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Here are the answers to whichWMATA week 96

On Tuesday, we featured the ninety-sixth challenge to see how well you knew the Metro system. Here are the answers. How'd you do?

This week, we got 28 guesses. 14 got all five. Great work AlexC, Peter K, JamesDCane, ArlFfx, Sunny, dpod, Solomon, J-Train-21, Stephen C, Andy L, Bryce L, PeoplesRepublicSoldier, Peter K is a nice guy don't be hatin' on him, and We Will Crush Peter K!


Image 1: Huntington

Turns out that whichWMATA is for lovers, just like the state where all of these stations are located. The six of you who identified the theme are clearly the biggest transit lovers of all.

The first image shows the northern bus loop at Huntington station. This entrance to the station is beneath the aerial structure carrying the Yellow Line towards Eisenhower Avenue, and is fairly distinctive. All but two people guessed correctly, and the two incorrect guesses were Eisenhower Avenue. But you can see that the tracks here are separated approaching the island platform. At Eisenhower Avenue, the tracks are side-by-side, with platforms on either side of the tracks.

26 guessed correctly.


Image 2: National Airport

The second image shows the view of the southern portion of National Airport station, viewed from the upper level terminal roadway. The main clue is the setting of the station. It could be interpreted as a median station, given the roadway in the foreground. However, none of Metro's median stations have a "Gull I" canopy.

27 got the right answer.


Image 3: Dunn Loring

The third image shows covered bike parking at Dunn Loring station, installed as part of TOD redevelopment near the station. Most of you probably figured this one out by noting the highway signs visible through the trees. These guide signs include a digital screen to display toll information for the I-495 Express Lanes, so this has to be one of the stations near the interchange with I-66 and the Beltway. The yellow tab also signifies the left exit for the Express Lanes, which is an additional clue.

Other guesses included West Falls Church and Vienna, but it can't be either because of the orientation of the station. At West Falls Church, the only entrance above the level of the highway is to the south. But from that perspective, the station would extend to the left. Here, you can see the western end of Dunn Loring, which stretches to the right.

Vienna would have a perspective like this from the northern side entrance, but there's no highway sign in the vicinity. I-66 is also a bit wider at Vienna because of the collector-distributor lanes for Nutley Street.

Only Dunn Loring fits the bill, as 22 of you figured out.


Image 4: Greensboro

The fourth picture shows a view of Greensboro station on opening day. The architecture is clearly indicative of one of the new Silver Line stations, with the vaulted ceiling here making it one of the three "Gambrel" stations. The presence of the nearby office buildings from this perspective eliminates Wiehle Avenue. And at Tysons Corner, different buildings would be visible.

25 gave the correct answer.


Image 5: Vienna

The final image shows a view looking through the Vienna station from the north end of the station bridge. The three stations at the end of the Orange Line each have a bridge with a design similar to this one. But there's a key difference here. At Vienna, there are two bridges, one to each side of I-66. So it makes for a particularly long view through the station from either end.

But the other important difference is that at West Falls Church and Dunn Loring, the bridge only spans one side of I-66, ending at the station's mezzanine, which means you can't look through the station, like here. At those stations, the mezzanine would be visible as the end of the bridge.

16 came to the correct conclusion.

Thanks for playing! We'll be back in two weeks (December 20) with our final quiz of 2016.

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

Photography


Think you know Metro? It's whichWMATA week 96

It's time for the ninety-sixth installment of our weekly "whichWMATA" series! Below are photos of five stations in the Washington Metro system. Can you identify each from its picture?


Image 1


Image 2


Image 3


Image 4


Image 5

Please have your answers submitted by noon on Thursday. Good luck!

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

Photography


December days in the Flickr pool

Here are our favorite new images from the Greater and Lesser Washington Flickr pool, showcasing the best and worst of the Washington region.


2016 National Christmas Tree lighting. Photo by Ted Eytan.


Photo by nevermindtheend.


Oxon Hill park and ride. Photo by nevermindtheend.


Rosslyn. Photo by Jason OX4.


Dupont Circle. Photo by Mike Maguire.

Got a picture that depicts the best or worst of the Washington region? Make sure to join our Flickr pool and submit your own photos!

Photography


Here are the answers to whichWMATA week 95

On Tuesday, we featured the ninety-fifth challenge to see how well you knew the Metro system. Here are the answers. How'd you do?

