Greater Greater Washington

Breakfast links: Future transit options?


Photo by Doug Kerr on Flickr.
Time to fix I-66: Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe wants to spend $2-3 billion to ease congestion along I-66 between the Beltway and Haymarket. State Options include a Metro extension, light rail, BRT, more lanes for cars, and other options. (Post)

Columbia Pike to roll forward: The Arlington County Board will authorize building the Columbia Pike streetcar faster and without federal funding tomorrow, thanks to the state's contribution. The two streetcar opponents remain opposed despite state funding. (ArlNow)

Gondola funding hits roadblock: The idea for a gondola from Georgetown to Rosslyn won't get funded for a study from the Council of Governments, but the Georgetown BID still hopes to get the money elsewhere for a study by the end of 2015. (InTheCapital)

Marijuana in public housing?: The DC Housing Authority is funded primarily by the federal government, which considers marijuana possession to be illegal. Now that marijuana is decriminalized in DC, how will DCHA adjust? (City Paper)

No new CaBi bikes: New bikes and docks are not likely this year for any Bixi-based bikesharing systems. This will halt Capital Bikeshare's expansion and move Charm City Bikeshare's launch into next year. (Streetsblog)

DC's Scooby-Doo Ghost Town: L'Enfant Plaza and the cluster of concrete federal buildings around it seem quite ugly. Buzzfeed mocks the area, which it calls "DC's Scooby-Doo Ghost Town," and its architecture.

Will driverless cars encourage sprawl?: A Toyota scientist thinks that if driverless cars making driving easier, people will just live farther away. Tolling could help, but will face political opposition. (Streetsblog)

Schools or transit, not both: A bill in North Carolina would ban counties from adding local sales taxes for both education and transit. This would likely make education advocates oppose any transit funding proposal and vice versa. (NewsObserver)

And...: Can Arlington and Alexandria agree on the future of their transitway? (WAMU) ... How is it "privatization" to set aside spaces for Zipcar-like services while parking your private car on the street is not? (Streetsblog) ... It's legal, and increasingly popular nationwide, to build apartments out of shipping containers. (WBJ)

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Russ Doubleday is a manager of content services at Connections Media on U Street. He's interested in transportation planning and hopes to get a Master's degree in the subject in the near future. He also has an unhealthy passion for all things soccer. He lives in Van Ness and can't wait to get his sidewalk back. 

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A metro extension to Fair Oaks plus bus lanes would sync up nicely with a similar plan on Route 1 and the yellow line. McAuliffe should begin negotiating with DC and Maryland about them committing to a new blue line tunnel so that we can package as one big project that would expand metro at the edges and in the center.

by drumz on Jul 18, 2014 9:52 am • linkreport

That NC law would basically make it impossible for anyone looking to run for office in NC on a pro-public transportation (or even pro-roads) platform.

People already love to exploit the false dichotomy of "transit vs schools" and its stupid to actually make it a legitimate concern.

by drumz on Jul 18, 2014 9:54 am • linkreport

Please please PLEASE extend VRE to Haymarket or Gainesville, and not Metro. But we could also use this opportunity to do some electrification, rationalize the schedule and start running more frequently, and turn VRE into something much more useful than a mere "commuter" railroad.

On the other hand, if the push is in fact going to be for Metro extensions, that needs to immediately be coupled with funding for the downtown loop/Orange Line express track. That might even get me onboard.

by Low Headways on Jul 18, 2014 9:55 am • linkreport

As I have said consistently since the BIXI bankruptcy, CABI is a real trouble. And Alta is being very non-helpful. In December or January they promised DDOT a backup plan. There is none, apparently.

I think there is a very decent chance we won't ever see BIXI style bikes being made again. Who owns the IP to it is unclear. Alta is moving away from Bixi style bikes with the new ones in Seattle. They may or may not be comtabile with BIXI style docks.

Replaceing the entire system would be another huge capital expense. Really the only hope I see is if Equinox buys out the rest of the BIXI assets and starts to make them again.

by charlie on Jul 18, 2014 9:59 am • linkreport

That Buzzfeed article is great. Those buildings are really, really sad and pretty disgraceful. And it's not just the buildings, which some may argue are good architectural examples from the era they were built (ugh). But the AREA around them is in such a sad sorry state.

by JDC on Jul 18, 2014 10:00 am • linkreport

A lot to talk about today:

- "Privatization" in SF. I get where Streetsblog is going but also consider, "so what?". If the city thinks there is a better use for a space than public parking then they should go ahead and do it. If not a car share spot then it could have been for a bike lane or something like that.

