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Posts about Crosswalks

Pedestrians


Pedestrian deaths tripled in Fairfax County. Bad road design didn't help.

Eleven people on foot died in crashes in Fairfax County in 2015. That continues a rising trend since 2012, when the number was just four. What's going on?

NBC4 reporter Adam Tuss talked to some people about what's going on. A leading hypothesis in the story is that more people are walking around. That seems likely, but one element is missing: how poorly Fairfax's roads are designed for walking.

A number of people in the story talk about newcomers. One driver says, "I definitely worry about people who aren't from here," who try to cross when they don't have the light or not at a crosswalk. The subtext sure sounded like, "... people aren't familiar with the way we haven't designed roads for pedestrians in Fairfax County."

Just look at this intersection where Tuss is standing, the corner of Gallows Road and Route 29. It's about 0.6 miles from the Dunn Loring Metro station. And it's huge.


Image from Tuss' report.

That Target is part of the Mosaic District, which was designed to be walkable and transit-oriented. The interior is beautiful, but to get there from Metro requires walking along a not-very-hospitable sidewalk on 6- to 8-lane wide Gallows, and then crossing this monstrosity, 9 lanes on both Gallows and 29.

VDOT widened both roads in 2011 in a project billed to "increase safety, reduce congestion and enhance bicycle and pedestrian access," but which prioritized car throughput over other considerations. (This recent article from Joe Cortright effectively summarizes the mindset that would let VDOT think this would "increase safety.")

At least there are sidewalks, though, and you can legally walk directly along the road. That's not always true elsewhere in the county, like at Tysons Corner. Some sides of many intersections there were never designed for people to cross on foot. Only a lot of people are, now that Metro goes there.


Tysons Corner. Photo by Ken Archer.

Lucy Caldwell of Fairfax Police told Tuss, "We have situations that have occurred near Metro [stations], where people sometimes don't want to take that extra few minutes, and they cross where they shouldn't be crossing." If someone has to walk a few minutes farther to cross a road, most of all near a Metro station, you haven't designed it right.

To its credit, Fairfax officials are trying to gradually fix these spots, but there's a long way to go.

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Pedestrians


Construction has made a busy Silver Spring street dangerous for pedestrians

In downtown Silver Spring, a busy Georgia Avenue sidewalk is closed for the construction of a new apartment building. The signed pedestrian detour is very inconvenient, and many people are choosing to walk in the travel lanes of the road instead.


A pedestrian walks in the right lane of northbound Georgia Avenue rather than using the inconvenient detour. All photos by the author.

A couple weeks ago, Foulger-Pratt, the general contractor working on the new building, closed the stretch of sidewalk in the 8600 block of Georgia Avenue to begin construction on the site.

The closure is just north of the crossroads at Colesville Road and Georgia Avenue, the heart of downtown Silver Spring. A quarter mile from the Silver Spring Metro Station and very close to a number of high rise commercial and residential buildings, the area sees a lot of foot traffic.

While there is a detour for people on foot, it requires them to cross Georgia Avenue twice, along with Fidler lane, resulting in three streets crossings where there were previously none.


A map of the current detour pedestrians must take to get around the construction. Image from Google Earth.


Pedestrians opt to walk in the road alongside moving vehicles rather than using the signed detour.

Closing the right lane could allow for a temporary sidewalk

There's a simple way for the Maryland State Highway Administration to solve this problem: close the northbound right lane of Georgia Avenue to create a temporary sidewalk that's separated from traffic by barricades.

In the right lane of northbound Georgia Avenue where the construction is, on-street parking during the week is allowed except from 3:30-7 PM. Since many drivers are already accustomed to this lane usually being a non-travel lane, it shouldn't be much of an issue for the SHA to close this lane to create a temporary sidewalk.


The closed sidewalk, looking south. Note the parked car in the right lane beyond the construction zone.

While closing the lane may cause some delay at rush hour, doing so could also save lives.

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Pedestrians


Video: Crossing a city street should not be this dangerous

Crosswalks are supposed to make it safer to walk across a street, but they don't work if drivers don't stop or slow down. This video of my morning commute shows how scary walking can be, and why it's worth taking efforts to make crosswalks better.



Video of the walk across North Capitol at Pierce Street NE by the author. "Please pardon the Blair Witch Project-style framing," he says!.

