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Posts about Development

Transit


What's so great about the Purple Line, anyway?

With a recent court decision from a group of opponents delaying the Purple Line once again, it's easy to forget how many people support it, from local environmental groups to Governor Hogan. Let's remember why they fight for this project, and why it will get built one day.


This will get built. Image from Montgomery County.

The Purple Line will be a 16-mile light rail line between Bethesda and New Carrollton. It'll connect three Metro lines, all three MARC commuter rail lines, and Amtrak, as well as hundreds of local bus routes. It'll serve two of the region's biggest job centers, Bethesda and Silver Spring, as well as Maryland's flagship university. It'll give Montgomery and Prince George's counties a fast, reliable alternative to current bus service and Beltway traffic.

However, it'll do a lot more than that.

1) It'll make walking and bicycling a lot easier and safer. The Purple Line project includes rebuilding or extending trails across Montgomery and Prince George's counties, building on the area's growing bike network.

The Capital Crescent Trail, which ends two miles outside of Silver Spring, will get fully paved and extended to the Silver Spring Metro station, where it'll connect to the Metropolitan Branch Trail. The trail will get a new bridge at Connecticut Avenue and new underpasses at Jones Bridge Road, and 16th Street, so trail users won't have to cross those busy streets.


Wayne Avenue in Silver Spring will get a new trail. Photo by the author.

Streets in other parts of the corridor will get rebuilt with new sidewalks and bike lanes. University Boulevard in Langley Park will get a road diet. Wayne Avenue in Silver Spring will get a new, extended Green Trail.

2) It will let more people live and work near transit more affordably. Metro has its problems, but people still value living in walkable, transit-served neighborhoods. As a result, communities with Metro stations can be very expensive. The Purple Line puts more neighborhoods and more homes near transit, as well as more opportunities to build new homes near transit, helping meet demand and fighting spikes in home prices.


How far you can get by transit from Riverdale today and after the Purple Line is built.

3) It will improve commutes far beyond Bethesda to New Carrollton. The Purple Line will dramatically improve transportation access for people who live or work near one of its 21 stations. But even those whose homes or jobs aren't near the Purple Line may travel through the corridor, getting a faster, more reliable trip.

Right now, a bus trip between Silver Spring and Bethesda can take 20 minutes at rush hour (though in reality it takes much longer due to traffic). On the Purple Line, that trip would take just nine minutes. That's a time savings for anyone passing through the Purple Line corridor, like if you were going from Riverdale (which will have a station) to Rock Spring Business Park in Bethesda (which won't).

4) It's finally bringing investment to some of our most disadvantaged neighborhoods. Communities like Long Branch, Langley Park, and Riverdale have long awaited the kind of amenities more affluent communities take for granted. When Maryland and the federal government agreed to fund the Purple Line, people took notice. Long Branch businesses formed an association.

Riverdale residents and business owners are pushing for a more attractive station. A few blocks away, this ad for a new house being built lists exactly one feature: "located within steps of purple metro line's Beacon Heights Station (officially approved by state of Maryland for 5.6 billion)."

While the Purple Line can help meet the demand for transit-served housing, there are real concerns that home prices may still rise, resulting in gentrification and displacement. That's why residents, business owners, and the University of Maryland partnered on the Purple Line Community Compact, which creates a plan for ensuring that people can afford to stay.

5) We actually don't know everything the Purple Line will do. Transportation planners can estimate how many people will use a transit line, but we can't predict how it will affect people's decisions about where to live, work, shop, or do other things. That's the most exciting part.


Metro helped revitalize Silver Spring. The Purple Line can do this for more communities. Photo by the author.

Metro helped make 14th Street a nightlife destination. It turned Arlington into an economic powerhouse. It transformed Merrifield's warehouses into townhouses. Those changes weren't guaranteed, but as a region we took the risk and it paid off.

We're poised to do the same thing for a new generation of neighborhoods along the Purple Line.

While a recent lawsuit from a group of Chevy Chase residents will has halted the project, transportation officials seem hopeful that this will be a temporary delay. The facts remain that this is a strong project that has major benefits for Maryland.

That's why everyone from environmental groups to neighborhood groups to business groups support this project. That's why Governor Hogan agreed to build it, even if he did make some changes to save money.

And that's why, despite a small but vocal opposition, it will get built.

