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Here are the answers to whichWMATA week 82

On Tuesday, we posted our eighty-second photo challenge to see how well you knew Metro. I took photos of five Metro stations. Here are the answers. How well did you do?

This week, we got 27 guesses. Nine got all five. Great work Peter K, JamesDCane, Justin..., Chris H, AlexC, Dillon the Pickle, FN, Solomon, and Stephen C!


Image 1: Tysons Corner

The first image is the view of Tysons Corner station from the plaza adjacent to the Vita building. Given the unique Silver Line architecture, you should have been able to easily narrow this down to the two "Gambrel" style stations. But Tysons Corner station isn't in a median, like Greensboro is, so this can't be Greensboro. All but one of you got this one right. Great work.


Image 2: Fort Totten

The second picture shows the top of a memorial plaque in the mezzanine at Fort Totten. The "Y OF" that is visible is part of the phrase, "in memory of," and is a memorial to the nine people killed in the 2009 Metro crash just north of the station.

Additionally, the windows and angles here are indicative of the mezzanine shape of Fort Totten. From this vantage point, we're looking toward the two escalators connecting the mezzanine to the Green/Yellow platform.

Twenty knew the correct answer.


Image 3: Van Dorn Street

The third image shouldn't have been too hard if you know the architecture of the system. The presence of three Blue Line trains on the PIDS tells you that this is almost certainly a Blue-only station, of which there are only three in the system. This picture was taken on a Saturday, but even though you didn't know that, there are times (weekends and off-peak), when Van Dorn and Franconia are not served by the Yellow Line.

Two of the three Blue-only stations can be easily eliminated. Arlington Cemetery is depressed in an open cut (so the trees wouldn't be visible) and doesn't have a canopy at all. Instead, it's only covered where Memorial Avenue crosses it. Week 8 gives you a sense of what that looks like. Franconia/Springfield, on the other hand has a very different canopy and the PIDS signs have a different format at terminal stations (BLUE LINE | LARGO CENTER | LEAVING 3 MINS).

But even if there had been only one Blue Line train on the board, you still could have solved this. That's because the canopy visible here is a "Gull I" design. And the only Gull I station served by the Blue Line is Van Dorn Street.

Twenty-five figured it out.


Image 4: Wheaton

The fourth image was a little trickier, and required you to take a second look to figure out that this was Wheaton. Many of you went with your first instinct, but closer inspection should have revealed this to be a twin-tube station. One clue is the presence of "can" lights hanging from the vault, which aren't present at the higher single-vault stations.

The perspective here is clearly looking through the doors of an elevator. Some downtown stations do have side platforms with the elevator in an alcove off to the side like this. But all of those stations have the "waffle" design, not the taller coffer "arch"-style. None of the "Arch I" or "Arch II" stations have side platforms. And that means this has to be one of the twin-tube stations.

It can't be Forest Glen because, as several of you noted, the elevators there all land in a common lobby and are farther from the tracks. At Wheaton, however, the solitary elevator lands not in the escalator lobby, but in an alcove at the far northern end of the Shady Grove platform.

Ten came to the correct conclusion.


Image 5: Capitol Heights

The final image was even more challenging, but there was enough information to figure out that it's Capitol Heights.

Like with image 3 above, you can tell that this station is served only by the Blue and Silver Lines (since the Orange Line isn't listed on the sign). There are only two underground stations that are served by the Blue and Silver, so even without additional information, you could have made a guess with a 50/50 probability of getting the right answer. Some of you did that and got lucky.

But there was a way to be 100% certain, and it involves knowing that while Benning Road and Capitol Heights are nearly identical, they're mirror images of each other. In week 56 we also ran a set with a similar signage clue and noted in the answers post the difference between the two stations.