Motorists in DC are required by law to stop when a pedestrian is in a crosswalk, just as if there were a stop sign. But morning commuters on North Capitol Street don't seem to know or think much about this law.

Every day, the 80 and 96 buses let off passengers by a crosswalk on North Capitol at Pierce Street NE. There aren't any signs reminding drivers to yield, and trying to cross the street to get to NoMa is something people do at their own peril. Check out the video to see what I mean.


North Capitol and Pierce Street NE, where the author shot the video. Image from Google Maps.

I didn't set out to film this video. I was more focused on crossing the street alive than documenting the experience. But I had my camera out and it just occurred to me to hit record since nobody would otherwise believe what I face every morning trying to get to work.

As you can see, drivers don't stop regardless of whether a person is standing in the middle of the intersection long before they get there. And that's even when cars may have to stop after they get through the crosswalk.


Wildebeest migration across the Mara River. Photo by jeaneeeem on flickr

In my 14 years here, I've seen DDOT add more prominent street paint, signs, and bollards, all of which I have to assume is to remind motorists to stop and to make streets safer.

For the specific problem I'm talking about, perhaps WMATA could move the bus stop to coincide with a traffic light one block south of Pierce Street at L Street. DDOT could also make the light timing accommodate people crossing instead of just motorists turning left. Either way, leaving a crosswalk there and no protection for anyone using it is a recipe for disaster.

As an occasional motorist myself, I know it's not fun to stop every few blocks when you're trying to get somewhere. But if we can learn to yield to people in crosswalks, we won't need a dedicated light or stop sign and everyone can get where they are going safely.

Another crossing that's particularly dangerous because drivers rarely stop is where Rhode Island Avenue NW meets 7th Street, right by the Shaw library. Do you know of others? Let us know in the comments. Maybe DDOT will take note.

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Bicycling


Check out Alexandria's efforts to make crossing a busy street on a bike safer

Sometimes called "bike crossings," intersection crossing markings that both tell cyclists where the safest place to cross a street and remind drivers to watch out for cyclists may be coming to Alexandria. Would what's planned for Alexandria make cyclists safer?


Photo by Ted Eytan on Flickr.

Bike crossings are part of the plan for the Wilkes Street Neighborhood Bikeway, which Alexandria Transportation Planner Hillary Orr (formerly Hillary Poole) unveiled in final, ready-to-bid form at November's Alexandria Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee meeting.

(Orr actually called these "bicycle crosswalks," but that's not the standard name, as it implies that cyclists should dismount and walk through them, which is incorrect.)

A bike crossing looks like a crosswalk with separate walking and cycling lanes. At Wilkes and Columbus Street in Alexandria, the plan is to use bike crossings to take the east-west bikeway from a shared street (a street marked with sharrows) to an off-street path.


The plan for Wilkes Street and Columbus Street. Image from the City of Alexandria.

According to Orr, the bike crossing comes from the National Association of City Transportation Officials guide. But the closest thing I found in the on-line NACTO guide was an intersection treatment for bike lanes:


Bike crossing detail from NACTO guide.

What Alexandria has planned more closely resembles a South Korean bike crossing than anything I found in the NACTO guide:


A crossing in Seoul, South Korea. Photo by Chris Rust.

Is it useful? Or just a distraction?

A street crossing that keeps people walking separate from those on bicycles would certainly be useful, if connecting similarly separated facilities, such as this off-street greenway:


Lane-separated greenway in Minneapolis. Photo by the author.

On Wilkes Street, however, bicycle riders are expected to move from a path people share for biking and walking on the west side of the intersection to street people share for biking and driving on the east, even though the bike crossing guides them towards the sidewalk.

At the BPAC meeting, people asked about the single bike crossing that's supposed to carry people over Wilkes Street's intersection with Route 1. Currently there is no bike crossing specifically for westbound traffic. This allows unimpeded flow of left-turning motor vehicles from eastbound Wilkes to northbound Route 1. The modified intersection will continue this practice.


The plan for Wilkes and Route 1. Image from the City of Alexandria.

When asked why a separate crossing was not added to facilitate westbound bicycling, Orr said it was "for safety."

In the new configuration, as in the present, westbound bicycle traffic is expected to cross to the southwest corner before either waiting for the northbound walk signal or proceeding west on the sidewalk. As in the current configuration, this design prioritizes car movement over cyclist safety. In previous discussions of this Bikeway, BPAC members specifically requested a direct connection to westbound Wilkes St for westbound bicycle traffic. Clearly, these requests were denied.