Development


DC's Edgewood neighborhood is set to get more affordable housing and connections to the Met Branch Trail

Plans for a massive new development planned along Rhode Island Avenue NE include affordable housing, new connections to a large nearby apartment complex, and links to an important bike trail.


An elevation showing the first phase (completed, on the right) and later phases (outlined in white) of the planned Rhode Island Center development. Image by MRP Realty.

Rhode Island Center is a roughly 1,600-residential unit mixed-use development that will rise on the site of the Big Lots and Forman Mills between the Metropolitan Branch Trail and 4th Street NE.

This is the ideal transit-oriented development for the region: lots of housing, both affordable and market rate, a block from the Metro on a site that is currently a suburban-style strip mall. To top it off, it includes needed pedestrian and cycling improvements to the surrounding area.

Developer MRP Realty plans to include about 128 units in the District's Inclusionary Zoning program, build new stairways up to Edgewood Commons on the hill above it, make improvements to the MBT, install two new Capital Bikeshare docks and provide residents $225 in incentives towards alternative transportation options, like a bikeshare or carshare membership, a benefits package submitted to the DC Planning Commission on 1 August shows.

Affordable housing

The project will be built in phases, with the first two buildings fronting the MBT scheduled to open in 2019, confirms MRP's vice-president of development Michael Skena in an email. Phase one will include about 450 units, with 8%, or about 36 units, set aside for affordable housing.


Looking south at the first phase of Rhode Island Center from the MBT. Image by MRP Realty.

Half of the affordable units will be for households of four earning up to $54,300 a year, or 50% of the DC region's area median income (AMI), and half for similarly sized households earning up to $86,880, the DC Department of Housing and Community Development's (DHCD) 2016 inclusionary zoning schedule shows. Rents for two-bedroom apartments are capped at $1,222 a month and $1,955 a month, respectively, for the two income groups.

The affordable housing in Rhode Island Center's later phases will see slightly more units going to needier families, with 5% for those in the lower income bucket and 3% in the higher one.

The income levels for both the first and later phases of the development will be set if they are approved by the Zoning Commission on September 12, says Skena, even if the DC Council passes a pending change to the IZ program lowering the maximum household income level to 60% of AMI.

However, commissioners from ANC 5E, which oversees the area including Rhode Island Center, declined to support the development unless MRP includes nearly double the number of units, 14% of the total, in the IZ program at 60% of AMI, in a letter to the Planning Commission dated July 7.

While further changes to the affordable housing component in the development are possible before the September hearing, they are unlikely to include any units at the lower household income level sought by the ANC.

In July, the DHCD objected to a proposal that affordable units be available to households earning up to 60% of AMI in the Eckington Yards development. While the main objection was to a request by the developer to administer the units itself outside of the agency's IZ program, the agency emphasized a need for developers to be held to all the District's existing laws and regulations.

Current regulations require that units in the IZ program are available to households earning up to either 50% or 80% of AMI.

Stairways and connections

MRP promises to build two new stairways between Edgewood Commons and Rhode Island Center. This would provide residents of the apartment complex with a new direct connection to the MBT and Rhode Island Ave Metro station, eliminating the current about half-a-mile journey through the existing shopping center and up 4th Street.


The planned stairway connecting Edgewood Commons to the MBT. Image by MRP Realty.

The first stairway, which would be located in the northeast corner of the development adjacent to the trail, would be built with the first phase. The stairs would be closed between 1 am and 4:30 am on weekdays, and 3 am and 6:30 am on weekends.

Easier access to the Metro and trail would benefit residents of the mixed-income Edgewood Commons community. It would improve connections between the complex and the east side of the neighborhood, and potentially increase economic opportunities for residents. For example, the time it takes to walk to the shopping center with Giant Foods and Home Depot would be cut in half.

Connections to the MBT are a big part of the Rhode Island Center proposal. The central artery through the project will stretch from 4th Street NE to a new plaza where the trail and bridge to the Rhode Island Ave station meet, and include a new protected bike lane.


Looking east down the central corridor through Rhode Island Center towards the MBT. Image by MRP Realty.

The developer will realign the MBT so it passes under the stairs to the bridge to reduce pedestrian conflicts in the planned plaza, and make other signage, wayfinding, landscaping and lighting improvements.

The benefits package also includes $10,000 for the connection between the MBT and Franklin Street NE, which was included in the NoMa Business Improvement District's MBT Safety and Access Study earlier this year.

MRP will install two new bikeshare docks as part of the package. One next to the trail near the planned plaza and one on 4th Street NE between Bryant Street and Franklin Street.