At both stations, the single mezzanine is at the far end of the platform. At Benning Road, the mezzanine is at the east end. At Capitol Heights, it's at the west end. That means that when you descend to the platform at Capitol Heights, you're facing east. And if you're facing east, trains going eastbound to Largo are on your right, and trains going west toward downtown are on your left.

One final note: The reason you know this sign is at the bottom of the escalator when you arrive is because this is a fairly typical application of WMATA's signing in this case, since this is a decision point and because anywhere else on the platform, the column would also include a strip map of farther stations reached on the appropriate track.

Nineteen came to the correct conclusion.

Thanks for playing! We'll be back in two weeks with our next quiz.

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

Photography


Think you know Metro? It's whichWMATA week 82

It's time for the eighty-second installment of our weekly "whichWMATA" series! Below are photos of five stations in the Washington Metro system. Can you identify each from its picture?


Image 1


Image 2


Image 3


Image 4


Image 5

We'll hide the comments so the early birds don't spoil the fun. Please have your answers in by noon on Thursday.

UPDATE: The answers are here.

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

Photography


Monotone in the Flickr pool

Here are some of our favorite black and white perspectives, inspired by this week's new images from the Greater and Lesser Washington Flickr pool.


Metro. Photo by John J Young.


Convention Center. Photo by Beau Finley.


Fort Totten Metro. Photo by Mike Maguire.


Union Station. Photo by Beau Finley.


Union Market. Photo by Jill Slater.


14th & U Street NW. Photo by Mike Maguire.

Got a picture that depicts the best or worst of the Washington region? Make sure to join our Flickr pool and submit your own photos showcasing the best and worst of the Washington region!

Photography


DC aglow in the Flickr pool

Here are some of our favorite perspectives of DC aglow at blue hour, golden hour, or after dark, inspired by this week's new images from the Greater and Lesser Washington Flickr pool.


View west from the Hopscotch Bridge. Photo by Kian McKellar.


Shaw Library. Photo by Ted Eytan.


USS Barry, Navy Yard. Photo by mosley.brian.


Farragut Square. Photo by ctj71081.


Urbana, Dupont Circle. Photo by Rob Cannon.

Got a picture that depicts the best or worst of the Washington region? Make sure to join our Flickr pool and submit your own photos showcasing the best and worst of the Washington region!

Photography


Here are the answers to whichWMATA week 81

On Tuesday, we posted our eighty-first photo challenge to see how well you knew Metro. I took photos of five Metro stations. Here are the answers. How well did you do?

This week, we got 50 guesses. Sixteen got all five. Great work JamesDCane, AlexC, Peter K, Eric P, Stephen C, ajw4, Solomon, Sand Box John, FN, Chris H, Andy L, dpod, DavidDuck, merarch, Travis Maiers, and We Will Crush Peter K!


Image 1: Medical Center

The first image shows a platform pylon at Medical Center. There are five stations in the system with "center" in their name: Federal Center SW, Largo Town Center, Medical Center, Metro Center, and Mount Vernon Square/Convention Center.

However, Metro Center and Federal Center have waffle-style vaults, Largo is outdoors, and the "Center" in Mount Vernon Square wraps onto a second line of text on the pylon. That leaves Medical Center. Additionally, you can see that the vault here has only four coffers, making it Arch I, present only on the Red Line's Shady Grove end.

Forty-four knew this one.


Image 2: Branch Avenue

The second image shows the southern terminal of the Green Line, Branch Avenue. There are only four high peak stations, which narrows the field considerably. The next train indicator is a hint that this station is a terminal station. It's true that these signs are also present at some stations that used to be terminals, however none of the high peak stations are former terminals.

That leaves the two current terminals, Franconia/Springfield and Branch Avenue. However, Franconia is not in an open cut with retaining walls on either side. Additonally, the trapezoidal caps on the columns supporting the canopy are only present at Branch Avenue. That attribute was featured in week 66.

Forty-three got the right answer.


Image 3: Cheverly

The third image shows a view looking northwest from the Vienna platform at Cheverly. This image was harder than I anticipated, given the clues present.