- Again, the Gondola is extravagant and the Georgetown BID would be better off seeking funding for more banal fixes to Georgetown like widening the sidewalks. But if they can find some funding source outside of local government then I'll look forward to riding as much as anyone.

- It doesn't look like the anti-streetcar opponents can effect change fast enough via the county board at this point even if Vihstadt wins re-election.

by drumz on Jul 18, 2014 10:05 am • linkreport

Sadly the only thing worse than the outside of the HUD building is the inside.......

by ET on Jul 18, 2014 10:15 am • linkreport

Re driverless cars and sprawl:

They might lower the cost of commuting and make it cheaper to live further away, but they'd also change the rent gradient in urban areas by lessening the need for parking. That would have a similar effect but in the opposite direction. It would take a lot of effort to estimate the relative magnitudes of the two shifts, but it's far from clear that sprawl would increase.

by IMBYdc on Jul 18, 2014 10:20 am • linkreport

@drumz - The Yellow Line extension is only one of the options under study down Rt. 1. My personal preference is to actually run LRT down the center of Rt. 1 from Huntington to Woodbridge. (And, if things are done correctly, eventually connect to the transitway that was just opened on Rt. 1 in Alexandria that connects to Arlington, which will connect to Columbia Pike ... and eventually Rt. 7 and Tysons ... or maybe I just have fever dreams!)

by Thad on Jul 18, 2014 10:22 am • linkreport

No city should undertake another bikesharing rollout that doesn't stipulate an open architecture. There's too much downsize and zero upside to locking these deployments to a single vendor.

by Mike on Jul 18, 2014 10:27 am • linkreport

50 years from now, preservationists will force any unlucky owners of rusted out shipping container properties to lather up the bondo and spray paint.

by The Truth™ on Jul 18, 2014 10:34 am • linkreport

Driverless cars could also evolve into a jitney system. It's not your car, so some of the stigma in sharing the ride with others going your way would drop.

by Crickey7 on Jul 18, 2014 10:36 am • linkreport

Re: Scooby Doo Ghost Towns

Isn't the "Hastily Made Cleveland Tourism Video" wonderful?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oZzgAjjuqZM

by Peter K on Jul 18, 2014 10:37 am • linkreport

Thad,

Me too actually but based on the last conversation GGW had about it (the one where Del. Surovell jumped in) it sounded like the momentum was behind Metro to Beacon Hill plus BRT.

So my thought is that if there is a chance to bundle this and bundle again into blue line expansion then it might be beneficial project wise.

by drumz on Jul 18, 2014 10:37 am • linkreport


@Drumz; basically yes on the streetcar. The biggest question has been the fiscal one and the state money answers that question.

The county and the board has continued to do a poor job with the planning on this. I think there are many many legitimate questions that need to be raised.*

Stonewalling, however, is not the appropriate tactic here.

To go back to the bikeshare example, nobody was asking these questions about Alta and their ability to deliver bikes at the beginning. Because of grant money it looked free, but now the system is in peril. Alta's lack of maintenance on the docking systems -- I don't think they were designed to deal with salt in the winter -- is also an issue.

by charlie on Jul 18, 2014 10:38 am • linkreport

If there are legitimate questions about it then neither Garvey nor Vihstadt are asking them.

by drumz on Jul 18, 2014 10:45 am • linkreport

Regarding marijuana used in public housing, I wonder whether a condo board, or apartment complex, can impose a marijuana smoking ban.

Cigarette smoke was a major complaint from my time on a condo board. Very difficult to control smoke and some people are super-sensitive to it.

My understanding is that it's really difficult to retroactively make a building non-smoking, but I do wonder whether that applies to marijuana.

by kob on Jul 18, 2014 11:04 am • linkreport

@drumz - Yes, I remember that conversation, but I am waiting on the comments from the public to the released (and for the next public meeting to be announced). I know that many were surprised when shown the amount of development at Beacon Hill that Metro would require.

by Thad on Jul 18, 2014 11:06 am • linkreport

In regard to marijuana in private residences and condos, here's one legal analysis: http://www.cohoalaw.com/covenant-enforcement-marijuana-matters-has-your-association-taken-a-shot-at-regulating-pot.html

by kob on Jul 18, 2014 11:07 am • linkreport

Please please PLEASE extend VRE to Haymarket or Gainesville, and not Metro.

