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Development


A big development in Woodley Park may spark DC's next housing battle

The Wardman Park Hotel in Woodley Park is set to get a major influx of new housing. Washington Post reporter Jonathan O'Connell pegs the project as the next big development battle in the District, and he's not sure the opposition will be justified.


Map of the proposed new building. Courtesy David M. Schwarz Architects/Gensler/Lemon Brooke.

Currently, the site at Woodley Park encompasses the Wardman Park hotel, the Woodley apartments and the hotel-condo Wardman Tower. But the DC Comprehensive Plan designates the entire site as high- or medium-density residential. That makes sense, given how close the site is to a Metro station.

Developer JBG has both short- and long-term plans for the site. In the next few years, it hopes to add an "eight-story, 120-unit multifamily building," according to the Washington Business Journal. The addition will include a large green space, and will sit between 2700 Woodley, an existing 212-unit apartment building, and the Wardman Tower.

The longer-term build out calls for replacing the hotel with almost 1300 new residential units, in four new buildings, with more than of 1200 parking spaces and 400 bicycle spaces.


The possible long-term buildout, including almost 1300 new residences. Map of the proposed new building. Courtesy David M. Schwarz Architects/Gensler/Lemon Brooke.

At build-out, the new buildings will have fewer units in them than the Wardman Park Hotel does today, and the big conventions and meetings will go away.

And yet, tensions over development are so high in DC that, Jonathan O'Connell, the Post's main development reporter, tweeted his expectation that this project will spur Woodley Park to become the next in a line of DC neighborhoods to oppose new housing.

Hostility to new housing has becoming increasingly common in the District. Vocal Lanier Heights residents recently won downzoning of that nearby neighborhood. In Northeast DC, Brookland is another front in the so-called "development wars."

"If everything were to go absolutely perfectly," said JBG's Robert Vaughan to the Washington Business Journal, the PUD would be approved by the second quarter of 2017, with groundbreaking to follow in the first quarter of 2018 and delivery by early 2020.

But with a project of this magnitude, even during an affordability crisis, that hardly seems likely.

Bicycling


Capital Bikeshare members ride here, bike lanes or not

Over half of the miles that Capital Bikeshare members ride are on streets without any sort of bike lanes. This map shows you which of those streets are the most popular:


Heat map of where Cabi members ride when there aren't bike lanes. Image from Mobility Lab.

Jon Wergin, of Arlington's Mobility Lab, put together the map after checking out data from GPS trackers on a number of CaBi Bikes, which showed what specific routes riders actually took between taking and returning a bike.

Wergin then separated data from riders who were regular CaBi members and those who were casual, less frequent users. Wergin's map focuses on the regular users, as the more casual ones overwhelmingly stuck to off-road paths close to the Mall and Monuments.

Only about 10% of DC's roadways have some sort of cycling infrastructure, but those routes still got about 1/3 of the bike traffic from regular CaBi members. Even more frequently, though, regular riders took the most direct route possible, which is why the long state avenues seem to have some of heaviest usage. Thick bands dominate Massachussetts, Florida, Louisiana, and Pennsylvania Avenues. M Street in Georgetown, K street near NOMA, and 14th in Columbia Heights also see heavy usage.

Some of these streets are due for new bike infrastructure in the next few years. Louisiana Avenue is slated for protected lanes that would connect existing protected lanes on Pennsylvania Avenue and First Street NE, and new bike lanes might also go in west of the White House.

But plans for Massachussetts and Florida Avenues are more vague. This map shows that DDOT may want to think about more specific plans for these and other roads since they're proving popular with cyclists, even without bike lanes.

What do you notice about the map? Tell us in the comments.

Public Spaces


The latest design for the new Third Street park in NoMa emphasizes kids and dogs

There's a park going in at 3rd and L Streets NE, in NoMa, and after nearby residents chimed in about what they did and didn't like about the first three designs, the architects put forward new plans. Out is dead space and a moat with a bridge, and in is more space for dogs and kids, and some variable topography.


The latest design for the Third Street park. Photo by NoMa Parks Foundation.

Landscape architect Lee and Associates' design includes a large space for dogs that is pushed up against the existing walls that abut the planned park and shifts space for children and adults, including a jungle gym-like wall-holla structure, to the area facing the streets.


