington Post finely gets around to writing an article about public rest rooms in the new Silver line stations. These amenities were added post Final Environmental Impact Statement.

by Sand Box John on Jun 9, 2014 9:50 am • linkreport

So 46%+ of all drunk driving deaths in 'Zona are a result of repeat offenders?

Doesn't surprise me at all. Just based on observation it seems like a whole lot of drunk driving is done by people who do it habitually.

by MLD on Jun 9, 2014 9:57 am • linkreport

Some girls in my high school were killed on vacation in North Carolina in broad daylight by a woman with no license and multiple DUIs...

by BTA on Jun 9, 2014 10:04 am • linkreport

What the Amsterdam story does seem to get right is that it's about changing the culture. In our current state of suspicion towards government iniciatives, this will be a lot harder, but it will take a concerted effort to educate the public on the benefits of a good transportation system for it to be successful here. Our measly streetcar efforts are proof that it won't happen only becasue of good intentions.

by Thayer-D on Jun 9, 2014 10:05 am • linkreport

Culture is important but there was I suspect already a very different built environment to start with like an extensive tram network and mixed use paths. People focus on bikes, which are definitely omnipresent, but first and foremost Amsterdam to me is eminently walkable.

Yes, the bike infrastructure and mixed use paths are important, but it's worth noting that those things didn't just happen; they were planned.

And yes, the walkability matters, but that isn't just limited to the old center of Amsterdam. If you venture out to the modern and more recently developed places, you'll still find an emphasis on bikes in the infrastructure design:

http://goo.gl/maps/R6LlA

Of course the center of Amsterdam is walkable; it was built and planned when walking was the predominant means of transportation. But it would be a mistake to conclude that such historic walkability is the only reason for the prevalence of cycling (and transit use). It has been actively incorporated into the design of streets.

by Alex B. on Jun 9, 2014 10:07 am • linkreport

Best FAQ from the laundry service website:

Why does service cost more in Washington, DC that in Philadelphia?
Alas, everything costs more in Washington, DC than in Philly.

by Planner on Jun 9, 2014 10:07 am • linkreport

@Richard So 46%+ of all drunk driving deaths in 'Zona are a result of repeat offenders?

Probably. I used to live in Wisconsin, which has a huge problem with drunk driving. People racking up 5 DUIs before they turn 25 isn't unusual, particularly in the rural parts of the state. And it's essentially consequence free. Those are just the times they get caught. The odds are that that sort of person is going to crash into something. My experience was that drunk drivers are habitual. Its not a one time bad decision. Its a happens every weekend (or more) thing.

by Birdie on Jun 9, 2014 10:14 am • linkreport

@ Walker:When you are commuting short distances, in mostly segregated bike infrastructure, you can ride slowly

This separate bike lanes did not fall from the skies. In the 80s, bikes rode on the road. In the 90s, bike lanes were painted. In the 00s, bike lanes were separated. And, now in the 10s, bike highways are being built to enhance fast biking between cities over longer distances.

Take away the infra and make people bike in mixed traffic (or in bike lanes protected only by white paint) - so that people often need to go fast just to more comfortably mix with traffic

No. That is not a need for speed. It's a need for cars to slow down. Bikes (especially kids on bikes) can't go that fast. The point is to get everybody biking, not just the fit.

and have a sprawled region, so that for many a bike commute, to not be too long in time, must be fast - and add a hills such as are not found in Amsterdam. You have get a much greater demand for speed, for road bikes, for bike clothes, and for helmets.

As soon as people feel safer, they'll bike faster. That's why the Dutch are building bike highways now. In this region, we actually have quite a number of long bike trails. Unfortunately, they are narrow, have roots come through them, are poorly maintained, and no right of way. Those are easy fixes. The NPS could start by giving bikes the right of way on all intersections with roads.

Nowhere does he mention that a denser region, where more people could live within 5 miles of their work, would also make it more amenable to a Dutch style biking culture.

Amsterdam and DC are actually not that far apart in density. A'dam has 12k/sq m, DC 10k/sk m.

by Jasper on Jun 9, 2014 10:15 am • linkreport

But my point is that we are inheriting a different built environment than Amsterdam was working with. Obviously culture is crucial but at this point infrastructure needs a way to even give culture shift a chance to happen.

by BTA on Jun 9, 2014 10:19 am • linkreport

We're not Amsterdam. We're never going to be Amsterdam, just like we're never going to be NY in terms of transit. We have to find our own path, which is one reason I fidn the absession to measuring ourselves against Amsterdam a sterile, useless exercise. Amsterdam had no parallel to CaBi. That's a development that admittedly happened simultaneously in a vareity of cities, but the point is we copied no one.

