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Transit


Here are the answers to whichWMATA week 15

On Monday, we posted our fifteenth photo challenge to see how well you know Metro. I took photos of five Metro stations. Here are the answers. How well did you do?

We got 44 guesses on this post. A whopping 26 of you (over half) got all 5 correct. Great job!


Image 1: Rosslyn.

The first image shows the escalator shaft at Rosslyn station. This shaft is distinctive because the four escalators are split by an elevator, which ascends through them. When Metro opened the new elevator-only entrance, however, it this elevator was deactivated. A development atop the station site will soon demolish the top of the elevator, but it's not clear if WMATA will remove the remainder of the shaft. 37 people knew this one.


Image 2: Huntington.

These "County of Fairfax" seals are at Huntington station, next to the tunnel portals at the southern end of the station. There's one on either side of the tracks. The seals line up with the circular holes in the buttresses, which we featured in week 8. One clue there is the "end ATC" sign, which indicates that this is the end of the line. 36 got this one right.


Image 3: Columbia Heights.

The third image was taken at the eastern entrance to Columbia Heights station. The canopy that's visible here is unique to two stations: Columbia Heights and Petworth. The Kenyon Square building visible through the glass is the clue to narrow it down to Columbia Heights. 35 correctly guessed this one.


Image 4: Union Station.

The fourth image shows the cramped northern mezzanine at Union Station, looking down from the elevator landing on the commuter rail level. This mezzanine is unique because of its size and shape, necessary to fit it in under Union Station. The four flags show that this is a key station. 38 knew this one.


Image 5: White Flint

The final image is a picture of White Flint from 2009. This picture is looking south at the station from above the subway tunnel. The main clue here is the Nuclear Regulatory Commission building just south of the station. 38 correctly guessed White Flint.

Congratulations to the winners!

Next Monday, we'll have 5 more photos for you to identify. Thanks for playing!

Transit


Do you know the station? It's whichWMATA week 15

It's time for the fifteenth installment of our weekly "whichWMATA" series! Below are photos of 5 stations in the Washington Metro system. Can you identify each from its picture?


Image 1


Image 2


Image 3


Image 4


Image 5

We'll hide the comments so the early birds don't spoil the fun for the rest of you.

The answers will appear on Wednesday. Good luck!

Photography


Stunning streetscapes in the Flickr pool

Here are our favorite new images from the Greater and Lesser Washington Flickr pool, showcasing the best and worst of the Washington region.


U St. Photo by Clif Burns.


U St. Photo by disposablefork.


DC Bicycle Party riders. Photo by Joe in DC.


Mt. Pleasant. Photo by Aimee Custis.


Photo by disposablefork.

Got a picture that depicts the best or worst of the Washington region? Make sure to join our Flickr pool and submit your own photos!

Transit


Here are the answers to whichWMATA week 14

On Monday, we posted our fourteenth photo challenge to see how well you know Metro. Four of our readers took photos of different stations. Here are the answers. How well did you do?

We got 35 guesses on this post. 10 of you knew all five. Great work Aaron, AndrewB, Justin...., yest2kwasi, Sand Box John, Russell, Phil, Peter K, nativedc, and PieSuperPac!


Image 1: Brookland. Photo by Sand Box John.

The first image was taken at Brookland. The clue here is that the platform is curved. Only two stations in the system have a curved platform, and the context here is clearly Brookland rather than Silver Spring. 23 of you knew this one.


Image 2: Huntington. Photo by Peter K.

The second image was taken at Huntington. This is at the south end of the platform, where one regular-sized and two narrow escalators ascend to the southern mezzanine. I believe these are the only narrow escalators in the system.

But the real clue is the funicular on the left. This elevator is unique in the system because it does not ascend vertically. It ascends diagonally, just like the escalators. Only 15 of you knew this one, so it was the hardest to answer this week.


Image 3: Stadium/Armory. Photo by Peter K.

This picture shows the northern entrance to Stadium/Armory. There were three clues visible in this image. The yellow banner at the top is very distinctive, and says "STADIUM THIS WAY," pointing passengers to the correct exit for RFK Stadium.

The entrance itself is a clue, being unique in the system. Instead of ascending to a floating mezzanine, the escalators lead directly from the platform to a mezzanine in a different room. The unique feature here is that the opening for the escalators goes very high above the platform.