I left the meeting feeling that I was supposed to be impressed by the shiny new "bicycle crosswalk" but was instead disappointed with the second-class treatment of bicycling at the intersection with Route 1.

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Pedestrians


My godmother died where a new sidewalk design made her walk in traffic

A motorist killed my 95-year-old godmother while she was crossing the street near her Bethesda home last week. A recent traffic signal replacement makes people walk into a lane of traffic with a posted speed limit of 45 mph to get to the crosswalk she regularly used.


Map's base image from Google Maps, with labels by Ben Ross.

Marge Wydro frequently walked across River Road at its intersection with Springfield Drive, the residential two lane street where she lived. Here, River widens from a four lane divided highway into seven lanes. Her trip from her front door to the bowling alley at the Kenwood Country Club was about 300 feet.

In the past, Marge could walk (in the street) from her house on the first block of Springfield Drive to the corner with River Road. There, a curb ramp and sidewalk let her walk to the beg button (a button that must be pushed to get a walk signal) and the crosswalk across River.

River Road has sidewalks at the northern edge of the Westbard area, but they end about a quarter mile southeast of Marge's house. Farther out on River, the only sidewalks to be found are short connections between side streets and bus stops, like the ones at Springfield Drive.

But at the southeast corner of River and Springfield, the curb ramp and a piece of the sidewalk isn't there anymore. They went out as part of a project to replace the the traffic signal. In its place is a concrete curb with loose soil behind it. Frail walkers or people in wheelchairs are left no choice but to enter a traffic lane to reach the beg button and crosswalk. In the winter, when snow gets dumped on the corner, everyone's in that boat.


The sidewalk before and after reconstruction. The top image is from Google Streetview; the bottom image is by the author.

On the other side, after people have crossed seven lanes of River Road, they're met with more loose soil, weeds, a fire hydrant and utility poles. Here, a section of sidewalk skirts the crosswalk and the obstacles to connect the driveway entrance of the Kenwood Country Club to the bus stop a few feet southeast of the corner.


The Kenwood Country Club side of River Road. Image by the author.

Compounding the lack of safe access to the crosswalk and the fact that the crosswalk exposes pedestrians to seven lanes of traffic is the fragmented nature of the sidewalks on the side streets. The one short block of Springfield adjacent to River where my godmother lived is the street's only block without a sidewalk. On the other side of River Road, pedestrians like my godmother must share the driveway with cars to enter the country club. There's no direct paved connection from the sidewalk serving the bus stop to the closest country club building.


Marge Wydro. Photo by Bill Wydro.

The intersection poses an additional hazard to anyone not already familiar with it: the beg buttons are nearly impossible to see. On both sides of River Road, the buttons face south toward bus stops farther down the highway. With the new traffic signals, engineers have turned the buttons around to face the side streets. Now it's the bus rider's turn to miss the message that the traffic signals require a pedestrian to ask for permission to use the crosswalk.

We don't yet know the details of how Marge Wydro died, and it's possible we never will. But the engineering of this intersection subjected her to an entirely unnecessary safety hazard, which remains for anyone else who tries to cross here.

Tomorrow morning, County Councilmember Roger Berliner will join community members at the crash site to call for a redesign of this section of River Road.

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Pedestrians


Van Ness residents say their neighborhood isn't safe for walking

"My biggest concern at Van Ness is pedestrian safety. I feel my safety is constantly at risk," Benae Mosby said at a recent meeting of the Van Ness Main Streets board. As the communications and community relations manager at WAMU, whose headquarters are at Connecticut Avenue and Windom Place NW, Mosby walks this troubled intersection daily.


Connecticut Avenue at the Van Ness Metro station. All photos by the author.

It is an especially challenging time for Mosby and others on this stretch of Connecticut. On the east side, a one-block segment of the sidewalk is closed to accommodate the construction at Park Van Ness. On the west side, the entrance to the Metro has been closed since late June.

ANC 3F commissioners pushed DDOT to provide some relief to pedestrians, but to no avail. DDOT said it would add no second crosswalk on Connecticut at the south side on Windom (a few years after one of its own studies recommended one), and after adding a few more seconds to the crossing times at Veazey Terrace and Windom, DDOT said it would add no more.