Good idea. Screw non-commuters!

That Buzzfeed article is great.

Should be the standard reply to articles claiming the government is living in golden palaces.

The Yellow Line extension is only one of the options under study down Rt. 1. My personal preference is to actually run LRT down the center of Rt. 1 from Huntington to Woodbridge.

Why? Why not extend the existing metroline under the road that's there anyway? Why create another change-over for travellers? Metro is way better for the longer distances that people need to travel there.

by Jasper on Jul 18, 2014 11:14 am • linkreport

Thad,

Heck, I was kind of shocked. I got over it but I totally understand. Still, I'd consider either option to be a victory considering the odds.

by drumz on Jul 18, 2014 11:18 am • linkreport

Why? Why not extend the existing metroline under the road that's there anyway? Why create another change-over for travellers? Metro is way better for the longer distances that people need to travel there.

If the route 1 corridor could support 6-8 car trains every 6 minutes then they should definitely find the cash for metro rail
but with the development on the rte 1 corridor, and the development that is likely to be there for the next 50 years, it cannot fill 6-8 metrorail cars. That's a lot of people.

Of course if the area can pony up the money to overbuild by such an extent and can pony up the money to maintain such infrastructure for 50 years, then they should do it.

I would really like to see metro rail extend down the rte 1 corridor, but only if zoning is going to change there to support the development needed to pay for it.

by Richard on Jul 18, 2014 11:22 am • linkreport

In the distant future I foresee a Metro station in West Virginia (but the silver line will probably get there first).

by Tom Coumaris on Jul 18, 2014 11:35 am • linkreport

@drumz

- Again, the Gondola is extravagant and the Georgetown BID would be better off seeking funding for more banal fixes to Georgetown like widening the sidewalks

The Georgetown BID understands that the Chair of ANC2E considers the narrowness of sidewalks in Georgetown to be part of its historic fabric and will oppose any attempts at permanent change of sidewalk width. They'd rather not bait that bear, so they're looking elsewhere at the moment.

by Dizzy on Jul 18, 2014 11:36 am • linkreport

The NC law is probably unconstitutional as it prevents citizens from voting on whatever issue they want to.

by DaveG on Jul 18, 2014 11:36 am • linkreport

@Richard, the extension of Metro is for about 3.5/4 miles from Huntington to Hybla Valley (of which 1/2 mile of the tunnel all ready exists at the Huntington Metro station, from what I understand). The study calls for it to be underground, which I would assume would be cut-and-cover since that is the cheapest option. My problem with the Metro extension is that beyond Hybla Valley, it is BRT (either Curb- or Median-running) which I do not think will support the level of development needed/that will happen along the Rt. 1 corridor.

by Thad on Jul 18, 2014 11:37 am • linkreport

@Jasper: Note I specifically said "do some electrification, rationalize the schedule and start running more frequently, and turn VRE into something much more useful than a mere 'commuter' railroad."

Extending Metro screws everyone else.

by Low Headways on Jul 18, 2014 11:38 am • linkreport

Dizzy,

Ok. New plan for the Georgetown BID. Start a campaign for a new ANC2E commissioner who doesn't have a crazy reason for keeping sidewalks pitifully narrow.*

*yes I'm being sarcastic about the campaign. Not about the sidewalks though.

by drumz on Jul 18, 2014 11:41 am • linkreport

@ Richard:If the route 1 corridor could support 6-8 car trains every 6 minutes then they should definitely find the cash for metro rail
but with the development on the rte 1 corridor, and the development that is likely to be there for the next 50 years, it cannot fill 6-8 metrorail cars. That's a lot of people

US-1 is very congested there. And so is I-95. That is a lot of people. Furthermore, Fairfax should be learning from Tysons and start building up around that corridor. Just change the zoning from 'infinite retail' to 'infinite retail with many floors of housing and offices on top'. Make sure you avoid building luxury apartments, and aim are apartments and condos that can be afforded by those with half to twice the median salary in that area (noting that South Fairfax is the less affluent corner of the county).

Considering US-1 is a stripmall all the way from Maine to Miami you should be able to extend metro to the Miami metro, and VRE to their trirail system.

by Jasper on Jul 18, 2014 11:54 am • linkreport

Extending Metro screws everyone else.

How?

by Jasper on Jul 18, 2014 11:55 am • linkreport

@DaveG:
The NC law is probably unconstitutional as it prevents citizens from voting on whatever issue they want to.
Under what provision of the Constitution would the North Carolina law be unconstitutional?