Development


Affordable housing agency surprises everyone by opposing more-affordable housing at one Eckington development

A large new development in Eckington will go up with fewer "deeply affordable" units than developers planned thanks to an unexpected objection from DC's Department of Housing and Community Development. The agency didn't want to have units doled out outside its existing system, even at the expense of some affordability.


Eckington Yards seen from Eckington Place NE. Image by JBG and Boundary.

At Eckington Yards, a 695-unit mixed-use development that will rise on a three-acre site stretching from Eckington Place NE to Harry Thomas Way NE in Eckington, developers JBG and Boundary wanted to offer more deeply affordable units—units for people who make well under the Area Median Income (AMI)—than what DHCD requires.

But the developer also wanted to manage the units on their own, with residents applying directly to them rather than to the agency's program.

"DHCD vigorously objects to the premise that IZ [inclusionary zoning] requirements can or should be waived," said Polly Donaldson, director of the agency, in a July 28 letter to Zoning Commission chairman Anthony Hood. "The fundamental issue before the Zoning Commission is… whether developers should be required to comport with existing law, policy and regulations."

Donaldson repeatedly emphasized that the issue was about maintaining "uniform application" of the District's affordable housing rules, and not an objection to creating more homes for lower income resident, in the letter.

In other words, the housing authority wanted JBG and Boundary to fit the affordable housing component of Eckington Yards into its existing boxes, with no exceptions.


The Eckington Yards development in relation to the surrounding buildings. Image by JBG and Boundary.

The Eckington Yards proposal

JBG and Boundary wanted to offer the 55 affordable units in Eckington Yards at 60% of AMI, which is $106,800 for the Washington DC region this year. Households that earn up to $64,080 would have been eligible for these apartments.

That proposal did not fit with the District's existing requirements that large projects make eight percent of the floor area available to people making 50% or 80% of AMI.

In her letter, Donaldson said that DHCD "strongly agrees with and supports" efforts to "provide additional affordable housing, at levels of affordability greater than the required regulations."

She pointed to other District programs, like low-income housing tax credits, that could be used to make housing in its existing IZ categories affordable at the level proposed for Eckington Yards.

DC's AMI requirements may change

Just two days before Donaldson sent her first letter to Hood, the Zoning Commission approved a change in the inclusionary zoning regulations that would lower the top household income level to 60% of AMI.

The rule change undergo a 30-day comment period and then go to the District council for a vote before it can enter into force.

Donaldson acknowledged the change, which would bring IZ requirements in line with the affordability envisioned for Eckington Yards, in her letter. However, she said that the application must be viewed under the "current versions of the IZ statute and regulations."

A compromise with less deeply affordable housing

JBG and Boundary compromised with DHCD in order to secure final approval for Eckington Yards. The Zoning Commission approved a revised proposal with the 55 affordable units split evenly between the housing authority's two IZ buckets at its meeting yesterday.

The compromise resulted in an average maximum household income of $70,590 for the affordable component of Eckington Yards, more than $6,000 higher than under the all-60% proposal.

While not a loss in the number of affordable units, it is a blow to creating more deeply affordable units in the community. Especially in a highly sought after location like Eckington Yards, which is walking distance to the NoMa-Gallaudet Metro station and adjacent to the Metropolitan Branch Trail and future large NoMa park.


Eckington Yards seen from the planned NoMa Green. Image by JBG and Boundary.

Development


DC's affordable housing fund isn't doing enough for low-income residents, an audit says

The District's Housing Production Trust Fund is a program run by the city to fund and build affordable housing, which helps some of DC's poorest families live in one of the country's most expensive housing markets. A recent audit, however, says that too little money is going to the lowest-income residents.


Photo by Kamesg on Flickr.

Every year, the District Department of Housing and Community Development puts all of the trust fund's money into a big pot, along with other federal and local funds earmarked for affordable housing. Then it puts out requests for proposals (RFP) to build housing using the money that detail exactly how it must be spent. Non-profit and for-profit groups alike apply for and get money from the fund.

According to DCHD, almost a billion dollars has gone into the fund since 2001, leading to the construction or renovation of almost 10,000 units dedicated to housing families whose incomes can be far below average.

The city's Office of the District of Columbia Auditor recently took a look at how HPTF money has been used since it was created, and how DCHD has accounted for that spending. The report says that while a lot of money has been spent to build or renovate housing units, far less money than what is required has gone toward housing for people who can afford the least.