We we will see develop here is essentially three distinct types of cyclists, only the first of which is something like Amsterdam. You have the short-trip, regular clothes riders largely in the urban core (for whom CaBi is a huge boon), you have the longer distance commuters who go faster and wear colorful wicking clothes, and you have recreational cyclists, who run the gamut of speeds, types of bikes, clothing and location. "Amsterdam" as a concept that represents the integration of cycling into daily life is irrelevant to the last two types. The only part of it that is relevant is dedicated infrastructure, and there's nothing particularly Amsterdam about that.

by Crickey7 on Jun 9, 2014 10:19 am • linkreport

The other big cultural shift between Amsterdam and a city like DC is that bikers in the Netherlands follow the law around using bike lanes, stopping at bike-specific traffic lights and sticking to bike lanes. In DC, you still can't get bikers off of crowded sidewalks, even when a bike lane is available.

As DC continues to build out its network of bike lanes and cycle tracks, and as the percentage of bikers increase, it's going to need to determine a tipping point at which it begins to implement and enforce stricter cycling rules.

by Circle Thomas on Jun 9, 2014 10:25 am • linkreport

Congress will never allow a congestion charge/tolls on entering the CBD. If we want to get serious about change and transportation plans we need to consider merging NOVA, MOCO, DC, and PG into it's own state. Having three jurisdictions undermines the ability to develop a real regional transportation infrastructure.

by Redline SOS on Jun 9, 2014 10:29 am • linkreport

@ Circle:The other big cultural shift between Amsterdam and a city like DC is that bikers in the Netherlands follow the law around using bike lanes, stopping at bike-specific traffic lights and sticking to bike lanes.

Waahahhaahaahaaahaaaa. Keep dreaming. If a biker stops at a red light because there's a cop car, the cops will open their window and tell you to bike on and not be a weasel because you see some cops.

If there is one place where traffic laws are pretty much ignored by everyone - on foot, on bike, in a car, in a cab - then it's Amsterdam.

by Jasper on Jun 9, 2014 10:37 am • linkreport

"Amsterdam and DC are actually not that far apart in density. A'dam has 12k/sq m, DC 10k/sk m."

And my impression (like crikeys) is that the L'Enfant city part of DC - which is the densest and flattest, and has the most cyclists - has a bike culture more like Amsterdam's. Lots of folks on hybrid/city bikes, lots of regular clothes, somewhat fewer helmets.

Note that even were DC to have the same density as Amsterdam (but it would need to grow by 20% to reach that) it is still far hillier outside the L'Enfant city, and its has far less (and less good) segregated infra. That latter will change with MoveDC, but the former will not. Note also, that a lot of the cyclists Yates sees riding around DC, are longer distance commuters from the suburbs - with longer rides, and lots of hills. Even were the seg infra perfect (and W&OD and Custis are pretty good) they would likely still be riding road bikes and using bike clothing.

I am also not convinced slower auto traffic is unconnected to regional density.

by AWalkerInTheCity on Jun 9, 2014 10:38 am • linkreport

@Circle Thomas: I was just in Amsterdam 3 weeks ago. Not all the cyclists follow the rules--not by a long shot (neither do the peds or drivers). And there is no requirement that I ride in a bike lane if one is available. I will ride where it is safest. And I take into consideration speeds, crappy road conditions, and congestion on the sidewalk.

And DC should enforce the rules with cyclists when it enforces then with drivers. You sound like many other complainers who apparently just ignore the way drivers behave.

by RDHD on Jun 9, 2014 10:41 am • linkreport

@RDHD And DC should enforce the rules with cyclists when it enforces then with drivers. You sound like many other complainers who apparently just ignore the way drivers behave.

Hardly. If anything, this is a city that needs more comprehensive coverage from red light cameras, and a no-right-turn-on-red rule on the books.