North Carolina is a Dillon's Rule state. Local jurisdictions only have the powers devolved to them by the state.

Even in initiative-happy California, you still have to meet certain rules to get an issue on the ballot. In no state has the Court ever ruled that people have a right to vote on whatever they want to vote on.

In Georgia, for example, the state sets a cap on the sales tax that can be levied in any county at 7%. The State itself collects a 4% sales tax, and counties are allowed to impose up to 3% on top of that.

There are 5 categories of sales taxes that can be chosen from. So if a county is already at 7% and they haven't imposed an Education SPLOST, tough cookies. They can't go over the cap. They don't even get to vote.

It's perfectly legal. If North Carolina doesn't want to give their counties the authority to raise sales taxes above a certain rate, they don't have to. And counties are not sovereign like states are. They only have the authority given to them by their state.

by Matt' Johnson on Jul 18, 2014 11:56 am • linkreport

Well, CaBi is getting some new docks, and they've already installed some (at least one in Georgetown on Water Street). But I suspect there will be a pause after these are installed.

http://www.thewashcycle.com/2014/07/10-more-cabi-stations-headed-mostly-to-downtown-dc-this-month.html

by David C on Jul 18, 2014 11:57 am • linkreport

US-1 is very congested there. And so is I-95. That is a lot of people.

It is indeed congested, congested with cars. Cars whose travelers may or may not be heading into DC/places where the metro goes. The problem is that too many of those people are not heading to places where the metro goes/would not take metro even if it does go where they are going.

Road Traffic =/= potential passengers


Furthermore, Fairfax should be learning from Tysons and start building up around that corridor. Just change the zoning from 'infinite retail' to 'infinite retail with many floors of housing and offices on top'. Make sure you avoid building luxury apartments, and aim are apartments and condos that can be afforded by those with half to twice the median salary in that area.

I agree they SHOULD be learning and increase the density of the corridor to make a more urban design, doesnt mean they will. Also in our capitalist economy we can talk a lot about how developers should build their apartments, but until we change to a state planned socialist model, we are stuck with what is the most profitable venture.


Considering US-1 is a stripmall all the way from Maine to Miami you should be able to extend metro to the Miami metro, and VRE to their trirail system.

Having driven it nearly end to end, I can assure you it wont work.

by Richard on Jul 18, 2014 12:10 pm • linkreport

Extending Metro screws everyone else.
How?

Extending the metro where it cannot generate ridership sufficient to support it, screws everyone else as it wastes capital money that could extend the metro to some place that could support it.

Extending the metro where it cannot generate ridership sufficient to support it, screws everyone else by raising the maintenance costs of the system without increasing revenue which will either raise taxes on everyone else or raise ticket prices for those who ride metro.

Extending the orange line down 66 will fill trains with mega commuters and leave no space for people in the Rosslyn-Ballston corridor to get on to get to DC.

Extending the metro to places where it cannot generate ridership screws everyone in the country who takes mass transit, as it will just become a boondoggle for antimass tranist folks to point at and say "see it didn't work there, total waste of money."

by Richard on Jul 18, 2014 12:16 pm • linkreport

CABI is a real trouble.

Not really. Even if no other BIXI bikes are ever built, CABI will be able to carry on for quite a while without problem. They can even expand by buying up smaller systems and bringing them here.

In December or January they promised DDOT a backup plan. There is none, apparently.

It's not apparent to me. DDOT got 10 new docks just this month.

I think there is a very decent chance we won't ever see BIXI style bikes being made again.

I would say there is a very high chance we will. Alta says they expect new bikes in 2015. And the streetsblog post notes that "The good news is that the troubled supply chain for Alta’s bike-share systems looks like it will be rebooted thanks to an infusion of capital."

Who owns the IP to it is unclear.

Bruno Rodi owns it. "Bixi’s most valuable assets at this point are likely the patents it holds with respect to the design of bike-share bikes and other hardware."

Replaceing the entire system would be another huge capital expense.

It all has to be replaced eventually anyway.

nobody was asking these questions about Alta and their ability to deliver bikes at the beginning.

This comments implies a great deal of knowledge about the negotiations between Arlington County and Bixi to which I doubt many people on here were privy. Alta was not involved in the decision to use Bixi bikes, but was only brought in AFTER Bixi was selected. So there would be no reason to ask these questions of Alta.