Far more money was supposed to go toward housing for people who earn the least

By law, at least 80% of the fund has to be spent on helping finance construction for housing that's for households earning less than half of the Area Median Income (AMI). AMI is a tool used nationwide to decide how much a family needs to make to meet requirements for subsidized housing in a given area. The AMI for a family of four in Washington in 2016 is $108,200 a year.

Within that 80% requirement, half of money spent has to go towards housing for households making less than 30% AMI (i.e. a family in Washington that only makes 30% of $108,200 in a year, or around $32,000 for a family of four) while the other half focuses on households between 31 and 50% AMI.

But in 2014 and 2015, the fund simply hasn't spent all that much on that subcategory of housing. In 2014, only 32% of the fund actually went to housing households earning 50% AMI. 2015 was a bit better at 49%, but still far below the 80% requirement.


Table from the DC Auditor.

DHCD is working to fix the problem

According the audit, DCHD has a lot of work to do to catch up and meet its goals. The report recommends that DCHD and the advisory board make up for lost time by focusing only on housing families that earn less than 50% AMI for the foreseeable future.

"DHCD should consider compensating for the loss of investment in units for households earning 0-50 percent AMI during FY 2014 and FY 2015 by focusing all available funds on those two income categories for the near future," write the auditors.

In a section of the reports for comments from DCHD, the agency says that it has already started on a plan to get things back on track, and to ensure that the right amount of money goes toward those groups: "Beginning in fiscal year 2015, [DHCD] began issuing targeted requests for proposals utilizing the Housing Production Trust Fund with a requirement that the agency will only fund new construction projects targeting households with incomes of 50% of area median income and below."

To make sure the lowest-income families keep getting the funding they need, DCHD and the Production Fund will have to keep better track of their spending and reporting to the city's oversight agencies. The audit also revealed that several key reports that are due quarterly are simply missing, and that a lot of the fund's activities were classified under a general "other" category. That makes it hard for city auditors to suss out what money goes where.

The Housing Production Trust Fund is an important tool for the city to keep some of its housing affordable for individuals and families struggling with high housing costs in Washington. And after nearly being cut away to nothing in 2012, the fund saw a big infusion of nearly $100 million dollars during last year's budget process.

But all the money in the world doesn't matter if it doesn't get to the people who are supposed to be the beneficiaries. So now its up to the city's workers and elected officials to work together to fulfill the Housing Production Trust Fund's promise.

Links


National links: How do bikes work? We don't really know...

Physicists disagree on what exactly makes bikes work. Kansas City opened a streetcar line earlier this year, and it's doing really well. A number of US companies are moving parts of their businesses into downtowns but keeping other parts in less urban places. Check out what's happening around the country (and beyond) in transportation, land use, and other related areas!


Photo by Étienne F on Flickr.

Bicycles. They're a mystery: Even though bicycles have been around over 100 years, we still aren't sure about the physics of why they work. Two competing theories, the gyroscopic and caster, are still being debated. A new research lab could solve the mystery once and for all. (Fast Company Design)

A successful streetcar: Given the poor ridership numbers for a lot of new streetcar projects around the country, it might surprise you to hear that Kansas City's new streetcar line has exceeded expectations. It's averaging over 6,600 riders a day even though it's a relatively short line, it's free to ride and goes through an up and coming district, and there are extensions on the way. (Slate)

Moving downtown... kind of: Many US corporations have long preferred suburban headquarters, but a number of CEOs are moving their offices downtown in hopes of attracting high-skill workers. At the same time, some are keeping lower wage jobs in suburbs and smaller cities, leading to questions of equity. (New York Times)

Where are all the great urban spaces?: In the last fifty years, the US has slowed down on building small streets with human scale buildings, and there's been an explosion of sprawl. If city administrators want great urban places, they need to focus on non-auto transportation and streets that put stores, schools, homes, and churches within walkable distances. (Governing Magazine)

A home to grow old in: Universal design is a way of designing places for people of all ages and abilities. Having a gradual slope instead of steps so that wheelchairs can access a room is one example of the practice. Designers don't always apply the practice to housing, especially those building in bulk, but with so many people aging, it's becoming more necessary to create dwellings that accommodate people through all stages of life. A Seattle company that makes prefabricated housing is focusing on universal design. (Fast Company Design)

Redevelopment in London: For a long time, the area around King's Cross rail station in London was a mixture of banged up and dangerous. But over the last few decades, redevelopment around the district's old rail lines and canals have formed the centerpiece of a great urban place. (Travel and Leisure)

Quote of the Week

"Hoover's zoning program, however, was created specifically to facilitate master-planned suburbs on virgin land. It was never designed to work in existing, built-out areas. So it should come as no surprise that today's city planners struggle to shoehorn urban diversity into suburban zoning schemes that assume car-dominated mobility and a neat separation of uses."