This week, we got 23 guesses. Twelve got all five correct. Great work J-Train-21, dpod, maxG, Sunny, Stephen C, Solomon, Peter K, We Will Crush Peter K, JamesDCane, AlexC, PeoplesRepublicSoldier, and David Duck!


Image 1: Southern Avenue

This week was a themed week. All of the stations are located on or very close to a jurisdictional boundary shown on the Metro map.

The first image shows a view from the mezzanine at Southern Avenue, one of the four "high peak" stations in the system. This station, as its name indicates, sits on Southern Avenue, which forms the boundary between DC and Prince George's County. The main clue here was the bus loop bridge at the far end of the platform. We featured it in week 31.

17 knew the right answer.


Image 2: Friendship Heights

The second image shows Friendship Heights from the Western Avenue mezzanine. This is one of the "arch I" stations that are located along the Red Line northwest of downtown. Friendship Heights is the only one of those stations with two mezzanines. It also has globe lights atop pylons, which are only usually used at outdoor stations.

This station sits almost entirely in the District, but the northern wall of the station is just south of the Maryland line, but two of the four entrances from the Western Avenue mezzanine lead into Montgomery County.

20 guessed correctly.


Image 3: Takoma

The third picture shows the solitary elevator faregate at Takoma station. Takoma is the only above ground Red Line station that has a platform faregate. This is because the elevator here is located a good deal farther north than the escalator entrance at the southern end of the station. So it has its own fare control.

This station sits entirely within the District of Columbia, but Montgomery County (and the city of Takoma Park) is located just across Eastern Avenue, less than a block away.

19 got it right.


Image 4: Van Dorn Street

The fourth image shows the platform at Van Dorn Street, viewed from the sidewalk along Eisenhower Avenue. The outdoor nature of the station and the "gull I" canopy limit this to one of 12 stations. Since the station isn't elevated, you can further narrow the possibilities. But this four-lane road means it has to be Van Dorn Street, the only station that fits.

This station sits on the border between Alexandria City and Fairfax County. The station is in Fairfax County, but the road and bus loop is in Alexandria City.

21 figured it out.


Image 5: Capitol Heights

The final image shows the street elevator at Capitol Heights. There doesn't appear to be much to go on in this image at first glance. However, with a close look, you can spot a "Welcome to DC" sign in the center. This sign welcomes people driving in on Central Avenue as they cross Southern Avenue into DC from Prince George's County.

This station is entirely within Prince George's County, but is just across the street from the District.

16 came to the correct conclusion.

Great work, everyone! We'll be back in two weeks (on December 6) with another quiz.

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

Photography


Think you know Metro? It's whichWMATA week 95

It's time for the ninety-fifth installment of our weekly "whichWMATA" series! Below are photos of five stations in the Washington Metro system. Can you identify each from its picture?

This week, since Thursday is Thanksgiving, you'll get a little extra time to guess. We'll post the answers on Friday, so you get a few more hours to submit your guesses.


Image 1


Image 2


Image 3


Image 4


Image 5

Please have your answers submitted by 10 am on Friday. Good luck!

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

Photography


Sea lion silhouettes in the Flickr pool

Here are our favorite new images from the Greater and Lesser Washington Flickr pool, showcasing the best and worst of the Washington region.


National Zoo. Photo by Beau Finley.


15th and W Streets NW. Photo by BeyondDC.


Glen Echo. Photo by Joe Flood.


U Street. Photo by Jill Slater.


Chinatown. Photo by John J Young.

Got a picture that depicts the best or worst of the Washington region? Make sure to join our Flickr pool and submit your own photos!

Photography


Veterans Day in the Flickr pool

Here are our favorite Veterans Day images from the Greater and Lesser Washington Flickr pool. Thank you to our friends, neighbors, colleagues, and everyone who has served our country in uniform.


Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Thursday. Photo by Jarrett Hendrix.


"Bob is a Vietnam war Veteran, I had a nice conversation with him. He was at Freedom Plaza in support of the Occupy/K Street DC movement." 2011. Photo by pablo.raw.


WW II Memorial, 2015. Photo by Victoria Pickering.


McClellan Gate, Arlington National Cemetery, 2011. Photo by Brian Allen.

Got a picture that depicts the best or worst of the Washington region? Make sure to join our Flickr pool and submit your own photos!