An elevation from the latest design of the Third Street park looking south from L Street, with the wall-holla at the center of the park. Photo by NoMa Parks Foundation.

Stacie West, the director of parks projects at the NoMa Parks Foundation, says the updated design uses a lot of elements from the previous "The Wall—West" design and takes the mounds from the "The Mound" design.

The plan also adds a double gate for the dog park space and a water fountain for humans.

Specific lighting, plant and tree, and material selections will be made as the Third Street park moves through the design phase, says West.

The updated design was presented at a community meeting on June 11, with attendees saying that there was mostly praise for the plan.

Residents of NoMa have expressed desire for dedicated space for both dogs and children, something the neighborhood currently lacks. There have been questions about whether the Third Street park should be split between these two uses, however, the general consensus is that this is the best solution for the small, shady site.

"I'm going to be completely honest, this is a somewhat dark, small site," said Robin-Eve Jasper, president of the NoMa Business Improvement District (BID), in May. "It's a great site for a greatly designed small dog park."

"We need to think of this as a little jewel that's convenient for people in this area," she said.

NoMa hopes to begin construction of the Third Street park in 2017 and open it before the end of that year.

You can weigh in on the proposed design here.

Bicycling


DC is on the verge of ditching a harmful traffic law

Right now, DC has a law that keeps drivers from being held responsible for damages when they harm vulnerable road users. After years of organizing and effort, the DC Council is about to vote on a proposal to change this. You have a chance to speak up.


Photo by mjmonty on Flickr.

Traffic collisions happen every day. Sorting out who is responsible for the damages afterwards is a complex job that often involves the police, insurance adjusters, lawyers, and even judges and/or juries. In our region, however, a strict legal standard called "contributory negligence" has made things harsh, but simple: If you are even 1% at fault in a collision, you cannot collect any damages.

If that sounds weird to you, you're not alone. The District, Maryland, and Virginia are among the last holdouts in the US to use this standard. Forty-seven other states have switched to a more common-sense standard called "comparative fault," where damages are assigned in proportion to blame.

I shared my own personal story in a a recent post about how I came to learn about this obscure legal topic—the hard way, courtesy of a minivan driver, while I was riding my bike. While I am grateful I survived and recovered, I know I'm not alone, and others aren't as lucky as me with the court system. That's why myself and others have been advocating since 2014 for the District to adopt the "comparative fault" standard for pedestrians and cyclists who are hit by drivers.

Road users who don't have insurance adjusters or legal representation to advocate on their behalf are victimized a second time after a collision when their claims for damages are denied because insurers are confident most victims will not have the evidence to prove they are untainted by even 1% of fault.

Various DC Council members have explored legislation to make this change, but have faced stiff opposition from AAA and the insurance industry, who can afford multiple full-time lobbyists. However, patient and persistent advocacy from leaders on the council and community groups like WABA and All Walks DC have brought us to the brink of victory.

On Monday, the DC Council's Committee of the Whole scheduled the Motor Vehicle Collision Recovery Amendment Act of 2015 for a full Council vote on Tuesday, June 28, 2016.

On top of making it so a person on a bike or on foot who was contributorily negligent in a crash with a motor vehicle would still be able to collect damages if they were less than 50% at fault, the bill makes it clear that it covers people using non-motorized vehicles outside of just bikes (or people on foot), and retains what's called the "last clear chance" doctrine, which says that even if the person who was hit was contributorily negligent, the person who hit them can still be responsible if they had a clear chance to avoid the collision.

If you care about this issue, now is the most important time to let your councilmember know that you support fairness for pedestrian and bicycle crash victims. You can rest assured that they are hearing from the insurance industry, so let them hear from you too.

Transit


Ask GGWash: Why did the Cleveland Park Metro station flood?

During Tuesday's huge thunderstorm, the Cleveland Park Metro station flooded so badly that Metro ended up closing it for nearly two hours. Why was the flooding so severe?

The storm that swept across the region yesterday afternoon brought over an inch of rain to many areas in a very short amount of time. Here's how crazy things got at Cleveland Park:

Metro spokesperson Sherri Ly told the Washington Post that the reason the Cleveland Park station got hit so bad is that it "...is prone to flooding because it is at the bottom of a hill."