With all this pressure on the intersections and pleas for changes falling on deaf ears at DDOT, a predictable outcome set in over the summer. The intersections became especially taxed in the morning rush hour, and pedestrians piled up and had a hard time getting through in a single cycle. Morning commuters, especially those traveling by bus to the Van Ness Metro stop, started taking more risks to avoid missing a walk cycle and potentially their train. Several could be seen crossing mid-block from the bus stop on the west side of Connecticut at Veazey Terrace to get to the Metro entrance on the east side.

As the problem grew, ANC 3F Commissioner Mary Beth Ray urged police action to deal with these hazardous crossings.

Police tried to make things safer

On Thursday, August 13th, MPD put up a yellow tape barricade to block mid-block access to the Van Ness Metro station. Officers were also handing out brochures and talking to pedestrians.

But by the next morning, the tape had been torn away. The next week, MPD tried another tack: Placing the tape where bus passengers are most tempted to cross.

These are short-term measures that do not address the real problem: The infrastructure is unfriendly to pedestrians, and right now it looks like DDOT would rather pedestrians bear the safety risk than accommodate pedestrian needs.

Metro escalator work has cut off what was a safer option

These hazards are what made the "secret" Metro passage under Connecticut Avenue, now lost to the escalator rehab project, so appealing.

"Metro has closed our 'secret' shortcut!" lamented Dorn McGrath, a long-time Forrest Hills resident who misses the safer underground route. "Pedestrians in the know wanting to cross Connecticut Avenue at Veazey Place could bypass the wait for a walk signal and the heavy traffic and cross in safety by using the Van Ness/UDC Metro tunnel. One could reach or depart from the Starbucks without having to rush across six lanes.

"Alas, the Metro entrance next to Starbucks is now closed and a pedestrian has no choice but to cross either through the heavy traffic or a block earlier."

To achieve Vision Zero, a lot has to change

Going back to Mosby's issue, even when the Metro entrance and Park Van Ness sidewalk reopens, the traffic and short crossing times will remain hazards to pedestrians at Windom and Veazey.

This will also continue to be the case at other Connecticut Avenue crossings, such as the one to the north on Albemarle Street. There, resident and seniors advocate Barbara Cline has seen car crashes, drivers running red lights,blocking intersections, speeding through an apartment building driveway from Connecticut to Albemarle.

Even with a new 25-year plan from DDOT that makes pedestrians the number one policy priority, the changes needed to make this a reality seem light years away. Photo enforcement can help, but the reality is that we live in a car culture, and pedestrians still need to push for changes to make room for us on the street.

Cross-posted at Forest Hills Connection.

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Pedestrians


DC will extend the 15th Street bikeway and add a pocket park, but crosswalks are still missing

DC's 15th Street NW protected bikeway will soon extend a few blocks north, past a dangerous intersection. The area will also become safer for pedestrians. But one thing is missing: a few crosswalks.


View on 15th Street near V Street looking toward the intersection with W Street and Florida and New Hampshire avenues. Image from Google Maps.

The current 15th Street bikeway lets cyclists ride in both directions from Pennsylvania Avenue to V Street, but north of there, 15th Street is one-way northbound. Someone wanting to get from the bike lane on W down to the bikeway has to ride a block in the wrong direction, use the sidewalk, or take busy 16th or U Streets.

The intersection where 15th crosses W Street, Florida Avenue, and New Hampshire Avenue is also a bad one for walking. A pedestrian was killed there in 2009. DC officials put in temporary barriers to extend the curbs, and promised a more permanent redesign. This is it.


Rendering of the proposed extension. Image from DDOT.

WABA wrote,

The final plans will extend the two-way protected bike lane from V St. NW to W St NW and will be separated from traffic by granite curbs. The bike lane will also incorporate curbed pedestrian refuge islands between the bike lane and travel lanes to provide a safe place to wait for people walking.
That's not the only improvement for pedestrians. Today, as drivers head north on 15th, the road divides gently into two, one continuing up the hill on 15th and the other going to W and Florida. That, coupled with 15th being a wide, one-way road with timed lights, encourages speeding in this portion to beat the lights at Florida.

The branch to Florida will go away and become a new pocket park. There will be a number of the planted areas that also retain stormwater, which have been popping up around DC. To turn right onto W or Florida from 15th, drivers will instead make a more standard right turn onto Florida, and then can turn right again to W.