The third clue, just visible to the right is the junction indicator above the outbound track. These are present at each of the stations where trains split between lines.

31 people got this one right, the highest total this week.


Image 4: Farragut North. Photo by DC Transit Nerd.

The fourth picture was taken at Farragut North. While many stations have floating mezzanines, the one at Farragut North (for the exit to the southwest corner of Connecticut and L) is unique because of the buttresses that link the mezzanine to the vault wall. The other mezzanines are supported only by columns down to the platform. 18 of you guessed correctly.


Image 5: Grosvenor. Photo by Ben Schumin.

The final image shows Grovesnor station. This station is in an open cut, like White Flint, though the context here (no tall buildings visible to the north) demonstrates that it can't be White Flint.

We got a few other guesses for stations in cuttings, but they all have different roof types, which is a key to guessing the correct station. There are only 4 above-ground canopy types in the system (though that will increase to 6 when the Silver Line opens) plus a few unique designs.

26 of you guessed correctly here.

Thanks to Ben Schumin, DC Transit Nerd, Peter K, and Sand Box John for submitting photos! Thanks to all of you for playing.

Next Monday, we'll have 5 more photos for you to identify.

Transit


Can you guess the station? It's whichWMATA week 14

This week, it's time for a little something different on whichWMATA: Your entries. We picked the best five images from reader submissions. Can you guess the five stations these images depict?


Image 1: Photo by Sand Box John.


Image 2: Photo by Peter K.


Image 3: Photo by Peter K.


Image 4: Photo by DC Transit Nerd.


Image 5: Photo by Ben Schumin.

In the future, we'll have more reader submissions, so while you're riding Metro keep your eyes (and cameraphones) peeled for unique stations and architectural features.

We'll hide the comments so that the early birds don't spoil the fun for the rest of you.

The answers will appear on Wednesday. Good luck!

Photography


Patriotic in the Flickr pool

Thanks to all who responded to last week's call with great images of our region celebrating Independence Day in the Greater and Lesser Washington Flickr pool!.


Barcroft parade - Arlington. Photo by Dennis Dimick.


2nd and Rhode Island NW. Photo by Jamelle Bouie.


DC Bike Party. Photo by Joe in DC.


Photo by ianseanlivingston.


3rd and Rhode Island NW. Photo by Jamelle Bouie.


Photo by John Jack Photography.

Got a picture that depicts the best or worst of the Washington region? Make sure to join our Flickr pool and submit your own photos!

Transit


Here are the answers to whichWMATA week 13

On Monday, we posted our thirteenth photo challenge to see how well you know Metro. I took photos of five stations. Here are the answers. How well did you do?

There were 44 guesses on this post. Eight of you got all five correct. Great work FN, Sean Emerson, MZEBE, Peter K, Rob K, JayTee, Roger, and King Terrapin!


Image 1: Fort Totten.

The first image shows the lower level of Fort Totten, viewed from the mezzanine. The lower level of Fort Totten is unique in that it's partially above ground and partially below ground. The northbound train that's visible is emerging from the subterranean portion of the station. 32 of you knew this one.


Image 2: King Street.

The second image shows the north end of the platform at King Street. This entrance is newer than the rest of the station, and is at the end of an extension of the platform. The fences are there because trains don't stop at this section. The roof type (only present at King Street and Braddock Road) and dual elevators are both clues to the station's identity. 26 of you got this one right.


Image 3: Glenmont.

This image shows the bus loop at Glenmont station. This canopy is unique to Glenmont. The Ride On bus you can see at the left was a clue to help narrow down the possibilities. (I specifically waited to take the picture until the bus drove into the frame). 23 of you guessed correctly.


Image 4: Vienna.

The fourth image is a shot of Vienna station from one of the parking garages on the south side of the station. While this station does have the common glass and concrete peaked roof, it is clearly a median station, which narrows it to one of the four Orange Line stations along I-66.

The pedestrian bridges on both sides of the freeway, however, mean that this must be Vienna. West Falls Chruch and Dunn Loring only have a bridge to one side, and East Falls Church has an exit below the platform rather than above. 28 knew that this was Vienna.


Image 5: Rockville.

The final image was somewhat harder. This is a picture of an elevator near Rockville station. This elevator leads from Monroe Street to the pedestrian bridge that takes riders across Route 355 to the station. One clue to the location is the Brutalist Montgomery County Executive Office Building, visible at right. Only 11 of you guessed this one correctly.