But that's not quite true: many areas east of the Metro station are farther downhill.

Greater Greater Washington contributor Matt Johnson says it's less about the topography of the area than it is about the amount of impervious surface (like roads, sidewalks, and parking lots).

Next to the Cleveland Park Metro, there's a parking lot to the east and buildings to the west. All of the water that falls flows into Connecticut Avenue (from downspouts from the buildings, and down the driveway aprons from the parking lot)—it has to go somewhere.

Near the intersections, some of that water may flow down toward Rock Creek, but there's a fixed amount of drainage volume that can be accommodated that way. The rest of the water gets collected by catch basins along the curb of Connecticut Avenue. Those also have a fixed capacity. Once the rainfall exceeds the ability of the street to drain itself downhill and into the catch basins, the water level will start to rise.

Once the water level rises above the level of the curb (between 4 & 6" above the pavement surface), it starts to spread onto the sidewalk, and will flow downhill, including into anything at a lower elevation than the sidewalk (like a subway station).

Then the water will begin to flow into the grates in the sidewalk that lead to underground vaults that hold things like transformers and Metro vent shafts. Additionally, water will trickle down the escalator and stairway into the station.

Metro has placed sandbags around the grates in the sidewalk near the Cleveland Park station to help keep water out. That works often enough, but not during Tuesday's storm.

"The level of water on the sidewalk had probably reached several inches high during the peak of the rain event, demonstrating how overwhelmed the catch basins were," says Matt.

"In other words, the water volume exceeded DDOT's ability to handle the runoff, so it began to flow into the Metro."

So is there any solution to keeping this from happening again? The sandbags help some, but there are some other options. In New York, MTA has raised the level of some street grates. And at the South Ferry subway station, which is in danger of tidal flooding during storms, MTA has added a few stairs that go up, before going down, at the entrance to the station.


NYC's South Ferry subway stop. Image from Wikipedia.

Transit


❤ Georgia Avenue's new red-surface bus lanes

DC's first bright red bus lanes now adorn four blocks of Georgia Avenue, near Howard University. DDOT crews added the red surface earlier this month.


Georgia Avenue's new red carpet for buses. All photos by the author.

The bus lanes run along both curbs, from Florida Avenue north to Barry Place. They speed Metrobus' busy 70-series line through what was the slowest section of Georgia Avenue north of downtown.


The bright red color is a strong visual clue to car drivers to stay out of the lane. It's a stark contrast to the Gallery Place bus lane a dozen blocks south, which is so poorly marked that many car drivers legitimately don't know it's there. For these four blocks, drivers will have no excuse.

Anecdotally, the red surface seems to be working pretty well. Most car drivers seem to stay out. To find out for sure, DDOT is in the process of collecting actual data, comparing the car violation rate now to the rate from before the red surface was added.

Nitty gritty

Cyclists and taxicabs are allowed the use the lanes in addition to buses. Signs along the street spell out the exact rules.

Since the lanes are along the curb, cars can enter them to turn right. Dashed white lane markings show where cars can enter.

To avoid wear-and-tear and to make the bus lanes safer for cyclists, the "red paint" is actually a gritty surface coating. If you walk along Georgia Avenue now, you can still see some of the leftover grit along the curb.

❤ the transit red carpet

By adding these lanes and marking them clearly, DC is taking an real step towards prioritizing street space for transit. At only four blocks long they're are a humble start, but a start nonetheless.

The "red carpet" is an increasingly common part of the street design toolbox in New York, Chicago, San Francisco, and Seattle. It's great that DC is getting on board too.

With more transit lanes in the works for K Street, H Street, and 16th Street, this humble start will hopefully soon become a trend. A red surface would probably help them all.


Yay!

Cross-posted at BeyondDC.

Development


Is DC "growing inclusively"? In 2005, it set out to.

Greater Greater Washington readers are reading DC's Comprehensive Plan, a document that lays out how we build our city, and discussing it as we go. Each week, we'll post a summary of the chapter we most recently read, along with some highlights of what our book club participants think about how the plan could change in the upcoming amendment process.