As for bikers in the Netherlands, once you get past the touristy first rings of Amsterdam, you'll find the density is closer to what you see in DC, the bikers following the rules becomes the norm, not the exception.

by Circle Thomas on Jun 9, 2014 10:51 am • linkreport

@ Redline:

Congress will never allow a couple of bucks per day for a toll, but they will allow creation of a whole new state? Really?

by Jason on Jun 9, 2014 10:56 am • linkreport

Following traffic laws (for cars, at least) is a uniquely American concept.

by Hadur on Jun 9, 2014 10:56 am • linkreport

So 46%+ of all drunk driving deaths in 'Zona are a result of repeat offenders?

Probably not quite that many. According to a NHTSA report earlier this year (Warren-Kigenyi, 2014), the national average for DUI arrests is that 25% are repeat-offenders, with a range of 11% - 41% depending on state. In 2007, when Arizona's new DUI laws went into effect, they got a lot of press. Headlines called them the "toughest in the nation." In addition to the ignition-lock devices, AZ also added a new category of "super-DUI" with mandatory jail time for a BAC over 0.2%. In addition to cutting down on recidivism, I could imagine this having a ripple-effect, discouraging drunk driving among those who have not had a run-in with the justice system.

Either way, 46% seems like a great deal of of improvement. I hope there will be some analysis of the data to to help efforts in other jurisdictions to replicate Arizona's success.

by EricJay on Jun 9, 2014 11:09 am • linkreport

@ RDHD:And there is no requirement that I ride in a bike lane if one is available.

Yes there is. Round blue signs with a bike depicted in them indicated which bike lanes are mandatory.

Also, Amsterdam may be dense, but biking is popular all over Holland (and Belgium, and Germany, and Denmark, and ...). Also in the rural areas. Density is not the issue. Well ok, Europe does not have Arizona-type emptiness.

by Jasper on Jun 9, 2014 11:28 am • linkreport

that biking is popular in rural holland is not the point. The question is, what is the average distance of a bike commute? Of any transportation bike ride? To what extent is the bike culture driven by short distance riders rather than long distance ones? (I note that places like Copenhagen, the rural parts of Holland, etc are still flatter than places like Fairfax, EOTR DC, etc.

IIUC biking is rather less popular in Rotterdam, which was rebuilt post-war, in a more style more like the cities in the english speaking world.

by AWalkerInTheCity on Jun 9, 2014 11:33 am • linkreport

When you are commuting short distances, in mostly segregated bike infrastructure, you can ride slowly, and the other things - simple upright bikes, normal clothes, and riding without helmets, flow from that.

It's worth noting, though, that another feature of bike-friendly European cities like Amsterdam and Copenhagen is bike infrastructure wide enough to facilitate passing, and a bike culture that matches European car culture: everyone stays to the right except to pass. Which means slower cyclists are totally fine, but you can go fast if you want, and Amsterdam is better than the US for fast cyclists too. It's win-win.

by Andrew Pendleton on Jun 9, 2014 11:39 am • linkreport

We have a different political culture. At a guess, I'd say the public in Holland did not see expenditures on cycling infrastructure as a zero-sum game. Here, the investments have to justify themselves in terms of not reducing overall auto capacity while adding new cycling capacity. Cars were not ever the baseline for transportation mode such that other modes were the exception rather than the norm.

by Crickey7 on Jun 9, 2014 11:52 am • linkreport

"The point is to get everybody biking, not just the fit."

That's the point??!?? Maybe, in the cult of the bicycle. Why not say the point is to get everyone jogging? People must jog to work --- much safer. What about swimming to work? We could replace roads with canals....Plus, that's much more suitable for commuting during rainy weather. Where snow prevails, everyone should cross-country ski to work.

RIght?

by Fischy (Ed F.) on Jun 9, 2014 11:55 am • linkreport

I think if fewer people around here wore lycra and went zipping along, people might be less turned off by investments biking.

The bad characteristics about American drivers shows up in American cyclists, namely following the rules that they only care about.

And I say this as a frequent user of the local facilities. You'll catch me in casual clothes and not making dangerous passes around mothers with children while on a public path.

by Local Cycler on Jun 9, 2014 11:57 am • linkreport

Then, we tear up all that asphalt...and people would have to ride all-terrain bikes, or use trail shoes for running.

by Fischy (Ed F.) on Jun 9, 2014 11:58 am • linkreport

"the national average for DUI arrests is that 25% are repeat-offenders, with a range of 11% - 41% depending on state."