The presence of single-level Amtrak equipment narrows this down to one of the stations along the Orange Line between Cheverly and New Carrollton, the Blue Line between Braddock Road and Franconia, and NoMa. The only Amtrak service along the Red Line is the Capitol Limited, which uses double-decker equipment.

But another clue is that the station has side platforms, which you can tell from the perspective. Finally, it's an outdoor side-platform station with a mezzanine above the tracks. Only Cheverly fits the bill.

Only 30 got the correct result.


Image 4: Vienna

The fourth image shows a view from the platform escalator into the mezzanine at Vienna. The main clue is the sign overhead, which directs passengers to the north and south side access roads, with buses and parking on both sides, a situation only present at Vienna and Wiehle Avenue.

The skylights are indicative of a general peak station with a mezzanine above the tracks. And the design here is clearly older than the more modern touches on the recently-opened Silver Line.

Thirty-nine guessed correctly.


Image 5: King Street

The final image shows a station pylon at King Street. This one was a little tricky, I'll admit, which is why I put it last. I order the five images so that they increase with (what I believe to be) difficulty from first to last.

The entrance pylon at the corner of King Street and Diagonal Road was never updated after the Blue Line was extended from National Airport to Van Dorn Street in 1991 (the Yellow Line was extended from National Airport to Huntington, including King Street, in 1983).

Many of you were either familiar with the absence of the blue stripe on this pylon or correctly deduced that the letter just below the yellow stripe was a "K". King Street is the only station that starts with the letter K.

I know it was tempting to guess Huntington, since the first letter clearly wasn't an E, and only Eisenhower Avenue and Huntington are served only by the Yellow Line. However, this erroneously labled pylon is distinctive, and I left enough of the K, I thought, for this to be fair game.

Twenty-four of you figured it out anyway. Great work!

Thanks for playing! We'll be back in two weeks with our next quiz.

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

Photography


Think you know Metro? It's whichWMATA week 81

It's time for the eighty-first installment of our weekly "whichWMATA" series! Below are photos of five stations in the Washington Metro system. Can you identify each from its picture?


Image 1


Image 2


Image 3


Image 4


Image 5

We'll hide the comments so the early birds don't spoil the fun. Please have your answers in by noon on Thursday.

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

Photography


Look to the sky in the Flickr pool

Here are our favorite new images from the Greater and Lesser Washington Flickr pool, showcasing the best and worst of the Washington region.


The Cherry Blossom Kite Festival. Photo by Victoria Pickering.


A reflection of the Smithsonian castle. Photo by Beau Finley.


MLK Memorial security. Photo by John Jack Photography.


Opening day at Nationals Park. Photo by Rob Pegoraro.


A District gas station. Photo by Jamelle Bouie.

Got a picture that depicts the best or worst of the Washington region? Make sure to join our Flickr pool and submit your own photos!

Photography


Greater and Lesser Washingtons in the Flickr pool

This article was posted as an April Fool's joke.

Here are our favorite new images from the Greater and Lesser Washington Flickr pool, showcasing the best and worst of Washingtons.


The Hay-Adams Hotel. Photo by Wally Gobetz.


Demolition & construction impacting L Street bikeway. Photo by Washington Dept of Transportation.


Washington Capitol dome. Photo by Matt' Johnson.


Court House Metro. Photo by Jerry and Pat Donaho.


Rockville Town Center. Photo by Adam Moss.


Boundary stone. Photo by Elizabeth.

Got a picture that depicts the best or worst of the Washington DC region? Make sure to join our Flickr pool and submit your own photos!

Photography


It's cherry blossom time in the Flickr pool

Here are our favorite new images from the Greater and Lesser Washington Flickr pool, showcasing the best and worst of the Washington region.


On bike and on foot. Photo by Brett Young.


Blossomception. Photo by John Sonderman.