Congratulations to the winners!

Submit your photos

Do you have a photo for next week's whichWMATA? If so, please email it to whichwmata@ggwash.org by tomorrow (Thursday) evening.

Include the station where you took the photo and the name you want credited as photographer. Any photos you submit must be photos you have taken personally, and by emailing us the photo, you give us permission to use and republish it.

Transit


How well do you know Metro? It's whichWMATA week 13

It's time for the thirteenth installment of our weekly "whichWMATA" series! Below are photos of 5 stations in the Metro. Can you identify each from its picture?


Image 1


Image 2


Image 3


Image 4


Image 5

We'll hide the comments so the early birds don't spoil the fun for the rest of you.

The answers will appear on Wednesday. Good luck!

Submit your photos

Next week's whichWMATA will feature photos from readers like you! Do you have a good photo for the contest? If so, please email it to whichwmata@ggwash.org. Include the station where the photo was taken and the name you want credited as photographer. Any photos you submit must be photos you have taken personally, and by emailing us the photo, you give us permission to use and republish it.

Please submit your photos by Thursday evening.

Photography


Holiday weekend in the Flickr pool

Who's ready for Independence Day weekend? As you head off to snap pictures of this year's fireworks, we'd love some images of the weekend's celebrations focused on people and places (not just fireworks, beautiful as they can be) for the Greater and Lesser Washington Flickr pool! In the meantime, here are our favorite new images this week, showcasing the best and worst of the Washington region.


Photo by Clif Burns.



Shaw. Photo by tedeytan.


Mt. Vernon trail. Photo by Joe Flood.


Folklife Festival. Photo by caroline.angelo.


Photo by Clif Burns.

Snapping some great images of the people and places in the DC region this weekend? Make sure to join our Flickr pool and submit your photos!

Transit


Yes, Virginia, here are the answers to whichWMATA week 12

On Monday, we posted our twelfth photo challenge to see how well you know Metro. I took photos of five Virginia stations. Here are the answers. How well did you do?

We only got 26 guesses on this post. Five people got them all right. Congratulations to Justin...., coneyraven, Peter K, Teyo, and Rich F. Great work!


Image 1: Huntington.

The first image shows the view north along the Yellow Line from the southern mezzanine of Huntington. This station is built into a hill, so the southern entrance is above the platform, while the northern entrance is underneath. There's a long sloped glass roof above the escalators here, which is where this view is from. 22 of you knew this one.


Image 2: Rosslyn.

This image was taken in the brand new eastern entrance to Rosslyn station, which is elevator-only. The modern mezzanine matches Metro's architectural style very well, especially the "Arch" stations that were built starting in the mid-1980s.

Several of you guessed Forest Glen, because of the multiple elevators, and while that was a good guess, Forest Glen's bank of elevators is arranged very differently (and was recently featured in Week 10). 19 of you correctly guessed Rosslyn.


Image 3: National Airport.

The third image shows the center track at National Airport station, one of only two stations in the system with this configuration. You can see a bridge across the tracks at the left side of the picture. This was installed while one of the elevators was being renovated. Almost everyone guessed this one correctly. 24 of you got the right answer.


Image 4: Eisenhower Avenue.

The fourth image was a little tricky. This is a shot from the platform at Eisenhower Avenue looking north at the Masonic Memorial. The Masonic tower is close to King Street, but it's easily visible from several stations, including Eisenhower Avenue. The giveaway here is the angle. If we were looking at the front of the tower (as from King Street), we would be able to see its pediment. The other main clue here is the building in the foreground, which is a movie theater. Several commenters recognized it.

Only 14 people correctly guessed Eisenhower Avenue. Eight people took the bait and guessed King Street.


Image 5: Pentagon City.

The final image was taken at Pentagon City. This one proved to be fairly hard. You can easily tell that it's a side platform station, which narrows the field considerably. The "waffle" architecture further narrows it. But the distinctive feature here is the set of knockout panels above the tunnel portal, designed for a future entrance at the south end of the station. Only ten got this one right.

Congratulations to the winners!

Think you can challenge your fellow Metro users with a photo? Get your camera(phone)s out. We're going to have another reader whichWMATA photo challenge soon. So get out there and take some potential whichWMATA pictures. We'll have details about submitting your photos next week.

Next Monday, we'll have 5 more photos for you to identify. Thanks for playing!

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