Isn't it possible -- perhaps even likely that repeat DUI offenders are far more dangerous than the person who did it once or twice, but got scared straight by a DUI arrest? In fact, I'd expect that the majority of drunk driving deaths are perpetrated by serial, serious offenders.

by Fischy (Ed F.) on Jun 9, 2014 12:03 pm • linkreport

So . . . my bike shorts endanger our turning into Amsterdam.

You have clearly never seen me in my bike shorts.

by Crickey7 on Jun 9, 2014 12:03 pm • linkreport

Local

I've seen folks on road bikes in lycra obeying all laws, and folks in casual clothes on hybrids doing reckless things. And of course in FFX we have a subculture of cyclists who ride in casual clothes, without helmets, without lights, on sidewalks. I don't think that dividing up the cycling community by what we wear gets us anywhere.

Fischy

The point of pro-biking policies and biking infra investments is to get more people biking. It did not mean the point of all life, nor was "everybody" mean literally, as the comparison to Amsterdam (which does not have 100% bike share, even for the city proper) should make clear.

by AWalkerInTheCity on Jun 9, 2014 12:04 pm • linkreport

@Jasper, I was referring to here in DC, not Amsterdam. I'm not required to ride in a bike lane here if there is one. Give me a physically separated lane and I'm in it for preference.

@Local Cycler, the attitude is the problem, not the clothes, nor even the "zipping along". Pass when it's safe. Ride slowly when necessary. Dress however the hell you want.

by RDHD on Jun 9, 2014 12:08 pm • linkreport

But most existing stations already have restrooms; passengers just have to ask a station manager.

And the Post article was in large part about what an elaborate kabuki "just" asking appears to be.

by J.D. Hammond on Jun 9, 2014 12:21 pm • linkreport

I've read quite a few stories about cyclists killed by drunk drivers. I can't think of one where the driver had never had a DUI before.

by David C on Jun 9, 2014 12:24 pm • linkreport

Congress will never allow a congestion charge/tolls on entering the CBD.

We'll see.

by David C on Jun 9, 2014 12:27 pm • linkreport

The only problem I've ever had with bike lanes is when you are out of the lane in order to turn left or pass etc drivers think you are breaking a rule which can be problematic. They should have a left hand sharrow symbol for turning from the leftmost lane where there are striped lanes to make it more clear. Generally though its my impression that I am safer in the lane as most drivers respect the painted strips unless I'm taking the whole lane in which case people will still whip around you to overtake in cars. Again that is where culture intersects with infrastructure but it's my anecdotal observation that drivers are more tolerant of cyclists where lanes exist.

by BTA on Jun 9, 2014 12:37 pm • linkreport

"MoveDC includes new cycling and transit infrastructure, but it will also benefit drivers."
----

You're kidding, right?

I don't know whether to laugh or cry.

by August4 on Jun 9, 2014 12:42 pm • linkreport

August4, mind provided some real example of how the MoveDC plan won't benefit drivers? After all, if the plan reduces the number of SOVs, that immediately benefits the remaining SOV drivers.

by Birdie on Jun 9, 2014 12:51 pm • linkreport

@ August 4

You have to accept the premise that without the changes, and given projected growth, service levels will drop to a failing grade on most of the major commuter thoroughfares for hours a day. In other words, the "no action " alternative is worse.

by Crickey7 on Jun 9, 2014 12:58 pm • linkreport

@Fischy - LOL but of course you know that all this is to make things easier for those who do want to bike or otherwise have and use viable alternatives to driving, although I am opposed to congestion pricing. Leaving things where they are driving wise as motor traffic increases will simply encourage more drivers to use other transportation or at least carpool.

by DaveG on Jun 9, 2014 1:38 pm • linkreport

Regarding the proposed congestion charge, how can it ever have any hope of being implemented if nobody ever proposes it? We're not asking the current Congress or adjoining states for permission to implement this now, only formally proposing it and debating its merits and tradeoffs. One tradeoff appears to be between unbearably bad congestion, and its associated costs or reliable auto travel into DC's core for the price of a Metrorail peak fare.