Last year, planners hoped to extend the lane all the way up the hill past Meridian Hill Park to Euclid Street. That portion will have to wait a little longer, but this was a necessary first step.

What about the crosswalks?

Amid all this good news for people walking, there is one conspicuously missing piece, which you can see in this image Greg Billing tweeted from the community meeting. There are four legal crosswalks (which I've marked with red lines) without crosswalk markings.


Photo by Greg Billing on Twitter of DDOT presentation, marked up by the author.

If you're walking along the east side of 15th Street, you will have to detour all the way to the northeast corner of Florida and W (blue line in the diagram) instead of using the small triangular island. Now, it's true that this is what you would have to do today, but pedestrian-unfriendly design now is not a good reason to continue it.

According to DC law, all four sides of any intersection are legal crosswalks, whether marked or unmarked. That means it would be legal for someone to cross at the "missing" crosswalks. Traffic engineers sometimes push to leave out crosswalks because having people crossing the street would interfere with "traffic flow" more than they feel is appropriate, but people can still cross the street anyway.

DC now has a Vision Zero policy, which means it's a priority to try to eliminate any traffic fatalities. It's safer to slow down the traffic flow and let people cross instead of inviting a crossing without an actual crosswalk. And while it's legal to cross, people in wheelchairs, pushing strollers, and others can't take advantage of the legal crossing since there are no curb ramps at these missing crosswalks.

Billing asked about this at the meeting, and as he reported on Twitter, the team said "something about traffic movement, etc. But, the @DDOTDC project manager quickly realized that it should be possible."

DDOT spokesperson Keith St. Clair provided this statement:

DDOT believes the redesign of this complex intersection cluster achieves a very good overall balance between pedestrian, bicyclist, and vehicular traffic, safety and operations. The design of this intersection has been thoroughly vetted by the ANC and the community.

There are currently four unmarked crosswalks in the new design that are not accommodated with ramps, markings and pedestrians signal heads:

However, unmarked crosswalk A, on the north side of New Hampshire Avenue, is so close to the crosswalk running east-west on the south side of W Street that it is effectively repetitive of what already exists. To include unmarked crosswalk B, on the east side of 15th Street across Florida Avenue, would create hazards for pedestrians because the through and heavy right-turning vehicle traffic from northbound 15th Street move at the same time. Timing it to allow a protected crossing phase here for pedestrians would impact the signal timing of the whole intersection, resulting in delays for both vehicles and pedestrians.

The utility of unmarked crosswalks at C and D is not substantial given that the distance to get to the east or west side of the intersection to proceed southbound on New Hampshire or 15th is relatively short. Furthermore, if C and D crosswalks were marked and signalized, pedestrians would still have to cross east or west from the island to continue southbound.

The project is currently scheduled to start construction on Aug. 24.

This is "all too common" around DC

The triangle where New Hampshire Avenue meets 20th and O streets, just south of Dupont Circle, is also missing sidewalks to cross 20th along the north side of O, and to cross New Hampshire on either side of O.


New Hampshire Avenue and 20th and O streets, NW. Image from Google Maps.

This area was recently redone as part of a major reconstruction of New Hampshire Avenue which turned it two-way and added bike lanes—very welcome steps. The crosswalks were missing before the project, too, but it didn't make the situation better.

The same issue arose near Fort Totten, when DDOT removed slip lanes at a pedestrian-hostile intersection of Riggs Road and South Dakota Avenue. Initial plans left out a crosswalk so there could be more turn lanes; following community outcry, then-DDOT Director Gabe Klein had the agency reconsider.

Pedestrian Advisory Council co-chair Tony Goodman said in an email,

That's actually been a major focus of PAC discussions this year. From a pedestrian safety standpoint, there is no reason to not stripe a crosswalk on all four sides. It rarely makes sense for traffic operations either. It's a massive inconvenience and also can be quite dangerous to make extra crossings, especially for those with difficulties with mobility or vision.

This sort of situation is all too common in DC where an avenue meets a street. Those angled intersections often force pedestrians to deviate from their straight-line travel and hunt out what is essentially a permanent detour. Mass Ave in particular is horrible for that, all across its length.

What other areas do you know about that have missing crosswalks?

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Bicycling


Ask GGW: How do you cross a street if you're in a bikeway that runs against car traffic?