Temporary seating? Photo by nevermindtheend.


For all ages. Photo by Joe Flood.


Road work. Photo by nevermindtheend.

Got a picture that depicts the best or worst of the Washington region? Make sure to join our Flickr pool and submit your own photos.

Photography


Here are the answers to whichWMATA week 80

On Tuesday, we posted our eightieth photo challenge to see how well you knew Metro. I took photos of five Metro stations. Here are the answers. How well did you do?

This week, we got 30 guesses. Ten got all five. Great work Peter K, JamesDCane, DavidDuck, Stephen C, Chris H, AlexC, Solomon, FN, We Will Crush Peter K, and dpod!


Image 1: Greensboro

The first image shows the view looking westbound from the mezzanine at Greensboro station. Greensboro is one of just three stations with the soaring "gambrel" style roof. You can discount Wiehle Avenue because that station is located in a wide freeway median and doesn't have the lower v-shaped canopy visible at bottom center here. Tysons Corner is out because that station is not in the median of a roadway at all, it's off to the north side of Route 123.

So the process of elimination leaves us with Greensboro. But other clues include the buildings on either side, which you might recognize, and the long straightaway leading toward Spring Hill. Twenty-five knew this one.


Image 2: Dupont Circle

The next station is Dupont Circle. The photo here shows the wide bowl that holds the northern (Q Street) escalators after a snowfall. This entrance is probably the most distinctive in the system, and in fact, we've already featured this entrance no fewer than five times, in week 22, week 33, week 38, week 40, and week 53.

The main clue here is the circular walls, leaving lots of space between the escalators. The planters are just discernible under the snow, which was another hint. The vantage point provides a final clue, since most of Metro's escalators are in a concrete tube, only the broad opening at Dupont north allows this perspective.

Twenty-six guessed correctly.


Image 3: Takoma

The third image shows the elevator entrance to Takoma station. This somewhat foreboding opening leads to the elevator in the center of the platform. The escalators and station manager's booth are located farther south, at the end of the platform.

This entrance is fairly unique. Grosvenor and Deanwood do have entrances that are somewhat similar looking, but also distinct. The Red Line icon may have helped you narrow this down.

Twenty figured it out.


Image 4: Landover

This photo shows the view from the parking lot of Landover station. A few stations are built on embankments like this, with broad, open plazas leading to an entrance below the tracks. Notably, Landover, New Carrollton (east), Greenbelt (east), Shady Grove (east), and Twinbrook (east) have this setup.

But you can narrow this down to Landover and New Carrollton easily by noting the catenary and traction power transmission masts visible behind the station. These towers supply power to the electrified Amtrak Northeast Corridor, which runs alongside the Orange Line between Cheverly and New Carrollton.

It can't be New Carrollton because that station is quite different. To the right of the Metro entrance is a second opening for the Amtrak waiting room. A Greyhound Bus ticket window is located in the plaza, as is a distinctive clocktower. Additionally, from this angle at New Carrollton, you'd be able to see the parking structure on this side and office buildings on the opposite side of the tracks.

Nineteen correctly surmised that this was Landover.


Image 5: McPherson Square

The final image was the hardest. It shows the view looking upward while descending the escalator into McPherson Square's Franklin Square (14th Street) entrance. I debated for a while whether this image would be too hard, but many of you did guess correctly, so I suppose I should give you more credit.

The architecture and the fact that the entrance itself appears to be covered by a building means that this is probably a station in downtown Washington. The curvature of the building above (1400 Eye Street) was a major clue. We featured the same curve in week 39.

Other clues included the facade of 1350 Eye Street, taking up the right third of the image and the tip of one of the towers of One Franklin Square at center left.

Ten impressed me by getting the right answer.

Thanks for playing! We'll be back in two weeks with our next quiz.

Information about contest rules, submission guidelines, and a leaderboard is available at http://ggwash.org/whichwmata.

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