Mott Smith and Mark Vallianatos in the Los Angeles Times, discussing why we need to stop zoning and planning in cities as if they were suburbs.

Development


Can anyone build affordable housing without public money?

The US has less affordable housing than it needs, and that's because of a fundamental problem: the cost of building and operating affordable units adds up to more than what those units bring in in rent. The Urban Institute launched a tool that illustrates this problem first-hand.

The tool, which uses housing data from the Denver area, summarizes the affordable housing problem while explaining the associated layers and technical terms in an intuitive, easy-to-understand manner. At the bottom right, you see a theoretical development whose cost changes based on the variables you, the theoretical developer, are facing.

The unsustainable math behind developing affordable housing

There are many costs that go into building affordable housing units. In developer speak, these costs are referred to as "uses." Uses include the cost of purchasing the land itself, the cost of construction, and future operating expenses (such as hiring and paying building staff), among other things.

How do developers cover these costs? The uses are funded through various sources such as debt (taking out a loan) and tax credits. However, there are limiting factors when it comes to both of these.

When developers go to take out a loan, the amount they get and the interest they pay is determined based on projections for how much revenue a building's rent will generate. But it can be tough to predict whether or not a building could wind up being vacant, or for how long. Obviously, if nobody is paying rent on a building a loan helped build, the lender is not going to be happy.

Tax credits can also help developers. There are variables involved in determining the amount of tax credit a builder is eligible for, such as the cost of land and rent prices. Even if a developer is eligible to receive tax credits, there's no guarantee they'll actually receive them because the funds are limited at the national, state, and local level.

Closing the gap

To close the gap between the cost of developing affordable housing and the revenue it generates, why don't developers just apply for bigger loans, increase the amount of units in a building (generating higher rental revenue as a result), or charge more for rent?

As described above, lenders determine the loan amount based on projected revenue, and for affordable housing, that revenue is low by its very nature. Building more unites would also means needing to make sure more unites are filled, and charging more for rent defeats the entire purpose of affordable housing to begin with.

The bottom line is that subsidies are the only way to close the gap between cost and revenue; they're the only way to build enough affordable housing. Such subsidies can come in varying forms, such as vouchers, more tax credits, and grants.

Emily Badger at the Washington Post sums it up pretty well:

To the extent that government should step in when the private market can't, affordable housing is a prime example. The larger problem, though, is that we hardly devote the kind of public resources to this market failure that it demands.

Bicycling


A passageway from the Met Branch Trail to Florida Avenue is a great idea. Closing it at night? Not so much.

Plans for a big development in NoMa include new public "bike lobby" that will connect the Metropolitan Branch Trail to Florida Avenue. As of now, though, the storage space and passageway won't be open around the clock, making it less useful and the trail potentially less safe.


An elevation of the planned South Tower at Washington Gateway with the proposed bike lobby. Image by MRP Realty.

The lobby, located inside the planned South Tower of the Washington Gateway development on the triangle between New York Avenue NE, Florida Avenue, and the MBT, will be accessible via automatic doors off the MBT. Pedestrians and cyclists will then descend take the stairs down to Florida Avenue and the Union Market area, developer MRP Realty said in its latest filing with the DC Zoning Commission.

The lobby would include bike racks, an air pump, a water fountain, and information about the trail and surrounding neighborhoods.


The proposed bike lobby in the Washington Gateway development. Image by MRP Realty.

"This connection is critical to creating a link that allows convenient access from the Eckington neighborhood to the amenities of NoMa and Union Market," MRP said in the filing.


The entrance to the proposed bike lobby from the MBT. Image by MRP Realty.

There is one problem: The lobby will only be open to the public from 6 am to 9 pm daily, confirms Matthew Robinson, a principal at MRP Realty, when asked about comments made at an Eckington Civic Association (ECA) meeting in May.

Limiting the hours of the connection would significantly hinder access to Union Market from the MBT, and further isolate the trail at night, heightening residents and users' existing safety concerns.