Some of DC's bikeways run in two directions on a street while the cars can only travel in one. Reader MacKenzie wants to know the right way to turn toward a destination that's on the opposite side of the bikeway.


Looking south in the two-way bike lane at 15th and Q Streets NW. Photo by Luis Gomez from Borderstan.

On 15th Street NW, the bikeway runs in north and south, but cars only go north.

I usually ride south on 15th Street NW, and then need to turn left onto Q. There is a little left turn lane, but I'm never sure if I am supposed to wait until the light for Q Street is green, or if I can go as long as no one is coming, like a driver turning left on a road with two way traffic would. What's the proper way to do this?

For MacKenzie's scenario, the Washington Area Bicyclists Association suggests a "two-stage turn" onto Q Street from the 15th Street bikeway.


Example of a two-stage turn. Image from DDOT.

That means when there's a green light on 15th Street, continue through the intersection to the southwest corner. Then wait in extra space that is not the crosswalk or within the 15th Street bike lane, with the bike facing east on Q Street. Then proceed on Q when the light changes.

A two-point turn is also an option for those riding bikes north on 15th. But since riding north means riding with the flow of car traffic, it's also OK to merge across 15th to turn right on Q.

Do you have a question? Each week, we'll pose a question to the Greater Greater Washington contributors and post appropriate parts of the discussion. You can suggest questions by emailing ask@ggwash.org. Questions about factual topics are most likely to be chosen. Thanks!

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Pedestrians


The neighborhood where everybody "jaywalks"

When I moved to East-West Highway in South Silver Spring last fall, I quickly noticed one thing: people cross the street without using crosswalks all the time. Even as the surrounding area becomes more urban and walkable, this street remains a relic of its industrial, car-oriented past.


Drivers stop to let a man and his dog cross East-West Highway. All photos by the author.

East-West Highway was built in the 1920s to connect Bethesda and Silver Spring and provide an alternative to Military Road in the District. (An extension to Prince George's County came later.) Industrial uses like bottling plants, commercial bakeries, and repair shops sprouted up along the road in Silver Spring. When the Blairs complex was built in the 1950s, the developers purposefully faced it away from East-West Highway because it was so unattractive.

When the redevelopment of downtown Silver Spring took off about 10 years ago, those buildings gave way to apartments and condominiums. More recently, businesses including Denizens Brewing Company, Bump 'N Grind, a coffeeshop/record store, and Scion, a restaurant based in Dupont Circle, have flocked to the area.

South Silver Spring is now one of the region's youngest neighborhoods, with a large number of transit commuters. Even the owner of the Blairs is embarking on a redevelopment plan to face the street again.


Parents run across East-West Highway with their kid.

As Silver Spring redeveloped, it became more walkable. But East-West Highway never caught up.

Even though it's fairly narrow, it's still designed like a high-speed commuter route, even as more and more people are walking and bicycling in the area. In some places there are no sidewalks, and the two crosswalks between Georgia Avenue and Colesville Road are each a quarter-mile apart, at least a five-minute walk. Even when you get to a crosswalk, the signals are timed to move cars through, making pedestrians wait for up to two minutes to cross.


People line up to cross East-West Highway at one of the few stoplights.

So people choose to cross where it feels convenient, or safer. In four months of non-scientific observations, I noticed that everyone seemed to cross in a few specific places. I started crossing there as well, and realized that most drivers will stop for you. And when I drove out of my building's garage, I always waited before turning, knowing that someone might be crossing.


Where to cross East-West Highway. Stoplights are in red, popular informal crossings are in blue. Click for an interactive map.

But this isn't ideal. A century of training people not to walk in the middle of the street means that nobody, including drivers, expects this to happen. Thus, informal crossing points aren't as safe as formal, designated places to cross that pedestrians, bicyclists, and drivers can all recognize. And the unpleasant experience of walking in South Silver Spring depresses foot traffic, which hurts both existing businesses and prevents new ones from opening.

Even if it wasn't built for walking, East-West Highway became a place with lots of walkers. It's time for this street to adapt. More crosswalks would be a good start, as would filling in the missing gaps of sidewalk. More stoplights, or pedestrian-only signals called HAWKs, would be even better, as would a median where people could wait while crossing.

Yes, these things might cause additional delays for drivers. But as one of those drivers, I'd rather have a slower, safer street with more places to shop and hang out. As its surroundings become more urban, East-West Highway is a highway in name only.

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