As I recall, the BAC did ask these questions of DDOT. They said that because Arlington had negotiated this deal, they couldn't really change it much, but that DC law requires agencies to show many things about suppliers - one of which is that there is a reasonable amount of risk that the supplier will be able to supply for a certain window. In 2009, I think Bixi would have easily passed such a review.

I don't think they were designed to deal with salt in the winter

They were originally designed for Montreal, so that would be a surprise. And a factoid that has never been reported.

by David C on Jul 18, 2014 12:17 pm • linkreport

David C; as you know, they pull the system in Montreal during the winter. The lack of proper painting on the dock bases is more evidence of that.

And you know the new Alta bikes+docks are not BIXI style. Whether they are compatiable is on open question.

I'm glad the BAC raised these questions. However, if I was a DC councilmember, there are certainly some questions regarding Alta that need to be answered.

You're absolutely right other systems could be cannibalized. I'd also suggest terminating the Rockville contract and the stations EOTR and bringing them back into the core.

It is an open question on how has the IP. The suppliers and Montreal were both creditors, and there was some sort of side deal between Montreal and BIXi before the court proceedings.

by charlie on Jul 18, 2014 12:34 pm • linkreport

Extending the Orange line further will just exacerbate the problem we already have at the Rosslyn tunnel. It's bad enough that the Silver Line will soon make things worse. Until VA commits to helping to fund a new river crossing, we don't need any more Orange Line stations.

@Low Headways

VRE extension is a much better idea in the near future than extending the Orange Line.

by Brett on Jul 18, 2014 12:39 pm • linkreport

@Low Headways

Extending Metro any further without expanding access to the core is ridiculous. An investment in VRE both in an extension to Haymarket and, sometime in the distant future, electrification, will provide a likely quicker alternative to Metro and another option if there are delays. With the expansion of the Long Bridge coming in the next few years, it makes sense to have think about expanding VRE now.

by Randall M. on Jul 18, 2014 12:43 pm • linkreport

However, if I was a DC councilmember, there are certainly some questions regarding Alta that need to be answered.

Ok. Noted.

It is an open question on how has the IP.

I don't believe that is correct.

by David C on Jul 18, 2014 1:03 pm • linkreport

A: Obviously it's best to work on core capacity before extending the orange line. Just so we're clear that I'm aware of this.

B: That said, VRE and the Orange Line serve completely different areas. Especially in Fairfax (Fair Oaks and Centreville).

And they've been talking about VRE to Gainesville and possibly Haymarket for a long time.

C: So we should do both.

by drumz on Jul 18, 2014 1:13 pm • linkreport

@ Richard:Extending the metro to places where it cannot generate ridership screws everyone in the country who takes mass transit, as it will just become a boondoggle for antimass tranist folks to point at and say "see it didn't work there, total waste of money."

Isn't that exactly the argument you are using here?

There is absolutely no reason to assume that you can not people out of their car into metro along the I-66 and I-95 corridors. There is also no reason to reserve transit to people already living near transit.

As a whole, transit in DC is massively underdeveloped. You can fairly safely extend transit in an direction where there is congestion and the opportunity for making a neighborhood denser.

Finally, a transit system not riding at full capacity is not a waste of money. We don't call I-94 in Montana a waste of money, even though there are never traffic jams there.

DC is a massively congested city. Transit is an efficient way to move people. Build transit along congested corridors and people will use it.

by Jasper on Jul 18, 2014 1:43 pm • linkreport

How does Muriel Bowser feel about gondolas?

by Crickey7 on Jul 18, 2014 1:56 pm • linkreport

I heard she is goo-goo for gondolas.

by The Truth™ on Jul 18, 2014 2:25 pm • linkreport

Extending the Orange Line is Fair Oaks Mall is the only scenario that makes sense from a cost/benefit analysis. Fair Oaks is a commercial center that will encourage reverse commutes from DC/Arl. The road network just west of Vienna Metro Station is very poor (No East-West roads north of I-66, Route 29/Route 50 combine together south of I-66).

by mcs on Jul 18, 2014 2:32 pm • linkreport

On the Rt. 1 corridor, I think that you can assume that many of those trips could be replaced with transit (either within the corridor or into DC). Additionally, extending the Yellow Line (or connecting to it with LRT) does not create the same problems that extending the Orange Line does.

by Thad on Jul 18, 2014 3:09 pm • linkreport

I think there are two bright points for driverless cars: 1 they present an elegant solution to the eternal last mile problem especially for the suburbs where transit and biking may be a poor alternative for many, and 2 they don't require local parking because they parked elsewhere, somewhat like car2go but without the need for a human to do the rebalancing.

by BTA on Jul 18, 2014 5:13 pm • linkreport

Does Fair Oaks have the space for a large garage complex, which is typically built at an end of line station? If not we would be attempting to build up Fair Oaks as a major development center (upzoning needed?) and keep Vienna as a parking oriented station. Which means the park and ride folks would still be on 66 to Vienna.