Photography


Here are the answers to whichWMATA week 94

On Tuesday, we featured the ninety-fourth challenge to see how well you knew the Metro system. Here are the answers. How'd you do?

This week, we got 43 guesses. 30 got all five.

Normally when we get so many perfect scores, we don't list everyone. But this week it feels like people could use some positive energy, so here goes. Great work, TWillis, kevinfly, hopscans, Steven Yates, PLKDC, MZEBE, Wizfan, JessMan, MtPDC, Stephen C, Solomon, Andy L, JamesDCane, Transport., lioki, Yes2Kwasi, bsl35, DM, Justin..., Robb, Kevin M, Peter K, J-Train-21, Adam H, AlexC, Ampersand, dpod, ArlFfx, We Will Crush Peter K, and Peter K is a nice guy, don't be hatin' on him!


Image 1

The first image shows the sales office at Metro Center, near the south entrance to the station. This office will be closing permanently on November 15 as part of Metro's budget cutting. Whether the structure will be removed, I don't know. The sales office is itself fairly distinctive, but other clues included the broadness of the vault (the Blue/Orange/Silver platform below is wider than at typical stations) and the lamps on the far wall, part of an art installation.

40 guessed correctly.


Image 2

The second image shows the sunset viewed from the Cheverly station mezzanine. You can tell from the photo that this is one of Metro's few side platform stations. Since it's outdoor, that limits the possibilities to just three stations. One of the clues here is the transmission line visible at left.

These structures stand above the CSX Landover Subdivision, which used to be part of the electrified Pennsylvania Railroad freight bypass of the city. The catenary has been removed, since the line no longer uses electric locomotives. But the overhead lines still carry power to the Amtrak Northeast Corridor, which is located on the other side of the station, out of frame to the right.

36 got it right.


Image 3

The third image shows a sign outside Arlington Cemetery station. This station is only open to serve the cemetery, so when the cemetery is closed, the station closes. Since the cemetery has different hours in the winter months, so does the station. One other clue is barely visible: the platform elevators are screened by tall hedges, but you can just see them peeking out.

41 knew the right answer.


Image 4

The fourth image shows a closed entrance to Pentagon City station. This entrance leaves the station directly across from the mezzanine entrance and tunnels under Hayes Street to the northeast corner of the intersection with 12th Street. The entrance has been closed for years, but I've heard Arlington plans to reopen the entrance in the near future.

The station's southeast entrance and street elevator are also visible here. 33 got the answer correct.


Image 5

The final image shows the eastern escalator and platform elevator at Tenleytown station. The station is not directly under Wisconsin Avenue here. Instead, it's angled to make the curve into Yuma Street less sharp. Tenleytown is the only Arch I station to have a direct street-to-platform elevator, with a faregate on the platform. Because the station is angled, the elevator is also. The back wall of the elevator (left from this vantage point) is even with and parallel to the south wall of the station, so that should give you a sense of where the station sits relative to Wisconsin Avenue.

The angled elevator was certainly the primary clue here, as was the canopy-free escalator entrance. Some of you also recognized the awnings for Panera to the left.

37 came to the correct conclusion. Great work!

Thanks for playing! We'll be back in two weeks with our next quiz.

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

Photography


Think you know Metro? It's whichWMATA week 94

It's time for the ninety-fourth installment of our weekly "whichWMATA" series! Below are photos of five stations in the Washington Metro system. Can you identify each from its picture?

This week, there's an additional challenge. Before submitting your guesses, if you are eligible to do so, go vote (if it's still Tuesday before polls close when you are reading this). That is the most important thing you can do.


Image 1


Image 2


Image 3


Image 4


Image 5

Please have your answers submitted by noon on Thursday. Good luck!

UPDATE: The answers are here.

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

Photography


Roving in the Flickr pool

Here are our favorite new images from the Greater and Lesser Washington Flickr pool, showcasing the best and worst of the Washington region.


Ivy City. Photo by ep_jhu.


19th and M Street NW. Photo by Jill Slater.


Lillian and Albert Small Jewish Museum on the move. Photo by Colton Brown.


DC from the Potomac. Photo by John Sonderman.


Photo by Mike Maguire.

Got a picture that depicts the best or worst of the Washington region? Make sure to join our Flickr pool and submit your own photos!

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