In 2005, DC's Comprehensive Plan was 20 years old and woefully out of date. The District undertook a major effort to rewrite the plan for DC's needs. This new plan opens with an encouraging vision: a growing, inclusive city. Has the plan actually helped DC grow inclusively?

Our book club discussed these questions as it read the first chapter, the Introduction.


DC Comprehensive Plan - Chapter 1

A big vision: planning to grow for all people

The opening statement of the Comprehensive Plan reads:

Growing inclusively means that individuals and families are not confined to particular economic and geographic boundaries but are able to make important choices—choices about where they live, how and where they earn a living, how they get around the city, and where their children go to school.
Growing inclusively also means that every resident can make these choices—regardless of whether they have lived here for generations or moved here last week, and regardless of their race, income, or age.
The emphasis on growing inclusively is important. This Comprehensive Plan was developed in the early 2000s, when DC's population had declined for 50 years and that trend was just ending. Since that time, DC's population has grown quickly, with more growth predicted for the coming decades. The language in this Introduction highlights the need to allow for this growth.

But will the city translate this vision into practice and actually grow in a way that welcomes people of all incomes?

The Comp Plan is a piece of a larger puzzle

The Comprehensive Plan is not the same as a prescriptive law. Its purpose is to guide the city's agencies and policies when making planning decisions. But it is not the only plan to do so.

The federal government (through the National Capital Planning Commission) creates its own "Federal Elements" about government land and property. DC also has many topical plans, like Sustainable DC, Move DC (for transportation), and Play DC (for parks). Finally, the Office of Planning is charged with periodically developing Small Area Plans, which address individual neighborhoods in more detail.

All of these other plans become part of the Comp Plan, and its more general policy statements are supposed to guide those plans. Theoretically then, growing inclusively should become a guiding principle for every planning decision that gets made in the city.


A plan within a plan... within a plan...

This 2006 plan was a big change from past plans

This version of the Comprehensive Plan was adopted in December of 2006. It was created because the previous version created in the 1980s was out of touch with the realities of the city.

Among some of the important changes was an entirely new way to organize the city. Previously, the Comprehensive Plan described the city based on ward boundaries, but because these boundaries shift over time due to population changes and politics, this plan delineates its own sections of the city, called Area Elements, to keep things consistent.


Area Elements Map of DC Comprehensive Plan

Another change was the high level of community input and engagement that took place to create the plan. Book club member Jane Dembner was a part of the consulting team for the Comp Pan, and shared that "this process was unprecedented in DC at that time" and was more strategic about engaging diverse stakeholders than ever before.

Will this plan fulfill its promise?

Many book club members were enthusiastic about the plan's bold vision. Peter Casey said, "too often, organizations and governments move forward without a vision of what they want to move towards. It heartens me to see the city so intentional in its development and choosing inclusion as its guiding principle."

But, he continued, "talking about inclusion is one thing, actually achieving it is anotherů In my mind, inclusion, more than anything else is the major challenge facing the District today."

David Alpert, too, reflected particularly about how this vision statement uses the language of "choices" and asked whether today we have the choices the plan calls for:

"In some ways, choices have really expanded in 10 years - people have more transportation mode choices, and there are more better schools including charter school choices, etc. ... But other choices have not expanded or have [even] contracted, like where to live. While many neighborhoods have gotten safer, more of the city is also out of reach of many people than was 10 years ago, and I don't think we are doing enough to ensure people still have those choices."
Yuki Kato wondered about "how this concept [of inclusivity] gets executed in the remainder of the [Comp] Planů It is possible that in some of the elements inclusivity is more easily conceptualized and executed."

Cheryl Cort, who was part of the task force that created the plan, noted it includes good concepts about "building an inclusive city, but now seems to lack urgency to address rising demand to live in the city, since the city grew much faster, and sustained its growth."

In summary, readers who shared their thoughts support the vision of growing an inclusive city, but wonder how it will be implemented. The problems we are facing today are generally magnified and more acutely felt than they were in 2006, especially in terms of housing. This amendment process is the opportunity to update the Comp Plan and make sure it reflects our city's current and future needs.

Can you be a part of the book club?

This week and next we are reading Chapter 2: Framework, and will report our thoughts soon. After that we move on to Chapter 3: Land Use.

Want to join us? We are 85+ and counting! Fill out the form below.



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