The MBT needs a full-time connection to Florida Avenue

Adding more access points to the MBT is something the NoMa Business Improvement District (BID) says will make the trail safer. It would increase the number of "eyes on the trail" by encouraging more people to use the facility.


The temporary entrance to the MBT from Washington Gateway. Photo by the author.

When NoMa BID studied how to improve the MBT, it also found that access from the trail to the popular and rapidly developing Union Market area was important to users and residents. The BID identified a connection through Washington Gateway as a good way to do this.


The proposal for a connection between the MBT and Union Market through Washington Gateway. Image from MBT Safety and Access study.

It's shortsighted to limit connections between the trail and any rapidly growing neighborhood. Thousands of new residents will eventually live in the many planned developments along the MBT and around Union Market.

An open-air bike lobby could work

One alternative for MRP to consider is to build the bike lobby as an exterior space, rather than an interior one.

A comparable example is the open-air passageway through 1350 Connecticut Avenue NW that connects the southern exit from the Dupont Circle Metro station to Connecticut Avenue next to Krispy Kreme donuts.


The pedestrian passageway through 1350 Connecticut Avenue NW. Photo by the author.

In NoMa, developer JBG has included an open-air pedestrian passageway through one of the planned buildings between First Street NE and Patterson Street NE as part of what's being called the NoMa meander.


The NoMa meander could include this open-air pedestrian passageway through a building. Image by the JBG Companies.

One issue with such a connection would be keeping the stairwell clean and clear. But this is not insurmountable, as many cities around the country maintain numerous public outdoor stairwells.

MRP wants to improve the trail

The developer plans to invest $150,000 in improvements to the MBT, including landscaping, lighting, and paving improvements. That's in addition to the $1.2 million that it has budgeted for the bike lobby, its zoning commission filing shows.

In addition, the developer says its plans for Washington Gateway include a gym, as well as apartments and balconies, that will face the MBT and help activate the space by increasing the number of eyes on the trail.

Development


Housing beats out office space in NoMa, which could mean more affordable units

A development in NoMa called Washington Gateway could bring 30 new affordable units to the area. They'd be part of a larger proposal to change course away from building office space and toward building residential units.


A rendering of the planned North Tower in Washington Gateway from the New York Avenue bridge. Image by MRP Realty.

Washington Gateway is the first major development in NoMa that you see if you come over the New York Avenue bridge on your way into the the District. Located on a triangular lot between New York Avenue NE, Florida Avenue and the Metropolitan Branch Trail (MBT), the first tower of the eventually three-tower mixed-use development, the Elevation, opened in 2014.


The Washington Gateway site, the location of the North and South towers is highlighted in red. Image by MRP Realty.

Developer MRP Realty is now seeking DC Zoning Commission approval to build the planned North Tower as a residential building instead of offices, and for the option to convert the planned South Tower to residential in the future.

The 16-story North Tower, which would front New York Avenue, would include about 372 units under the revised plan, the developer says in its latest filing with the zoning commission on 18 July.

MRP would designate 8% of those units for households with incomes up to 80% of area median income (AMI), or about $87,300 based on the AMI number for 2015.

While not a large increase in the number of affordable units to the area, the developer rightfully points out that none would be created if the tower were an office building.

When asked whether MRP had considered the impact of offering the units at 60% AMI at an Eckington Civic Association meeting in May, representatives of the developer said they had not looked at the "economics" such a move.

Housing is in demand in NoMa

Housing is hot in NoMa. The population of the NoMa Business Improvement District (BID), which includes Washington Gateway, grew to more than 6,000 people at the end of 2015. This represents a compound annual growth rate of more than 30% since 2008.

MRP says its 400-unit Elevation was fully leased within 11 months of opening in 2014 and remains fully leased with regular turnover, in its filing.

This is in contrast to office space in NoMa. The vacancy rate stood at 14.8% at the end of June, higher than for offices in any other neighborhood in the District, a second quarter market report by real estate firm Colliers International shows.

This is evident to anyone who has regularly waited for a train at the NoMa-Gallaudet Metro station, where riders have had a view of unfinished, empty office space immediately adjacent to the station and MBT for the past few years.

MRP still plans to build some offices, maybe. The 13-story South Tower is still planned as an office building, however, the developer says it may change this building to residential in the future as well.


Rendering of Washington Gateway looking from across Florida Avenue NE with with the planned South Tower on the right. Image by MRP Realty.
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