As has been mentioned before, one additional tradeoff might be between a reliable revenue stream that might support new Potomac crossings with Metrorail (tunnel) and VRE/Amtrak/CSX/MARC (Long Bridge). If you're Virginia you know your future rides on transit connections within NOVA but also into DC and MD. So you're going to have to think long and hard about embracing an 8 or 9-figure revenue stream before you dismiss it out of hand, especially when the alternatives for funding mega projects are few. Also the Silver Line/Dulles Toll Road funding scheme and I-495 Express Lanes have already introduced a cross-modal funding model and variably priced roads to the region, so the basic concepts aren't new.

by Sherman on Jun 9, 2014 1:57 pm • linkreport

SUV's are banned in Amsterdam city limits. That would be a good start here.

by Tom Coumaris on Jun 9, 2014 3:08 pm • linkreport

Hah I would support an SUV ban though to be fair they'd have to do it by dimension or weight or something.

by BTA on Jun 9, 2014 3:12 pm • linkreport

I recall that when the state-of-the-art Huntington Metro bathroom opened in 2003, it cost an outrageous amount of money - maybe hundreds of thousands of dollars? Maybe someone can google this and get the details.

by slowlane on Jun 9, 2014 8:44 pm • linkreport

One tradeoff appears to be between unbearably bad congestion

Yeah, driving is unbearable in the CBD. No one drives there anymore.

mind provided some real example of how the MoveDC plan won't benefit drivers? After all, if the plan reduces the number of SOVs, that immediately benefits the remaining SOV drivers.

The real world example of the driver who won't benefit is the driver who is "reduced" as you say.

by Falls Church on Jun 9, 2014 11:14 pm • linkreport

Yeah, driving is unbearable in the CBD. No one drives there anymore.

That's not how the joke works. It's "no one goes to ____ anymore, it's too crowded." There are plenty of places that are crowded that are also miserable. Places like refugee camps, prisons and Sign of the Whale.

The real world example of the driver who won't benefit is the driver who is "reduced" as you say.

As with any change, there will be winners and losers, but the question was about drivers on average. And, if money from the congestion charge is used to make biking or transit more appealing (without making driving less so), thus leading someone to "reduce" on their own, then they're a winner. So, not even every person who is "reduced" is worse off.

by David C on Jun 9, 2014 11:44 pm • linkreport

@Falls Church: since nobody is forced to stop driving, that would suggest that they'd be taking advantage of an opportunity that isn't available to them now due to a lack of options. Surely you can't be against letting people make choices rather than forcing them into a one-size-fits-all car culture?

by Mike on Jun 10, 2014 7:22 am • linkreport

Dave C

Thats assuming a connection between the congestion charge and the alts. And that switching to the alts leaves drivers better off than before the congestion charge AND the alts. (note most suburban drivers who switch to alts will do so to alts that already existed)

So a simpler analysis of drivers and congestion charges

A. some will still drive and will be better off, because the reduced congestion is worth more than 3 bucks to them.

B.some will still drive and be worse off, becaues the reduced congestion is worth less than 3 bucks

C. some will switch modes or change destinations or make fewer trips and will be net losers, as they would not have switched absent the charge (so must be worse off, assuming rationality and full information)

I beleive there is no a priori way to know which group will be larger. Or what the net impact of drives is if we weight by the extent of gain or loss (many in group C may have been on the knife edge of switching modes, and so may be only a tad worse off when they do so)

Its also misleading to estimate the numbers in each group based on current conditions. MoveDC assumes, IIUC, that congestion in 2040 absent the congestion charge will be far worse than now. Ergo there will be more folks in A and fewer in B.

Also if we take Dave C's assumption that additional alts will be financed out of the charge, that swings it at least a little more to current drivers benefiting.

But I still think most of the gain to drivers will be those relieved of congestion for a modest fee, not the mode switchers/trip reducers.

by AWalkerInTheCity on Jun 10, 2014 9:01 am • linkreport

Even if there are no additional alternatives, drivers who become cyclists might benefit from the increase in other cyclists and the "safety in numbers" benefits that come from that.

And there are people who will switch and realize that they should have done it long ago. So.

D. Some will switch modes or change destinations or make fewer trips and will be net winners, as the nudge of the fee moved them to modes that they discovered were better choices or because investment in alternatives made it more appealing or because the increase in other mode-switchers made it more appealing.

by David C on Jun 10, 2014 10:43 am • linkreport

Add a Comment

Name: (will be displayed on the comments page)

Email: (must be your real address, but will be kept private)

URL: (optional, will be displayed)

Your comment:

By submitting a comment, you agree to abide by our comment policy.
Notify me of followup comments via email. (You can also subscribe without commenting.)
Save my name and email address on this computer so I don't have to enter it next time, and so I don't have to answer the anti-spam map challenge question in the future.

or

Support Us