I am skeptical of an OL extension that does not go out to Centreville, and I think we are not ready for that (due to core limits and the County's strategy to focus dense development on the SL, rte 1, etc) till past 2050.

Meanwhile I think the solution they appear to be proceeding with is right - managed lanes with BRT features on I66, and VRE to Gainesville. I suspect the next points of controversy will be the nature of the managed lanes PPP - how much of the whole project will be financed from the tolls, and how extensive the BRT features will be.

Note a big advantage of BRT over metro for this corridor is the possibility of a one seat ride to Tysons.

by AWalkerInTheCity on Jul 20, 2014 7:49 am • linkreport

Oh and the other debate will be whether to add any free lanes to I66 or not.

by AWalkerInTheCity on Jul 20, 2014 8:29 am • linkreport

about the arlington and alexandria transitway

Michael Pope has previously suggested that Arlco and Alexandria are not on the same page on it, and they have made a point of making clear they are working together, so I would wait for a report from another source. There is of course no reason that they can't run the bus to Crystal City will running street cars as well. The presence of rails does not mean that buses cannot run in the same lane. And its likely there will be enough ridership to support both. That they have not worked out operational details is fine, considering there will not be rails there for several years.

by AWalkerInTheCity on Jul 20, 2014 9:01 am • linkreport

How much has this project costed - including federal money?

by asffa on Jul 20, 2014 10:58 am • linkreport

BTA - I think there are two bright points for driverless cars: 1 they present an elegant solution to the eternal last mile problem -
Yep, and hopefully there won't be an increase in expense based on number of passengers that fit in said vehicles, or it'll not be a good car replacement.
Metro is sold as the best option for DC tourists. But I was thinking today how tourists hope for a car rides into DC not only because the WMATA seems to have actual hate towards tourists based on their weekday evening and weekend schedules, but that the cost of a small group going in that would fit in cars is so much more expensive than it is for an individual, and there aren't group discounts.

by asffa on Jul 20, 2014 12:19 pm • linkreport

I think it's irrelevant whether the new bikeshare bikes are BIXI-style. Alta could easily use the type of bike being used for the Seattle bikeshare system. There's nothing revolutionary about the exact BIXI-style bike. It has some good design ideas for its intended use in a bikeshare system. But other companies can build similar bikes. Any new bikes merely have to be compatible with the docking system of the existing stations.

This is not complicated design work. A new bike simply has to be the same height as the BIXI bikes and the docking mechanism has to be the same height and width. The mechanism has some sort of heavy-duty electromagnet. BIXI didn't invent those types of magnets.

I think the fears about all the current equipment being obsolete are overdone. As someone noted above, the equipment will have to be replaced eventually. New equipment merely has to be compatible with the older stations and docking mechanisms. BIXI may have patents on specific features, but they did not design or invent the basic technology.

I'm not worried about the future of Capital Bikeshare. There might be a slight delay until Alta can transition the system to the new upgraded stations (with membership keys sold directly from the kiosks). If so, that will be an inconvenience. As long as the delay does not stretch out to several years, then I think CaBi will be OK.

by Citizen on Jul 21, 2014 1:53 am • linkreport

@AWalkerInTheCity

Fair Oaks has plenty of space for a parking garage. The mall has 8000 already. Based on comprehensive plan amendment, Metrorail will allow the Mall to increase density.

http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/dpz/comprehensiveplan/adoptedtext/2011-01.pdf

Beyond Fair Oaks, not enough density exists to warrant Metrorail. The road network to the west of Fair Oaks can handle the traffic for an end of the line station. We are talking about four miles of straight ballasted track and an aerial station to BRT station beneath ($200 Million) that could be implement during the reconstruction of I-66. Other than the Silver Line areas, Fair Oaks is the most dense area in Fairfax County.

Orange Line Metrorail extension to Fair Oaks will happen before any Yellow Line Extension along route 1. L'Enfant plaza (similar to Rosslyn) also handles 26 trains per hour.

http://goo.gl/YSqIIi

by mcs on Jul 22, 2014 12:03 am • linkreport

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